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uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

Trigger level set on exchange



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 24th 03, 01:24 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Roderick Stewart
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 90
Default Trigger level set on exchange

In article , Andrew Hodgson
wrote:
Does anyone know the lowest number of registrations on an exchange in
the past before a trigger level has been officially set?


I think they just invent a number out of thin air, possibly depending
on the estimated cost of providing the service to a particular area. Or
possibly not. My exchange, for example, had a target figure of 400 for
many months, and an availability website showed the figure gradually
creeping up over the weeks from about 120/400 to about 290/400, when it
suddenly changed to 349/350 where it has stayed for about a month,
shortly followed by an actual service date.

It's all a bit of a nonsense anyway. I wonder how long a commercial
company with honest competition would survive trying to sell something
to the public, advertising it, and then requiring that their
prospective customers should campaign for it and wait in a queue?

Rod.

  #2  
Old August 24th 03, 03:01 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Sunil Sood
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,590
Default Trigger level set on exchange


"Roderick Stewart" wrote in message
...
You're probably right, but isn't BT supposed to be a public service,

not a
commercial company? The same kind of public service that charges the

same
amount to post a letter, for instance, anywhere in mainland Britain?

Public services provide whatever they provide equally to everybody,

with
the cost averaged over the the whole nation. The cost of provision to
"difficult" areas is effectively subsidised by those who live in
commercially lucrative ones, but for something as fundamental as
communicatons, it can be argued that this is a worthwhile cost as the

value
of the service is increased for everyone by virtue of it being

universally
available. What would be the value of a communication system if you

could
only use it to communicate with a limited number of people?


Yes, but the public service part of BT only applies to voice
calls/telephones and (now) providing data speeds of up to 28.8K

BT's Public Service obligations are as defined by Universial Service
Obligation (USO) which is available at
http://www.oftel.gov.uk/publications...03/uso0703.pdf - it
was only updated last month (to increase the minimum acceptable data
speed to 28.8K from 2.4K)

Why aren't they gradually replacing all the copper to our homes with

fibre
as a matter of routine?


BT offered to "fibre up the whole of the UK" in the late 1980's, at the
then cost of £15 billion +, if they were given permission to sell new
services over their network (VoD, TV etc)

The government at the time said no - they wanted to give cable companies
an (unfair?) advantage...

Regards
Sunil


  #3  
Old August 24th 03, 08:00 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Roderick Stewart
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 90
Default Trigger level set on exchange

In article , Sunil Sood wrote:
Yes, but the public service part of BT only applies to voice
calls/telephones and (now) providing data speeds of up to 28.8K

BT's Public Service obligations are as defined by Universial Service
Obligation (USO) which is available at
http://www.oftel.gov.uk/publications...03/uso0703.pdf - it
was only updated last month (to increase the minimum acceptable data
speed to 28.8K from 2.4K)


That suggests the government are even further behind the times than BT.
Looking at how far telecoms has progressed in the last ten years or so,
(mobile phones and the internet practically unknown developing to the
almost indispensable resources they are today), we should assume that the
next ten years is going to produce an explosion of possibilities that we
are just not going to be in a position to put into practice because of
outdated attitudes.

The technology is available *now* to send broadcast quality video and
audio signals through gigabit ethernet and fibre-optic networks, and
broadcasters are routinely using it. It would be technically possible for
*all* the communications and entertainment services to enter and leave a
household through one small box connmected to a fibre, and with all the
computers, telephones, TV sets, radio sets, home video equipment and
whatever, plugged into the box, or communicating with it via short-range
radio. No aerials on the roof, no satellite dishes, no separate cabling
for telephones, just one fibre for everything. There could be a TV in
every room, all showing different programmes, from anywhere in the world,
some scheduled by broadcasters, some played on demand by the viewers. We
don't need to invent anything new to make this possible - it already *is*
possible - we just need the will to make it happen.

Why aren't they gradually replacing all the copper to our homes with

fibre
as a matter of routine?


BT offered to "fibre up the whole of the UK" in the late 1980's, at the
then cost of £15 billion +, if they were given permission to sell new
services over their network (VoD, TV etc)

The government at the time said no - they wanted to give cable companies
an (unfair?) advantage...


A half-baked implementation of something that could have been really good
if it had been organised properly. The license to cable Britain should
only have been given to the cable companies on condition that they made
their services available to everyone in their regions, and where
necessary, the law should have been changed or adapted to make this
possible. That's what governments do isn't it? My road, for instance, is
unadopted, which means that the cable companies aren't allowed to dig it
up unless they canvass everyone in the road and get them to sign a legal
document giving permission, and they couldn't be bothered, so I'm stuck
with whatever BT can give me down copper wires from the nearest telegraph
pole. Is it really 2003 already?

Rod.

  #4  
Old August 24th 03, 10:22 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Stig Bronson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 13
Default Trigger level set on exchange


"Roderick Stewart" wrote in message
"I'm stuck with whatever BT can give me down copper wires from the nearest
telegraph pole. Is it really 2003 already?"

No your not - if you feel that strongly you can set up your own coms company
and network the UK with fibre - just create a business plan and ask a bank
for a business loan.

When they blow you out and tell you it's not viable you'll understand why
those at BT (A profit making communications company) are paid to invest
wisely.

I'm not knocking your vision of the future - but it would be commercial
suicide.

I recall the bull**** and fuss NTL made about their 'Fibre Optic Network' to
the home. I'm sure it was and still is just to the local tin box - with
copper/coax from there to the customer. Pretty much the same as BT's atex to
atex figure 8 uk fibre but without the backup of copper and the spread - and
that was one of their selling points.........?


  #5  
Old August 24th 03, 11:59 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Roderick Stewart
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 90
Default Trigger level set on exchange

In article , Stig Bronson wrote:
"Roderick Stewart" wrote in message
"I'm stuck with whatever BT can give me down copper wires from the nearest
telegraph pole. Is it really 2003 already?"

No your not - if you feel that strongly you can set up your own coms company
and network the UK with fibre - just create a business plan and ask a bank
for a business loan.


You didn't read the last bit properly. The reason why I can't have cable is
that my road is unadopted and cannot legally be dug up to lay cables or
anything else without the permission of the whole street. A cable company did
come around a few years ago, and I did sign up for their services, but after a
few months they just seemed to give up and gave my deposit back. If the
cabling up of the UK had been properly organised, it would only have taken a
small adjustment to the law to make this simple thing possible in situations
like mine. I shouldn't have to start my own company to obtain a simple
advertised service that somebody wants to sell to me and is available
elsewhere only dozens of yards away.

Rod.

  #6  
Old August 25th 03, 02:20 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Kráftéé
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 184
Default Trigger level set on exchange

Roderick Stewart wrote:
In article , Stig Bronson
wrote:
"Roderick Stewart" wrote in message
"I'm stuck with whatever BT can give me down copper wires from the
nearest telegraph pole. Is it really 2003 already?"

No your not - if you feel that strongly you can set up your own
coms company and network the UK with fibre - just create a
business plan and ask a bank for a business loan.


You didn't read the last bit properly. The reason why I can't have
cable is that my road is unadopted and cannot legally be dug up to
lay cables or anything else without the permission of the whole
street. A cable company did come around a few years ago, and I did
sign up for their services, but after a few months they just seemed
to give up and gave my deposit back. If the cabling up of the UK
had been properly organised, it would only have taken a small
adjustment to the law to make this simple thing possible in
situations like mine. I shouldn't have to start my own company to
obtain a simple advertised service that somebody wants to sell to
me and is available elsewhere only dozens of yards away.

Rod.


Now we understand, it's not Bt, NTL or Telewest you are concerened
about, it's the fact that your desires have been effectively blocked
but some of your neighbours as they don't want your local cable
company digging trenches across their gardens.

Why didn't you say this from the beggining instead fo the tirade which
you did post....

--
B-)
Life is pain.....
Deal with it!!


  #7  
Old August 25th 03, 12:24 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Graham in Melton
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 167
Default Trigger level set on exchange

On 25/8/03 2:20 am, in article
, "Kraftee"
wrote:

Roderick Stewart wrote:
In article , Stig Bronson
wrote:
"Roderick Stewart" wrote in message
"I'm stuck with whatever BT can give me down copper wires from the
nearest telegraph pole. Is it really 2003 already?"

No your not - if you feel that strongly you can set up your own
coms company and network the UK with fibre - just create a
business plan and ask a bank for a business loan.


You didn't read the last bit properly. The reason why I can't have
cable is that my road is unadopted and cannot legally be dug up to
lay cables or anything else without the permission of the whole
street. A cable company did come around a few years ago, and I did
sign up for their services, but after a few months they just seemed
to give up and gave my deposit back. If the cabling up of the UK
had been properly organised, it would only have taken a small
adjustment to the law to make this simple thing possible in
situations like mine. I shouldn't have to start my own company to
obtain a simple advertised service that somebody wants to sell to
me and is available elsewhere only dozens of yards away.

Rod.


Now we understand, it's not Bt, NTL or Telewest you are concerened
about, it's the fact that your desires have been effectively blocked
but some of your neighbours as they don't want your local cable
company digging trenches across their gardens.

Why didn't you say this from the beggining instead fo the tirade which
you did post....


Because he'd come across an idiot ? Someone who buys a house on an
un-adopted road and acts surprised when the co-owners don't want it dug up ?



  #8  
Old August 25th 03, 02:51 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Roderick Stewart
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 90
Default Trigger level set on exchange

In article ,
Kraftee wrote:
Now we understand, it's not Bt, NTL or Telewest you are concerened
about, it's the fact that your desires have been effectively blocked
but some of your neighbours as they don't want your local cable
company digging trenches across their gardens.


I've no idea what my neighbours want because the cable companies
couldn't be bothered to ask them, and it's not my job to sort out their
legalities for them. There was certainly no talk of digging up gardens,
just the usual small trench along the road, similar to the ones they
were putting cables into everywhere else.

I bought the house long before the "cable revolution", and in any case
nobody said there would be any problem with the provision of amenities,
and it never would have crossed my mind to ask. All the other amenities
are here, and the appropriate companies seem to have all the necessary
legal permissions to dig the road up when needed because I've seen them
do it.

This is not a "tirade", just a suggestion that communication services
are as fundamental to modern life as things like water and electricity,
and should be available to everybody.

Rod.

  #9  
Old August 25th 03, 04:47 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Roderick Stewart
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 90
Default Trigger level set on exchange

In article , Stig Bronson wrote:
"just a suggestion that communication services are as fundamental to modern
life as things like water and electricity, and should be available to
everybody."

Really - great. Mind if I put a mobile mast up next to your front garden
then?


I'd rather you didn't, but perfectly adequate mobile phone services seem to be
possible without this level of personal intrusion, as I'm sure you know.

telecoms are *NOT* classed as essential services. I can't see 'ability to
quickly download stolen music files, porn & movies' as being reasonable
justification to dig anything up......


Who said anything about porn or stolen material? This would never be part of
my justification for suggesting the provision of modern communication
services, any more than the "ability" to joyride at illegal speeds in stolen
vehicles has ever been a justification for building roads.

Rod.


  #10  
Old August 25th 03, 06:08 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Stig Bronson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 13
Default Trigger level set on exchange


"Roderick Stewart" wrote in message
"any more than the "ability" to joyride at illegal speeds in stolen vehicles
has ever been a justification for building roads."

Fast becoming impossible because of all the dug up roads........




:-)


 




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