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uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

Broadband Router



 
 
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  #1  
Old February 18th 04, 12:09 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Gareth :-\)
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Posts: 2
Default Broadband Router

Hi,

Sorry if this sounds thick but can a router be used instaed of a dsl modem?
I saw a site somewhere that said you can but I thought they were just for
sharing internet connections.



  #2  
Old February 18th 04, 02:38 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Tiscali Tim
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 70
Default Broadband Router

In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
Gareth :-) wrote:

Hi,

Sorry if this sounds thick but can a router be used instaed of a dsl
modem? I saw a site somewhere that said you can but I thought they
were just for sharing internet connections.



Depends on the router! Some incorporate an ADSL modem - some don't. Make
sure you get one that *does* if that's what you want.
--
Cheers,
Tim
______
Please reply to newsgroup. Reply address is Black Hole!


  #3  
Old February 18th 04, 02:53 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
King Queen
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Posts: 113
Default Broadband Router

On Wed, 18 Feb 2004 12:09:55 -0000, "Gareth :-\)" wrote:

Hi,

Sorry if this sounds thick but can a router be used instaed of a dsl modem?
I saw a site somewhere that said you can but I thought they were just for
sharing internet connections.


They can - you need an ADSL router - but if you don't want to
connection share or network your computers there seems little point
(i.e. if you only have one computer what's wrong with a modem?)
  #4  
Old February 18th 04, 02:54 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
J Houston
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Posts: 16
Default Broadband Router


"Gareth :-)" wrote in message
...
Hi,

Sorry if this sounds thick but can a router be used instaed of a dsl

modem?
I saw a site somewhere that said you can but I thought they were just for
sharing internet connections.


I use a Draytek Vigor 2600 Router, and yes, it does exactly what
you're asking. The old USB modem is in the bottom drawer since
the Vigor does it all - you set up the configurations (ADSL account
username/password, IP address of the router, etc) via an Internet
Explorer browser. Quite simple to set up and maintain, and a damn
sight better than most USB modems you get from ISP's. Quite
expensive though.

If you're going to buy a ADSL Router, you'll need a network cable
(with RJ45 connectors on each end). Connect them together, then you
set up your PC with a manually assigned(*) IP address, say, 192.168.1.1
(subnet 255.255.255.0) - set the router to, say, 192.168.1.100. Then
on your PC, set the 'Default Gateway' to 192.168.1.100. That should do it.

(* - you could let the Router allocate IP addresses, but some might not
have this feature, and setting it manually is easy enough)


James H


  #5  
Old February 18th 04, 03:36 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
King Queen
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 113
Default Broadband Router

On Wed, 18 Feb 2004 14:54:39 +0000 (UTC), "J Houston"
wrote:

(subnet 255.255.255.0)


I never quite understood what that means - could some bright spark
explain to me in words of one syllable?

Thanks!
  #6  
Old February 18th 04, 03:53 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Tiscali Tim
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 70
Default Broadband Router

In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
King Queen wrote:

On Wed, 18 Feb 2004 14:54:39 +0000 (UTC), "J Houston"
wrote:

(subnet 255.255.255.0)


I never quite understood what that means - could some bright spark
explain to me in words of one syllable?

Thanks!



Have a look at http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/S/subnet_mask.html - or simply
do a Google search on "subnet mask" and you'll find lots of information.
--
Cheers,
Tim
______
Please reply to newsgroup. Reply address is Black Hole!


  #7  
Old February 18th 04, 06:02 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
J Houston
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 16
Default Broadband Router


"King Queen" wrote in message
...
On Wed, 18 Feb 2004 14:54:39 +0000 (UTC), "J Houston"
wrote:

(subnet 255.255.255.0)


I never quite understood what that means - could some bright spark
explain to me in words of one syllable?



Say you're using Windows XP and you manually put in an IP address
of 192.168.0.1 - WinXP will automatically put 255.255.255.0 into
the subnet mask field, so dont worry about it



James H


  #8  
Old February 18th 04, 10:50 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Markus G. Klötzer
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 35
Default Broadband Router

"Tiscali Tim" wrote:

I never quite understood what that means - could some bright spark
explain to me in words of one syllable?

Thanks!



Have a look at http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/S/subnet_mask.html -


hmm, even more confused.

cu

mgk
--
WYTYSYDG - What you thought you saw, you didn't get.
  #9  
Old February 18th 04, 11:37 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Piers James
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Posts: 59
Default Broadband Router

the subnet mask defines how much of the network address has to be under the
same domain. All IP addresses are made up of 4 numbers in the range 0-254.
Therefore if you have a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0, then only the last
number in your IP addresses on your network can be differen SO if you have 3
computers at home sharing a broadband connection via a router, they might
have IP addresses as follows:-

192.168.0.1
192.168.0.2
192.168.0.3

A subnet mask of 255.255.0.0 would indicate that only the first 2 numbers
need match, as follows:-

192.168.1.1
192.168.2.2
192.168.3.3

I hope that explains it OK, and that I haven't got it wrong ;-)


"King Queen" wrote in message
...
On Wed, 18 Feb 2004 14:54:39 +0000 (UTC), "J Houston"
wrote:

(subnet 255.255.255.0)


I never quite understood what that means - could some bright spark
explain to me in words of one syllable?

Thanks!



  #10  
Old February 19th 04, 12:06 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Tiscali Tim
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 70
Default Broadband Router

In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
Piers James -nospam wrote:

the subnet mask defines how much of the network address has to be
under the same domain. All IP addresses are made up of 4 numbers in
the range 0-254. Therefore if you have a subnet mask of
255.255.255.0, then only the last number in your IP addresses on your
network can be differen SO if you have 3 computers at home sharing a
broadband connection via a router, they might have IP addresses as
follows:-

192.168.0.1
192.168.0.2
192.168.0.3

A subnet mask of 255.255.0.0 would indicate that only the first 2
numbers need match, as follows:-

192.168.1.1
192.168.2.2
192.168.3.3

I hope that explains it OK, and that I haven't got it wrong ;-)


I think that's right. It's called a mask because you have to do a bitwise
logical AND of the mask and the IP address to arrive at the sub-net (the
part of the address which is common to all members of a domain.

Taking your example, ANDing 192.168.x.x with 255.255.0.0 gives 192.168.0.0 -
where the 2 trailing zeros mean "don't care".

Masks are 32 bits in length, divided into 4 groups of 8. The first 3 groups
are usually a full house [11111111 = 255]. The last group invariably has
some of its trailing bits as zeros, examples being:
10000000 = 128
11000000 = 192
11100000 = 224
11110000 = 240
etc.

Hope that removes some of the confusion - although I fear it may add to it!
g
--
Cheers,
Tim
______
Please reply to newsgroup. Reply address is Black Hole!


 




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