A Broadband and ADSL forum. BroadbanterBanter

Welcome to BroadbanterBanter.

You are currently viewing as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions and other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today.

Go Back   Home » BroadbanterBanter forum » Newsgroup Discussions » uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband)
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

Speed of Wireless



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old April 5th 04, 08:44 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
zeebop
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 47
Default Speed of Wireless

If a typical switch can deal with transfers of up to 10Mb or 100Mb,
what can a wireless switch or router deal with?
  #2  
Old April 5th 04, 09:17 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Albrow, Sam J
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 27
Default Speed of Wireless

"zeebop" wrote in message
...
If a typical switch can deal with transfers of up to 10Mb or 100Mb,
what can a wireless switch or router deal with?


100 on the fixed network (but will be compatible with products that work at
10), and then whatever the standard supports wireless - i.e. 54 if its
802.11g.

This is a generalisation of cource but it would be rare to find anything
different.

Sam


---
If you have any queries regarding this email please contact Horshamnet on
08708811293.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.648 / Virus Database: 415 - Release Date: 31/03/2004


  #3  
Old April 5th 04, 11:01 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
zeebop
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 47
Default Speed of Wireless

On Mon, 5 Apr 2004 21:17:30 +0100, "Albrow, Sam J"
wrote:

"zeebop" wrote in message
.. .
If a typical switch can deal with transfers of up to 10Mb or 100Mb,
what can a wireless switch or router deal with?


100 on the fixed network (but will be compatible with products that work at
10), and then whatever the standard supports wireless - i.e. 54 if its
802.11g.

This is a generalisation of cource but it would be rare to find anything
different.

Sam




So it sounds like PC to PC transfer across wireless is approx half
what you can do on a wired network?
  #4  
Old April 5th 04, 11:12 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
eusty
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 31
Default Speed of Wireless

zeebop wrote:
On Mon, 5 Apr 2004 21:17:30 +0100, "Albrow, Sam J"
wrote:


"zeebop" wrote in message
. ..

If a typical switch can deal with transfers of up to 10Mb or 100Mb,
what can a wireless switch or router deal with?


100 on the fixed network (but will be compatible with products that work at
10), and then whatever the standard supports wireless - i.e. 54 if its
802.11g.

This is a generalisation of cource but it would be rare to find anything
different.

Sam





So it sounds like PC to PC transfer across wireless is approx half
what you can do on a wired network?


On a good day!!!

802.11g makes a *lot* of difference to just going over 802.11b

--
eusty
UK Broadband Usergroup : http://www.uk-bug.net

(`._. All Outgoing Mail Scanned Virus Free ._.)
  #5  
Old April 5th 04, 11:42 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Baz
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 33
Default Speed of Wireless

"zeebop" wrote in message
...

So it sounds like PC to PC transfer across wireless is approx half
what you can do on a wired network?


Well, like Sam was getting at, it depends on which standard of wireless is
in use.

Found this:-
http://wireless.about.com/cs/wireles...elessspeed.htm
"The performance of Wi-Fi networks in practice never approaches the
theoretical maximum. 802.11b networks, for example, generally operate no
faster than about 50% of theoretical peak, or 5.5 Mbps. Likewise, 802.11a
and 802.11g networks generally run no faster than 20 Mbps. The disparity
between theoretical and practical performance comes from protocol overhead,
signal interference, and decreasing signal distance with distance. In
addition, the more devices communicating on a WLAN simultaneously, the
slower the network will appear."

I've got a friend with a Netgear wireless setup, think it's 802.11g+
(officially, it's 54Mbps, but, it uses channel bonding to get 108Mbps).
108Mbps sounds faster than the 100Mbps you would get from wired fast
ethernet. But, as the article from about.com (above) points out, this would
not be the case.

Mainly, it all depends on the network equipment in use.

Wireless is a *broadcast* form of communications.
If we take an example of 8 PCs on a wireless 54Mbps network, 4 of which are
simultaneously sending massive amounts of data to the other 4, then the
network will easily become flooded, because the entire network (in this
instance) only has 54Mbps to service all 8 clients.

The same example on a switched, wired network, and each pair of PCs (1
sending, 1 receiving) has 100Mbps of it's own, with no impact to the other 3
pairs of conversations. In this instance, the network is acheiving 400Mbps
(broken down into 4 seperate 100Mbps).

Of course, this is just a lay-mans example, there are many other points to
consider.

In reality, you would be unlikely to network 8 network-heavy PCs via
wireless, and transfer such large files concurrently.

Likewise, home users may connect their PCs via hubs, and not via full-duplex
switches.
Difference between hubs and switches:-
http://wireless.about.com/library/tips/blfaq011.htm

If you take the about.com example of 802.11g getting around 20Mbps - then
this should more than suffice for the average, small home network. Even for
streaming high quality video/audio.

Some wireless devices (and I'm thinking of the wireless modem/routers in
particular here) have built-in 10/100 hub/switches. So, I guess the thing to
do if you are thinking of going down the wireless route, and you want to
optimise your network for speed, is to only go wireless for the devices that
you *have* to have wireless. (Sounds a little obvious!)
So, if you can hard-wire your PCs into the hub/switch, then do it.
If your PS2/XBox are too far away, then let them go wireless.

HTH

Baz


  #6  
Old April 5th 04, 11:56 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Richard Tobin
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 273
Default Speed of Wireless

In article ,
Albrow, Sam J wrote:

If a typical switch can deal with transfers of up to 10Mb or 100Mb,
what can a wireless switch or router deal with?


100 on the fixed network (but will be compatible with products that work at
10), and then whatever the standard supports wireless - i.e. 54 if its
802.11g.


Not in practice unfortunately. You can really get close to 100Mb/s
out of a wired network, but I have never seen more than 6Mb/s on 11b,
and from reviews I have read the best with 11g is around 15-20Mb/s.

Don't believe what the system tells you, measure it yourself with the
protocols you actually use.

-- Richard
  #7  
Old April 5th 04, 11:59 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Richard Tobin
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 273
Default Speed of Wireless

In article ,
Baz wrote:

Likewise, home users may connect their PCs via hubs, and not via full-duplex
switches.


It's getting hard to buy a real hub these days. Buy something
advertised as a 4-port hub for 20 and it turns out to a switch...

-- Richard
 




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
very poor speed Gavin uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) 0 February 16th 04 06:06 PM
Speed problems Fry uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) 1 January 17th 04 06:21 PM
Connection speed Peter Seddon uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) 1 January 2nd 04 03:37 PM
Speed ID: 29 uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) 11 August 29th 03 02:11 PM
Speed - thanks. Kevin Sanigar uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) 0 August 26th 03 07:20 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 11:23 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 2.4.0
Copyright 2004-2019 BroadbanterBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.