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uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

Advice on setting up a home network to share broadband



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 19th 04, 12:17 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Graham Daniels
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3
Default Advice on setting up a home network to share broadband

Hi,

My exchange is set to be enabled for ADSL on 1st Sept. At present I have
Home Highway with a 100Mbit switch sitting in the garage serving the other
PCs in the house through CAT5. The other machines all have ethernet cards in
them. The machine with the ISDN card is running XP Home. How can I best
continue this setup when broadband arrives?

I have seen talk of a router. Do I need one of these or can it be done with
my existing switch?

Thanks for your help

Graham



  #2  
Old May 19th 04, 12:21 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Linker3000
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 108
Default Advice on setting up a home network to share broadband

Graham Daniels wrote:

Hi,

My exchange is set to be enabled for ADSL on 1st Sept. At present I have
Home Highway with a 100Mbit switch sitting in the garage serving the other
PCs in the house through CAT5. The other machines all have ethernet cards in
them. The machine with the ISDN card is running XP Home. How can I best
continue this setup when broadband arrives?

I have seen talk of a router. Do I need one of these or can it be done with
my existing switch?

Thanks for your help

Graham



Get yerself a router with built-in firewall - one with a single UTP port
will do as you already have the switch (unless you need the spare ports).

Heading over to ebuyer.co.uk and reading some reviews would be a good start.

Have fun
  #3  
Old May 19th 04, 06:58 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
dave
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 13
Default Advice on setting up a home network to share broadband


Get yerself a router with built-in firewall - one with a single UTP port
will do as you already have the switch (unless you need the spare ports).

Heading over to ebuyer.co.uk and reading some reviews would be a good start.

Have fun


In the past two weeks have installed 2 x ASR8000 from ebuyer, its a single
poet ADSL modem/router and they installed and worked fine. Not bad for
approx 22.

Dave

  #4  
Old May 19th 04, 10:54 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Tiscali Tim
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 755
Default Advice on setting up a home network to share broadband

In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
Graham Daniels wrote:

Hi,

My exchange is set to be enabled for ADSL on 1st Sept. At present I
have Home Highway with a 100Mbit switch sitting in the garage serving
the other PCs in the house through CAT5. The other machines all have
ethernet cards in them. The machine with the ISDN card is running XP
Home. How can I best continue this setup when broadband arrives?

I have seen talk of a router. Do I need one of these or can it be
done with my existing switch?

Thanks for your help

Graham


As others have said, a single port ADSL modem/router/firewall connected into
your existing switch is probably the best bet.

I'm not totally clear as to your current setup. Am I right in assuming that
you have an internal ISDN card and a separate external ethernet switch/hub
(as opposed to an integrated ISDN router with multiple ports)? Is your
current ISDN-based internet connection shared? If so how? Assuming that you
don't have a hardware router, you must already have the equivalent of a
router implemeted in software - maybe using ICS, or software such as
WinRoute?

If so, the least change solution would be to swap your ISDN card for an ADSL
modem and otherwise continue the way you are. This would at least provide a
cheap short-term solution - particularly if you get a "free" ADSL modem as
part of your broadband setup.

I am currently connected using an old W98 PC running WinRoute - into which I
have installed an internal ADSL PCI card which I bought cheap on Ebay. This
has worked fine for several weeks, but I now have a wireless router on
order. This will enable me to turn the old computer off (because that's all
it's used for) and will hopefully(!) allow me to sit in the garden with my
laptop, and surf the net.

Be aware that your ISDN line has to be reverted to a standard PSTN line
before ADSL can be enabled - and that it just *might* fail the line test. I
would advise using an ADSL ISP who offers a managed conversion (such as
PlusNet - but there are others) so that, if the worst happens, ISDN will be
re-installed at no cost to you. [If you want the gory details, see the
thread entitled ("Managed Home Highway to ADSL Conversion" which I started
on 13th May]
--
Cheers,
Tim
______
Please reply to newsgroup. Reply address is Black Hole!


  #5  
Old May 20th 04, 01:26 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Philip Wagstaff
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 14
Default Advice on setting up a home network to share broadband

I share my ADSL (USB modem 23) and my files and printers, between two
computers using a 3m twisted pair (not patch) cable (B&Q 1.39), one
ethernet card in each machine, using XP's inbuilt ICS programme, (turn off
the XP firewall) and use free firewall software. It's the software that
takes time to set correctly. V simple, v cheap, v good.


My exchange is set to be enabled for ADSL on 1st Sept. At present I have
Home Highway with a 100Mbit switch sitting in the garage serving the other
PCs in the house through CAT5. The other machines all have ethernet cards

in
them. The machine with the ISDN card is running XP Home. How can I best
continue this setup when broadband arrives?

I have seen talk of a router. Do I need one of these or can it be done

with
my existing switch?

Thanks for your help

Graham





  #6  
Old May 20th 04, 10:19 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Tiscali Tim
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 755
Default Advice on setting up a home network to share broadband

In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
Philip Wagstaff wrote:


My exchange is set to be enabled for ADSL on 1st Sept. At present I
have Home Highway with a 100Mbit switch sitting in the garage
serving the other PCs in the house through CAT5. The other machines
all have ethernet cards in them. The machine with the ISDN card is
running XP Home. How can I best continue this setup when broadband
arrives?

I have seen talk of a router. Do I need one of these or can it be
done with my existing switch?

Thanks for your help

Graham


I share my ADSL (USB modem 23) and my files and printers, between two
computers using a 3m twisted pair (not patch) cable (B&Q 1.39), one
ethernet card in each machine, using XP's inbuilt ICS programme,
(turn off the XP firewall) and use free firewall software. It's the
software that takes time to set correctly. V simple, v cheap, v good.


That's fine for *two* computers - but needs additional kit (hub etc.) if
there are more than two - as in the OP's case.
--
Cheers,
Tim
______
Please reply to newsgroup. Reply address is Black Hole!


  #7  
Old May 20th 04, 09:53 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Graham Daniels
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3
Default Advice on setting up a home network to share broadband

Tim,

Yes, you are right, the 'gateway' machine has an ISDN card and a separate
ethernet card connected to the switch in the garage. The ISDN is shared via
Windows ICS.
Swapping the ISDN card for the ADSL modem seems best as the switch is some
distance away and connecting the router to the switch would be difficult
(unless I could use
the CAT5 cable that currently goes form the ethernet card in the gateway
machine to the switch.

I'm still unclear whethter a router would be better than swaping ISDN for
ADSL modem. What does a router do that ICS and a software firewall don't? In
the near future the network will consist of 4 PCs - would every one of these
need a connection to the router, and would the router need to be connected
directly into the ADSL line? (impossible as phone line/Home highway box is
in study whilst router sits in garage)

Rather confused, but thanks for your response,

Graham




"Tiscali Tim" wrote in message
...
In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
Graham Daniels wrote:

Hi,

My exchange is set to be enabled for ADSL on 1st Sept. At present I
have Home Highway with a 100Mbit switch sitting in the garage serving
the other PCs in the house through CAT5. The other machines all have
ethernet cards in them. The machine with the ISDN card is running XP
Home. How can I best continue this setup when broadband arrives?

I have seen talk of a router. Do I need one of these or can it be
done with my existing switch?

Thanks for your help

Graham


As others have said, a single port ADSL modem/router/firewall connected

into
your existing switch is probably the best bet.

I'm not totally clear as to your current setup. Am I right in assuming

that
you have an internal ISDN card and a separate external ethernet switch/hub
(as opposed to an integrated ISDN router with multiple ports)? Is your
current ISDN-based internet connection shared? If so how? Assuming that

you
don't have a hardware router, you must already have the equivalent of a
router implemeted in software - maybe using ICS, or software such as
WinRoute?

If so, the least change solution would be to swap your ISDN card for an

ADSL
modem and otherwise continue the way you are. This would at least provide

a
cheap short-term solution - particularly if you get a "free" ADSL modem as
part of your broadband setup.

I am currently connected using an old W98 PC running WinRoute - into which

I
have installed an internal ADSL PCI card which I bought cheap on Ebay.

This
has worked fine for several weeks, but I now have a wireless router on
order. This will enable me to turn the old computer off (because that's

all
it's used for) and will hopefully(!) allow me to sit in the garden with my
laptop, and surf the net.

Be aware that your ISDN line has to be reverted to a standard PSTN line
before ADSL can be enabled - and that it just *might* fail the line test.

I
would advise using an ADSL ISP who offers a managed conversion (such as
PlusNet - but there are others) so that, if the worst happens, ISDN will

be
re-installed at no cost to you. [If you want the gory details, see the
thread entitled ("Managed Home Highway to ADSL Conversion" which I started
on 13th May]
--
Cheers,
Tim
______
Please reply to newsgroup. Reply address is Black Hole!




  #8  
Old May 20th 04, 11:04 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Tiscali Tim
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 755
Default Advice on setting up a home network to share broadband

In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
Graham Daniels wrote:

Tim,

Yes, you are right, the 'gateway' machine has an ISDN card and a
separate ethernet card connected to the switch in the garage. The
ISDN is shared via Windows ICS.
Swapping the ISDN card for the ADSL modem seems best as the switch is
some distance away and connecting the router to the switch would be
difficult (unless I could use
the CAT5 cable that currently goes form the ethernet card in the
gateway machine to the switch.

I'm still unclear whethter a router would be better than swaping ISDN
for ADSL modem. What does a router do that ICS and a software
firewall don't? In the near future the network will consist of 4 PCs
- would every one of these need a connection to the router, and would
the router need to be connected directly into the ADSL line?
(impossible as phone line/Home highway box is in study whilst router
sits in garage)

Rather confused, but thanks for your response,

Graham


Some people certainly extol the virtues of hardware firewalls (incorporated
into hardware routers) rather than using software firewalls. I will leave
them to expand on the details - but one oft-quoted feature is that a PC with
a software firewall is potentially vulnerable whilst booting up, if the
internet connection is established before the firewall is operational. [I
personally believe in using hardware *and* software firewalls - because only
a software firewall will monitor *outgoing* traffic - and check that it's
pukka and not being generated by a trojan.

To come back to your setup, if you want to use a router, you have several
options:

1. Install a mult-port router in place of your current switch, and throw
away the latter. If, because of the constraints of your current wiring, this
means that the router would have to go in the garage, you would also need an
ADSL connection in the garage, near to the router. You would probably have
to run a phone extension to the garage for the purpose.

2. Use a single port router, and install it where your HH box is currently
situated. Use a single ethernet cable to connect this to your existing
switch. This would automatically share the connection with all the PCs
connected to the switch. [If you use the cable which currently connects your
study PC to the switch for this purpose, this PC would no longer be
connected to the switch - PROBLEM! (Solved by Option 3)

3. Install a multi-port router in the study, but use only 2 ports on this -
and use it in conjunction with your current switch. One of the ports would
be connected to the current switch - using the cable which currently
connects the study PC. The other port would connect direct to the study PC,
using just a short cable.

With any of the above, you would need to disable ICS and configure all the
PCs to use the router as their internet gateway.

Hope this removes some of the confusion!
--
Cheers,
Tim
______
Please reply to newsgroup. Reply address is Black Hole!


  #9  
Old May 21st 04, 12:03 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Graham Daniels
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3
Default Advice on setting up a home network to share broadband

Tim,

With your option 3, would it mean that all PCs on the network could 'see'
each other, share files+printers, play games etc?

Also are there any performance issues for the PCs connecting to the router
through the switch.

I assume that the router therefore has one port connectd to BT ADSL box on
wall, one port connected to study PC, and one port connected to the switch.

Thanks for your help

Less confused,
Graham







"Tiscali Tim" wrote in message
...
In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
Graham Daniels wrote:

Tim,

Yes, you are right, the 'gateway' machine has an ISDN card and a
separate ethernet card connected to the switch in the garage. The
ISDN is shared via Windows ICS.
Swapping the ISDN card for the ADSL modem seems best as the switch is
some distance away and connecting the router to the switch would be
difficult (unless I could use
the CAT5 cable that currently goes form the ethernet card in the
gateway machine to the switch.

I'm still unclear whethter a router would be better than swaping ISDN
for ADSL modem. What does a router do that ICS and a software
firewall don't? In the near future the network will consist of 4 PCs
- would every one of these need a connection to the router, and would
the router need to be connected directly into the ADSL line?
(impossible as phone line/Home highway box is in study whilst router
sits in garage)

Rather confused, but thanks for your response,

Graham


Some people certainly extol the virtues of hardware firewalls

(incorporated
into hardware routers) rather than using software firewalls. I will leave
them to expand on the details - but one oft-quoted feature is that a PC

with
a software firewall is potentially vulnerable whilst booting up, if the
internet connection is established before the firewall is operational. [I
personally believe in using hardware *and* software firewalls - because

only
a software firewall will monitor *outgoing* traffic - and check that it's
pukka and not being generated by a trojan.

To come back to your setup, if you want to use a router, you have several
options:

1. Install a mult-port router in place of your current switch, and throw
away the latter. If, because of the constraints of your current wiring,

this
means that the router would have to go in the garage, you would also need

an
ADSL connection in the garage, near to the router. You would probably have
to run a phone extension to the garage for the purpose.

2. Use a single port router, and install it where your HH box is currently
situated. Use a single ethernet cable to connect this to your existing
switch. This would automatically share the connection with all the PCs
connected to the switch. [If you use the cable which currently connects

your
study PC to the switch for this purpose, this PC would no longer be
connected to the switch - PROBLEM! (Solved by Option 3)

3. Install a multi-port router in the study, but use only 2 ports on

this -
and use it in conjunction with your current switch. One of the ports would
be connected to the current switch - using the cable which currently
connects the study PC. The other port would connect direct to the study

PC,
using just a short cable.

With any of the above, you would need to disable ICS and configure all the
PCs to use the router as their internet gateway.

Hope this removes some of the confusion!
--
Cheers,
Tim
______
Please reply to newsgroup. Reply address is Black Hole!




  #10  
Old May 21st 04, 01:30 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Tiscali Tim
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 755
Default Advice on setting up a home network to share broadband

In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
Graham Daniels wrote:

Tim,

With your option 3, would it mean that all PCs on the network could
'see' each other, share files+printers, play games etc?


Yes


Also are there any performance issues for the PCs connecting to the
router through the switch.


Only that the bandwidth of the internet connection is *shared* - so if
they're all downloading at the same time, they each get only part of the
bandwidth. But that is true however you share it.

As far as your network goes (for sharing files & printers locally) it
doesn't really matter for a small network whether you have one or two
switches (and the router can be considered as an additional switch for local
traffic). The only issue I can think of is if the switch is only 10MHz but
the PCs have 10/100MHz network cards (and a new router would be 100MHz)
local traffic would be faster if the router were the only switch. Other than
that, no difference. Hope that makes sense!

I assume that the router therefore has one port connectd to BT ADSL
box on wall, one port connected to study PC, and one port connected
to the switch.


In essence, yes. The ADSL port is a different sort of port, but the other
two are standard ethernet ports.


Thanks for your help

Less confused,
Graham


[My 3-Com wireless router arrived today, and I have set it up tonight (so
far for wired only). Because I need to revise my cable layouts, I've
currently got a lash-up with some PCs connected directly to the router, and
some connected via my old hub. No problem whatsoever. Tomorrow (or really
later today, because it's now after midnight) I shall have a go at the
wireless bit - and see if I can get the laptop working in the garden!]

--
Cheers,
Tim
______
Please reply to newsgroup. Reply address is Black Hole!


 




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