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uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

Some advice please . .



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 2nd 04, 05:36 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
daibhidh
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default Some advice please . .

Hello kind folks of u.t.broadband.....

My exchange (Stornoway) has recently been ADSL'd, giving me the option of
changing how I access the internet. However, due to the way my current
set-up is organised, I haven't got a clue which of the million or so options
open to me would be best; so I thought I'd ask here and see what the wealth
of experience on this newsgroup can come up with.

Here's how my stuff is set up at the moment.

I've got four PCs (two WinXP, one Win98, one Debian Linux) all networked
(wired network) and connected to BT HomeHighway through an ancient Compaq
Microcom ISDN Router. It all works pretty well, but my main reasons for
wanting broadband are :

1) Cost - HH is really expensive for a 150 hour-per-month service.
2) Speed - I've got the router setup to only connect at 60Kbps, to try and
save on those precious hours.
3) Monthly Limits - Even with my router set to disconnect automatically
after 30 seconds of inactivity, I'm *constantly* going over my 150 hours,
and having to connect through back-up ISPs

I figure that for a similar (or less) monthly cost, I can get rid of the
speed and time-limit problems. I've also got a couple of other problems.

1) My network - From what I understand, all of the "modems" that come with
the broadband offerings from the main ISPs are just fairly dumb USB
windows-based things that I wouldn't be able to just plug into my network.
At the moment, my router also works as a DHCP server, making all of my
network stuff operate pretty simple. I'd like to replace it with a
"broadband" equivalent, but don't want to spend a fortune. Is this possible?

2) The phone numbers - The two numbers from HH have been used for a home
number and a business number, so I'd need to keep at the very least the
business number, and get a separate new line for the home number. Can I keep
either of these numbers as they are at present?

Sorry for the probably quite dumb questions, but I never thought it'd be so
difficult to find this stuff out.

Thanks folks,
David


  #2  
Old June 2nd 04, 06:16 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Gus
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 40
Default Some advice please . .


I'm in a similar position (re. the spending a fortune part), and I came
across a couple of ethernet modem/routers from ebuyer.co.uk, which are
actually made by Origo. The one-port version is around 18 + VAT and
delivery, and the 4-port version 38. Both do DHCP and NAT. They seem to
be fairly well thought of AFAIK; I've just ordered the 4-port model,
anyway.

Spec for 1-port model is he

http://www.origo2000.com/show-prds.php?ID_NUM=56



1. That router has problems with DCHP, its been found that Windows XP has
problems pulling an IP from the router when its rebooted or the lease time
has expired. Only cure is rebooting the PC.

2. Buggy Firmwa
- latest has a SPI firewall which is more of a problem than its worth,
telnet/remote connections/MSN all will loose connection regularly cause of
it.
- You risking breaking the router trying to install it, leaving you with
either fixing it your self or sending it back to where ever you bought it
from. Considering your location the p&p will be steep so not an option
- the fix will void the warranty which needs a pc that can boot in dos and
still be able to use its USB port, not _all_ motherboards support this.

So there's cheap and too cheap. without knowing your price range I would
recommend you get something a bit more decent with a proven track record. so
have a look at the reviews and forums on http://www.adslguide.org.uk/


  #3  
Old June 2nd 04, 06:19 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
daibhidh
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default Some advice please . .

"Gus" wrote in message
...
Considering your location the p&p will be steep so not an option


You're right there - I've bought stuff from ebuyer before, and they charge
19.99 postage to Lewis.

Thanks for the info (both Gus and Tim).
David


  #5  
Old June 2nd 04, 07:06 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Gus
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 40
Default Some advice please . .

well I own one and used to post on the UK support forum but gave up on
there, when they recently started to charge for those that send routers
directly back to them and not the supplier while still under warranty to get
fixed.

http://www.adsltech.com/

Personally I'm looking at replacing it with a Vigor 2600plus or 2600V just
waiting until I can afford one.


  #6  
Old June 2nd 04, 09:02 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Tiscali Tim
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 755
Default Some advice please . .

In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
daibhidh wrote:

Hello kind folks of u.t.broadband.....

My exchange (Stornoway) has recently been ADSL'd, giving me the
option of changing how I access the internet. However, due to the way
my current set-up is organised, I haven't got a clue which of the
million or so options open to me would be best; so I thought I'd ask
here and see what the wealth of experience on this newsgroup can come
up with.

Here's how my stuff is set up at the moment.

I've got four PCs (two WinXP, one Win98, one Debian Linux) all
networked (wired network) and connected to BT HomeHighway through an
ancient Compaq Microcom ISDN Router. It all works pretty well, but my
main reasons for wanting broadband are :

1) Cost - HH is really expensive for a 150 hour-per-month service.
2) Speed - I've got the router setup to only connect at 60Kbps, to
try and save on those precious hours.
3) Monthly Limits - Even with my router set to disconnect
automatically after 30 seconds of inactivity, I'm *constantly* going
over my 150 hours, and having to connect through back-up ISPs

I figure that for a similar (or less) monthly cost, I can get rid of
the speed and time-limit problems. I've also got a couple of other
problems.

1) My network - From what I understand, all of the "modems" that come
with the broadband offerings from the main ISPs are just fairly dumb
USB windows-based things that I wouldn't be able to just plug into my
network. At the moment, my router also works as a DHCP server, making
all of my network stuff operate pretty simple. I'd like to replace it
with a "broadband" equivalent, but don't want to spend a fortune. Is
this possible?

2) The phone numbers - The two numbers from HH have been used for a
home number and a business number, so I'd need to keep at the very
least the business number, and get a separate new line for the home
number. Can I keep either of these numbers as they are at present?

Sorry for the probably quite dumb questions, but I never thought it'd
be so difficult to find this stuff out.

Thanks folks,
David


The "standard" solution would be to replace your ISDN router with a combined
ADSL modem/router/firewall. The device sold by Solwise
http://www.solwise.co.uk/modems.htm#304TA for under 40 quid looks as if it
should do the job ok.

In most domestic circumstances, going from Home Highway to ADSL actually
*saves* on running costs (once you have paid the conversion and setup
costs). In round figures, you save 15 quid per month by having a standard
phone line rather than HH and you save your internet call charges (or flat
rate monthly fee). That usually leaves more than enough to pay for the
monthly subscription for a 512k ADSL service.

BUT your situation is a bit different in that you appear to need two phone
lines. Do you actually need to use both of these at the same time, or do you
simply need two numbers?

If the latter, you could use BT Call Sign which gives 2 numbers - each with
a distinctive ring - so you can tell whether it's the "home" or "business"
phone ringing. You can even get a switch which detects the ring flavour and
switches to a different handset depending on which number was called.

If you *do* need to use both phones at the same time, you really need a
second PSTN line - which is going to cost 11 quid per month in rental on top
of the installation charge. You just *might* be able to get one of the
redundant HH numbers assigned to it. [Getting the main number assigned to
the line which is downgraded from HH to PSTN is not a problem, it's the
default].

To avoid a second physical line, you could consider Broadband Voice which -
for about 7 quid per month (I think) - gives you a virtual voice line over
ADSL. You certainly won't be able to transfer an existing number to this
because it uses a different range (05xxx I think).

How about a totally different solution?

How much of a limitaion is the 64k provided by a single ISDN channel? How
much are you paying for your 150 hours per month? If you can live with 64k,
and are paying an arm and a leg for your 150 hours, why not switch to a
service which has no limit? Until recently upgrading to ADSL, I was using HH
with Freeserve Anytime at 15 quid per month - with *no limit* on connection
hours. [It's even cheaper to new customers for the first few months].

You could keep all your existing kit, would avoid the 50 quid downgrade fee
for HH to PSTN and the ADSL activation fee, and it would probably cost no
more per month than your current limited service - especially if you are
having to top up the 150 hours with paid calls.

Is this your solution?
--
Cheers,
Tim
______
Please reply to newsgroup. Reply address is invalid.



  #7  
Old June 3rd 04, 01:56 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Dominic
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 149
Default Some advice please . .

"Tim Hodgson" wrote in message
...
Gus wrote:

well I own one and used to post on the UK support forum but gave up on
there, when they recently started to charge for those that send routers
directly back to them and not the supplier while still under warranty to

get
fixed.


Hmm...

Personally I'm looking at replacing it with a Vigor 2600plus or 2600V

just
waiting until I can afford one.


Very nice too, but price-wise, that's the other extreme! Thanks for the
info; I'll probably go ahead and risk the Origo anyway, since the
nearest alternatives are a *lot* more expensive (though as you suggest,
there may be a good reason for that.)


I use that Origo at home, and it has never been a problem. Feel free to send
me an email if you do have difficulties, I might be able to help.

Regards
Dominic

------
ICBroadband Tech Support - working for you 24 hours a day, 365 days a year
www.icbroadband.com/support
24 hour service status information telephone: 0870 760 5933


  #8  
Old June 3rd 04, 07:00 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Daibhidh
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Some advice please . .

"Tiscali Tim" wrote in message
...

The "standard" solution would be to replace your ISDN router with a

combined
ADSL modem/router/firewall. The device sold by Solwise
http://www.solwise.co.uk/modems.htm#304TA for under 40 quid looks as if it
should do the job ok.


Thanks for that info. I didn't think something to do with PCs, networking
and the internet could *really* be as simple as buying a direct replacement
for my ISDN router; but it seems it is. Cheers.

In most domestic circumstances, going from Home Highway to ADSL actually
*saves* on running costs (once you have paid the conversion and setup


Aye - according to my back-of-envelope calculations, it should save me
around 20 quid per month in total. And give me a nice, shiny new connection.

... you could use BT Call Sign ...


Hmmm. I quite like the sound of that, actually. It's more just the numbers
than the lines themselves. What I was most worried about was that I'd lose
the current number on the HH service that's been being used as a business
number for a wee while now, which obviously would be a fairly large pain in
the backside. This isn't the main HH number; does that cause a problem for
the conversion, or can I pick any of the three?

How about a totally different solution?
...


Again, another pretty sensible suggestion. The thing is though, I've got my
heart set on a faster connection. And with your Call Sign suggestion, I can
have a substantially faster connection for a few quid less per month. Which
is nice.

Thanks for your help.


  #9  
Old June 3rd 04, 10:16 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Tiscali Tim
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 755
Default Some advice please . .

In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
Daibhidh wrote:


... you could use BT Call Sign ...


Hmmm. I quite like the sound of that, actually. It's more just the
numbers than the lines themselves. What I was most worried about was
that I'd lose the current number on the HH service that's been being
used as a business number for a wee while now, which obviously would
be a fairly large pain in the backside. This isn't the main HH
number; does that cause a problem for the conversion, or can I pick
any of the three?

In theory, you can certainly pick either of the 2 analog numbers (not sure
about the digital number) and BT will do their best to oblige. There's an
outsode chance that it may not be possible because of technical issues,
which I don't fully understand, but is something to do with the number
ranges available on whichever rack your PSTN line ends up being connected
to.

There's a very good chance that you, if you use Call Sign, you should be
able to retain both of your analog numbers. Does it really matter which is
the primary number?
--
Cheers,
Tim
______
Please reply to newsgroup. Reply address is invalid.


  #10  
Old June 8th 04, 10:12 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Keef
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default Some advice please . .

There's a very good chance that you, if you use Call Sign, you should be
able to retain both of your analog numbers. Does it really matter which is
the primary number?


If it DOES matter which is the primary number, make sure you sort this out
first.

I got callsign and a number transferred from NTL to BT and they insist that
my
NTL number is the primary number and not the BT one we've had for over 20
years. Of course things like directory information now come up with the
"wrong"
number! :-(

Interestingly BT accepted an ADSL application on the old number, but don't
know if this will cause problems should I move the "new" number back to NTL
in the future?

Keef

--
Dartford Kent UK
Email
(Reply or Remove the WRAPPER)


 




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