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Linux and routers



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 3rd 04, 09:36 PM posted to uk.comp.os.linux,uk.telecom.broadband
Nick Leverton
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 101
Default Linux and routers

In article ,
Michael Rozdoba wrote:

I'm still happy with my Solwise sar715. I use NAT & haven't had any
significant problems with a small home lan of five machines. The 715
does DHCP for the lan (leasing addresses based on MAC) & also provides
local DNS. I've not used the firewall, relying on NAT for security, as I
don't run any externally accessible services (usually), but I understand
it provides useful, if basic, functionality.


Is there a cheap DSL ethernet router that works basically as a bridge ?
My AR11 insists on occupying one of my seven IP addresses, and makes
me set up every port or IP forwarding by hand (since I run another
firewall/router on the Linux server which lies behind it). Or at least
if the AR11 can do otherwise than NATted PPPoA or than dynamic forwarding
only to its local port address, Taiwanese support won't tell me, and
cos I work from here I can't spare the downtime to experiment.

I want (and I have a family of teenagers with net access wants too )
to to be able to run P2P and netchat and maybe FTP and all that stuff
that wants any of a range of incoming ports, as long as _I_ control the
accesses, the rate and port ranges of dynamic forwards, and the bandwidth
(and it seems to be not too hard to do that with ipchains), as well as
avoiding all that tedious messing around NATting into private netspaces
just for the server/adsl hop.

Budget is a maximum of about 50 quid for something ... to be offset by
swap-or-selling a DSL router and a plain one ... just wish I'd bought
an AR41 when they cost less than this AR11 did, init :-)

uk.t.b added since it's probably also on-topic, please keep followups
though (ObLinux: knode users watch out ;-))

Nick
--
"My objective at this stage was to work about 3 days per week"
-- Richard Parker in http://web.ukonline.co.uk/richard/cv78.html
  #2  
Old July 3rd 04, 10:49 PM posted to uk.comp.os.linux,uk.telecom.broadband
Michael Rozdoba
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Linux and routers

Nick Leverton wrote:

Is there a cheap DSL ethernet router that works basically as a bridge ?


The sar715 can certainly do that. Don't know about the other models.
They have quite a few around the 50ukp price mark:
http://www.solwise.co.uk/modems.htm

--
Michael
m r o z a t u k g a t e w a y d o t n e t
  #3  
Old July 4th 04, 01:49 AM posted to uk.comp.os.linux,uk.telecom.broadband
Adam
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9
Default Linux and routers

On Sat, 03 Jul 2004 20:36:41 +0000, Nick Leverton wrote:

In article , Michael Rozdoba
wrote:

I'm still happy with my Solwise sar715. I use NAT & haven't had any
significant problems with a small home lan of five machines. The 715 does
DHCP for the lan (leasing addresses based on MAC) & also provides local
DNS. I've not used the firewall, relying on NAT for security, as I don't
run any externally accessible services (usually), but I understand it
provides useful, if basic, functionality.


Is there a cheap DSL ethernet router that works basically as a bridge ? My
AR11 insists on occupying one of my seven IP addresses, and makes me set
up every port or IP forwarding by hand (since I run another
firewall/router on the Linux server which lies behind it). Or at least if


snip a big message that I didn't fully read

I have the DLINK 300G+, I don't have NAT (I was sure that I wanted to
avoid a cheap and potentially ****ty implementation of NAT).

I have 8 IP's from Zen..

My gateway Linux-gw has one IP address- it's default gateway is the
broadcast address of the subnet

The other computers have public addresses but route via the linux-gw so
they are all firewalled off and without NAT.


--
Regards,
Adam Allen.

PGP: http://pgp.mit.edu:11371/pks/lookup?...e.net&op=index

  #4  
Old July 5th 04, 09:40 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
James Hill
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 20
Default Linux and routers

Is there a cheap DSL ethernet router that works basically as a bridge ? My
AR11 insists on occupying one of my seven IP addresses, and makes me set
up every port or IP forwarding by hand (since I run another
firewall/router on the Linux server which lies behind it). Or at least if


snip a big message that I didn't fully read

I have the DLINK 300G+, I don't have NAT (I was sure that I wanted to
avoid a cheap and potentially ****ty implementation of NAT).

I have 8 IP's from Zen..

My gateway Linux-gw has one IP address- it's default gateway is the
broadcast address of the subnet

The other computers have public addresses but route via the linux-gw so
they are all firewalled off and without NAT.


Hi,

Would you be able to post details on this (so I can possibly write a
guide)? I work at Zen, and wasn't aware that this setup was possible
with the D-link modem.

So just to confirm - if your subnet is 82.68.1.8/29, the default
gateway of your linux pc is 82.68.1.15, right?

I have a very similar setup myself at home, except I use the
speedtouch modem (has worked perfectly).

Regards,

James
  #5  
Old July 5th 04, 09:44 AM posted to uk.comp.os.linux,uk.telecom.broadband
James Hill
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 20
Default Linux and routers

A modem should be ideal for your purposes - I use the speedtouch 330
usb modem myself with no problems, and Adam has posted that he uses a
dlink 300G+ ethernet modem successfully elsewhere in this thread.

There's a discussion about this on the *PLUGPLUGPLUG* zen forums
(www.zensupport.co.uk) that you may find useful if you decide to go
down this route.

Regards,

James
  #6  
Old July 5th 04, 10:24 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Dave Reader
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 18
Default Linux and routers

James Hill wrote:
Is there a cheap DSL ethernet router that works basically as a bridge ? My
AR11 insists on occupying one of my seven IP addresses, and makes me set
up every port or IP forwarding by hand (since I run another
firewall/router on the Linux server which lies behind it). Or at least if


snip a big message that I didn't fully read

I have the DLINK 300G+, I don't have NAT (I was sure that I wanted to
avoid a cheap and potentially ****ty implementation of NAT).

I have 8 IP's from Zen..

My gateway Linux-gw has one IP address- it's default gateway is the
broadcast address of the subnet

The other computers have public addresses but route via the linux-gw so
they are all firewalled off and without NAT.


Hi,


Would you be able to post details on this (so I can possibly write a
guide)? I work at Zen, and wasn't aware that this setup was possible
with the D-link modem.


So just to confirm - if your subnet is 82.68.1.8/29, the default
gateway of your linux pc is 82.68.1.15, right?


I have a very similar setup myself at home, except I use the
speedtouch modem (has worked perfectly).


James,

I suspect the clue is in the original article "My gateway Linux-gw has one
IP address".

The obvious way to achieve this is to use Linux-gw as a firewalling
bridge.

If that's the case, the line "The other computers ... route via the
linux-gw" is misleading - they'll be connected via the bridge, but routing
via the router..

d.

  #7  
Old July 5th 04, 10:29 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
James Hill
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 20
Default Linux and routers


James,

I suspect the clue is in the original article "My gateway Linux-gw has one
IP address".

The obvious way to achieve this is to use Linux-gw as a firewalling
bridge.

If that's the case, the line "The other computers ... route via the
linux-gw" is misleading - they'll be connected via the bridge, but routing
via the router..

d.


*Nod.

This is what my PC at home does with the 330. I wasn't aware that the
dlink 300 would support this, as it does IP spoofing. I must have
incorrectly assumed that it ignored all traffic for other IP addresses
rather than it getting sent to the IP address of the PC using the
modem.

It is after all a modem designed to work with one pc only - so it was
understandable for me to assume it would drop all other traffic.

Regards,

James
  #8  
Old July 5th 04, 11:03 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Dave Reader
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 18
Default Linux and routers

James Hill wrote:

James,

I suspect the clue is in the original article "My gateway Linux-gw has one
IP address".

The obvious way to achieve this is to use Linux-gw as a firewalling
bridge.


*Nod.


This is what my PC at home does with the 330. I wasn't aware that the
dlink 300 would support this, as it does IP spoofing. I must have
incorrectly assumed that it ignored all traffic for other IP addresses
rather than it getting sent to the IP address of the PC using the
modem.


Hmm. OK, i'll concede that it looks a bit more complicated with that
particular device as it really isn't clear how it behaved from the
documentation I've been able to find.

d.

  #10  
Old July 5th 04, 12:27 PM posted to uk.comp.os.linux,uk.telecom.broadband
Neil Ellwood
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Linux and routers

On Mon, 05 Jul 2004 08:44:33 +0000, James Hill wrote:

A modem should be ideal for your purposes - I use the speedtouch 330
usb modem myself with no problems, and Adam has posted that he uses a
dlink 300G+ ethernet modem successfully elsewhere in this thread.

There's a discussion about this on the *PLUGPLUGPLUG* zen forums
(www.zensupport.co.uk) that you may find useful if you decide to go
down this route.

I use 300G+ as well, the only problems have been when I tried windows XP

--
neil
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