A Broadband and ADSL forum. BroadbanterBanter

Welcome to BroadbanterBanter.

You are currently viewing as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions and other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today.

Go Back   Home » BroadbanterBanter forum » Newsgroup Discussions » uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband)
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

Fitting a new telephone extension



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old July 15th 04, 02:27 PM posted to uk.telecom,uk.telecom.broadband
anth
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 15
Default Fitting a new telephone extension

I need to install a phone socket in the loft for ADSL (the modem etc will be
going up there) and for the same reason that I'm going to go wireless, I
don't want to run extensions through the house.

Also we'll be getting Sky soon and the master socket is in the wrong place
for that and that would mean running an extension round the living room and
dining room, which I don't want either.


So is the following possible?

Disconnect the master socket, drill a hole through the outside wall through
to the loft and pop the cable through there and reconnect the master socket
up there.

Then wire a new extension into the master socket (it's an NTE5) , pop it
back out the hole, run it down to where I'd like it, come back in through
the wall and fit a new extension.

I was thinking I would leave the original BT cable uncut so if we ever had
to run the master socket back downstairs (if we sell etc) it would only be a
5 minute job.

So are you allowed to play with the master socket in such a way? I presume
as long as it doesn't cause any problems BT wont care?

What cable would I use for the outside? I've seen extensions done this way
before but noticed it's a much thicker cable.


Thanks

Anth


  #2  
Old July 15th 04, 03:04 PM posted to uk.telecom,uk.telecom.broadband
sean
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 42
Default Fitting a new telephone extension

anth wrote:

I need to install a phone socket in the loft for ADSL (the modem etc will be
going up there) and for the same reason that I'm going to go wireless, I
don't want to run extensions through the house.

Also we'll be getting Sky soon and the master socket is in the wrong place
for that and that would mean running an extension round the living room and
dining room, which I don't want either.


So is the following possible?

Disconnect the master socket, drill a hole through the outside wall through
to the loft and pop the cable through there and reconnect the master socket
up there.

Then wire a new extension into the master socket (it's an NTE5) , pop it
back out the hole, run it down to where I'd like it, come back in through
the wall and fit a new extension.

I was thinking I would leave the original BT cable uncut so if we ever had
to run the master socket back downstairs (if we sell etc) it would only be a
5 minute job.

So are you allowed to play with the master socket in such a way? I presume
as long as it doesn't cause any problems BT wont care?

What cable would I use for the outside? I've seen extensions done this way
before but noticed it's a much thicker cable.


Thanks

Anth


You are not really allowed to tamper with the BT socket. We were told off for connecting
extensions into it. However if you do move it, make sure none of the cables get shorted as
this may blow something up at BT’s end, and they could fine you! Just be careful…
  #3  
Old July 15th 04, 03:22 PM posted to uk.telecom,uk.telecom.broadband
anth
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 15
Default Fitting a new telephone extension


"sean" -k wrote in message
...

snipped

You are not really allowed to tamper with the BT socket. We were told off

for connecting
extensions into it. However if you do move it, make sure none of the

cables get shorted as
this may blow something up at BT’s end, and they could fine you! Just be

careful…

Well as far as I'm aware you're allowed to wire extensions into an NTE5
(they're designed that way), it was moving the socket i'm more unsure about.

Anth


  #4  
Old July 15th 04, 03:36 PM posted to uk.telecom,uk.telecom.broadband
Tiscali Tim
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 755
Default Fitting a new telephone extension

In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
anth wrote:

I need to install a phone socket in the loft for ADSL (the modem etc
will be going up there) and for the same reason that I'm going to go
wireless, I don't want to run extensions through the house.

Also we'll be getting Sky soon and the master socket is in the wrong
place for that and that would mean running an extension round the
living room and dining room, which I don't want either.


So is the following possible?

Disconnect the master socket, drill a hole through the outside wall
through to the loft and pop the cable through there and reconnect the
master socket up there.

Then wire a new extension into the master socket (it's an NTE5) , pop
it back out the hole, run it down to where I'd like it, come back in
through the wall and fit a new extension.

I was thinking I would leave the original BT cable uncut so if we
ever had to run the master socket back downstairs (if we sell etc) it
would only be a 5 minute job.

So are you allowed to play with the master socket in such a way? I
presume as long as it doesn't cause any problems BT wont care?

What cable would I use for the outside? I've seen extensions done
this way before but noticed it's a much thicker cable.


Thanks

Anth


What you're suggesting is a *BAD* idea!

The master socket is the interface point between BT and you - they are
responsible for everything up to and including the master socket, and you
are responsible for extension wiring from the master onwards. In the event
of a fault, BT may well need to test the line at the master socket - to
determine whether the fault is in their bit or in yours. Whereas you might
get away with moving the master socket within the house - providing your
installation work looks like a BT job - you ain't going to get away with
moving it into the attic!

If you are planning to use micro-filters for your phones etc., the ADSL
connection can be made to *any* extension socket - it doesn't have to be
connected to the master. So you could get BT to move the master to where
your Sky box is to be, and then run your own extension up to the attic for
ADSL - going outside with the wire if you wish.

If you don't want to use micro-filters but to have a filtered faceplate
instead, buy one of the modified ones from Clarity [
http://www.clarity.it/telecoms/adsl_bits.htm ] and wire a digital extension
into the back of it.

If you're running either a normal phone extension or a digital extension
outside, you need to protect the cable (or use special cable?) because
ordinary cable doesn't like exposure to UV light - and will go brittle. I
have heard of people running their cables inside dummy (or maybe real?)
plastic drainpipes.
--
Cheers,
Tim
______
Please reply to newsgroup. Reply address is invalid.


  #5  
Old July 15th 04, 03:57 PM posted to uk.telecom,uk.telecom.broadband
anth
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 15
Default Fitting a new telephone extension


"Tiscali Tim" wrote in message
...
In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
anth wrote:

snipped


What you're suggesting is a *BAD* idea!

The master socket is the interface point between BT and you - they are
responsible for everything up to and including the master socket, and you
are responsible for extension wiring from the master onwards. In the event
of a fault, BT may well need to test the line at the master socket - to
determine whether the fault is in their bit or in yours. Whereas you might
get away with moving the master socket within the house - providing your
installation work looks like a BT job - you ain't going to get away with
moving it into the attic!

If you are planning to use micro-filters for your phones etc., the ADSL
connection can be made to *any* extension socket - it doesn't have to be
connected to the master. So you could get BT to move the master to where
your Sky box is to be, and then run your own extension up to the attic for
ADSL - going outside with the wire if you wish.

If you don't want to use micro-filters but to have a filtered faceplate
instead, buy one of the modified ones from Clarity [
http://www.clarity.it/telecoms/adsl_bits.htm ] and wire a digital

extension
into the back of it.

If you're running either a normal phone extension or a digital extension
outside, you need to protect the cable (or use special cable?) because
ordinary cable doesn't like exposure to UV light - and will go brittle. I
have heard of people running their cables inside dummy (or maybe real?)
plastic drainpipes.
--
Cheers,
Tim
______
Please reply to newsgroup. Reply address is invalid.



Well I was wanting the modem and router etc in the loft (and therefore an
extension) for neatness (the mrs wont be happy if I have more computer stuff
lying around) as well as practicality (my computer will be in the loft with
a wired connection, the kids can connect via wireless and I can use my work
laptop via wirelesses wherever I fancy).

The reason for moving the master socket was that it's cable goes past the
point where it would go into the loft but doesn't go as far as the point
where I want it to come into the house and regardless of the Sky issue it
seemed a bit daft to go down the wall just to wire a new extension going all
the way back up again.

As for the cable I'll have to have a look at my sisters when I go round to
hers next time and see if it has any markings on it. It's how hers was
done.

Does anyone know the going rate for a BT engineer to move the master socket?
I suppose while he was there I could get him to run the extension too.

Thanks

Anth


  #6  
Old July 15th 04, 09:18 PM posted to uk.telecom,uk.telecom.broadband
Rory
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4
Default Fitting a new telephone extension


"anth" wrote in message
...

"Tiscali Tim" wrote in message
...
In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
anth wrote:

snipped


What you're suggesting is a *BAD* idea!

The master socket is the interface point between BT and you - they are
responsible for everything up to and including the master socket, and

you
are responsible for extension wiring from the master onwards. In the

event
of a fault, BT may well need to test the line at the master socket - to
determine whether the fault is in their bit or in yours. Whereas you

might
get away with moving the master socket within the house - providing your
installation work looks like a BT job - you ain't going to get away with
moving it into the attic!

If you are planning to use micro-filters for your phones etc., the ADSL
connection can be made to *any* extension socket - it doesn't have to be
connected to the master. So you could get BT to move the master to where
your Sky box is to be, and then run your own extension up to the attic

for
ADSL - going outside with the wire if you wish.

If you don't want to use micro-filters but to have a filtered faceplate
instead, buy one of the modified ones from Clarity [
http://www.clarity.it/telecoms/adsl_bits.htm ] and wire a digital

extension
into the back of it.

If you're running either a normal phone extension or a digital extension
outside, you need to protect the cable (or use special cable?) because
ordinary cable doesn't like exposure to UV light - and will go brittle.

I
have heard of people running their cables inside dummy (or maybe real?)
plastic drainpipes.
--
Cheers,
Tim
______
Please reply to newsgroup. Reply address is invalid.



Well I was wanting the modem and router etc in the loft (and therefore an
extension) for neatness (the mrs wont be happy if I have more computer

stuff
lying around) as well as practicality (my computer will be in the loft

with
a wired connection, the kids can connect via wireless and I can use my

work
laptop via wirelesses wherever I fancy).

The reason for moving the master socket was that it's cable goes past the
point where it would go into the loft but doesn't go as far as the point
where I want it to come into the house and regardless of the Sky issue it
seemed a bit daft to go down the wall just to wire a new extension going

all
the way back up again.

As for the cable I'll have to have a look at my sisters when I go round to
hers next time and see if it has any markings on it. It's how hers was
done.

Does anyone know the going rate for a BT engineer to move the master

socket?
I suppose while he was there I could get him to run the extension too.

Thanks

Anth


Ok, just so we're clear,

You KNOW it's wrong to tamper with the sacred NTE.

Now that's out of the way, unscrew the bottom plate from the NTE. Within
their is your demarcation point (Imaginary line in sand drawn by BT and
which thou shalt not cross. **** 'em).
Remove next pair of screws. Note White/Blue wire in screw terminal 'A' and
Blue/White wire in screw terminal 'B'. Or vice-versa depending on BT
engineer's intake of Ritalin that day. Disconnect cable.
Remove 2 screws/1 screw/NTE backbox held to wall with double sided
tape/blu-tack/chewing gum....
Relocate cable to loft, do not cut cable down but keep the slack coiled up.
Terminate NTE as found.
On selling of house, repeat above steps in reverse or if you are in a
cavalier mood that day, climb the telegraph pole, cut off the dropwire and
deny all knowledge.
Under no circumstances lose any sleep about shorting any wires in any of the
above steps. It won't make the chairman's office explode and even if it did,
kudos to you sir. Just relocate NTE to original point and deny all
knowledge.

In short, just do it, using common sense. A happy wife is a stable life.

Best regards

Rory



  #7  
Old July 15th 04, 09:42 PM posted to uk.telecom,uk.telecom.broadband
Tiscali Tim
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 755
Default Fitting a new telephone extension

In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
Rory wrote:


In short, just do it, using common sense. A happy wife is a stable
life.


And pray that you never get any line faults which require a site visit by
BT.
--
Cheers,
Tim
______
Please reply to newsgroup. Reply address is invalid.


  #8  
Old July 15th 04, 09:53 PM posted to uk.telecom,uk.telecom.broadband
Rory
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4
Default Fitting a new telephone extension


"Rory" wrote in message
...

"anth" wrote in message
...

"Tiscali Tim" wrote in message
...
In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
anth wrote:

snipped


What you're suggesting is a *BAD* idea!

The master socket is the interface point between BT and you - they are
responsible for everything up to and including the master socket, and

you
are responsible for extension wiring from the master onwards. In the

event
of a fault, BT may well need to test the line at the master socket -

to
determine whether the fault is in their bit or in yours. Whereas you

might
get away with moving the master socket within the house - providing

your
installation work looks like a BT job - you ain't going to get away

with
moving it into the attic!

If you are planning to use micro-filters for your phones etc., the

ADSL
connection can be made to *any* extension socket - it doesn't have to

be
connected to the master. So you could get BT to move the master to

where
your Sky box is to be, and then run your own extension up to the attic

for
ADSL - going outside with the wire if you wish.

If you don't want to use micro-filters but to have a filtered

faceplate
instead, buy one of the modified ones from Clarity [
http://www.clarity.it/telecoms/adsl_bits.htm ] and wire a digital

extension
into the back of it.

If you're running either a normal phone extension or a digital

extension
outside, you need to protect the cable (or use special cable?) because
ordinary cable doesn't like exposure to UV light - and will go

brittle.
I
have heard of people running their cables inside dummy (or maybe

real?)
plastic drainpipes.
--
Cheers,
Tim
______
Please reply to newsgroup. Reply address is invalid.



Well I was wanting the modem and router etc in the loft (and therefore

an
extension) for neatness (the mrs wont be happy if I have more computer

stuff
lying around) as well as practicality (my computer will be in the loft

with
a wired connection, the kids can connect via wireless and I can use my

work
laptop via wirelesses wherever I fancy).

The reason for moving the master socket was that it's cable goes past

the
point where it would go into the loft but doesn't go as far as the point
where I want it to come into the house and regardless of the Sky issue

it
seemed a bit daft to go down the wall just to wire a new extension going

all
the way back up again.

As for the cable I'll have to have a look at my sisters when I go round

to
hers next time and see if it has any markings on it. It's how hers was
done.

Does anyone know the going rate for a BT engineer to move the master

socket?
I suppose while he was there I could get him to run the extension too.

Thanks

Anth


Ok, just so we're clear,

You KNOW it's wrong to tamper with the sacred NTE.

Now that's out of the way, unscrew the bottom plate from the NTE. Within
their is your demarcation point (Imaginary line in sand drawn by BT and
which thou shalt not cross. **** 'em).
Remove next pair of screws. Note White/Blue wire in screw terminal 'A' and
Blue/White wire in screw terminal 'B'. Or vice-versa depending on BT
engineer's intake of Ritalin that day. Disconnect cable.
Remove 2 screws/1 screw/NTE backbox held to wall with double sided
tape/blu-tack/chewing gum....
Relocate cable to loft, do not cut cable down but keep the slack coiled

up.
Terminate NTE as found.
On selling of house, repeat above steps in reverse or if you are in a
cavalier mood that day, climb the telegraph pole, cut off the dropwire and
deny all knowledge.
Under no circumstances lose any sleep about shorting any wires in any of

the
above steps. It won't make the chairman's office explode and even if it

did,
kudos to you sir. Just relocate NTE to original point and deny all
knowledge.

In short, just do it, using common sense. A happy wife is a stable life.

Best regards

Rory


Sorry, as regards to external cable, you are after CW1308BK (black 1308,
same as your internal cable but black. The black is carbon or somesuch stuff
in the insulation to make it impervious to UV damage. They do this to car
tyres also). The reason your incoming cable is thicker is because A: It is
DROPWIRE coming from a telegraph pole (contains strengthening members to
stop it stretching/breaking) or B: It is CW1128 DUCT CABLE (polythene sheath
and filled with petroleum jelly (i.e. Vaseline) to make it waterproof). Most
likely A if BT.

Best regards

Rory


  #9  
Old July 15th 04, 10:09 PM posted to uk.telecom,uk.telecom.broadband
Rory
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4
Default Fitting a new telephone extension


"Tiscali Tim" wrote in message
...
In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
Rory wrote:


In short, just do it, using common sense. A happy wife is a stable
life.


And pray that you never get any line faults which require a site visit by
BT.
--
Cheers,
Tim
______
Please reply to newsgroup. Reply address is invalid.


Or as ends CrimewatchUK 'don't have nightmares!'.

It's British Telecom; you make it sound like you will get dawn-raided by the
KGB.


  #10  
Old July 15th 04, 11:24 PM posted to uk.telecom,uk.telecom.broadband
dom
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3
Default Fitting a new telephone extension

"Tiscali Tim" wrote:
The master socket is the interface point between BT and you - they are
responsible for everything up to and including the master socket, and you
are responsible for extension wiring from the master onwards. In the event
of a fault, BT may well need to test the line at the master socket - to
determine whether the fault is in their bit or in yours. Whereas you might
get away with moving the master socket within the house - providing your
installation work looks like a BT job - you ain't going to get away with
moving it into the attic!


Why not? BT fitted all 3 master sockets in the loft at my parents house.
It might have been against the rules (long length of wire across the loft
before reaching the socket, etc...), but the bt technicians have always
seemed to be sensible about interpreting their rules. They also had
an 'engineer installed' adsl faceplate fitted to one of the lineboxes
in the loft with (as far as I know) no comment from bt.

I changed my master socket for as NTE linebox jobby (NTE box was
'recovered' from another house where two disused phone lines were
terminated *in the loft* with lineboxes).

Just be careful!

dom.

 




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Extension wiring. cw uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) 4 July 13th 04 07:23 PM
Broadband extension help Gameface uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) 4 May 4th 04 10:47 AM
Importance of telephone extension cable for 1mb broadband? tHatDudeUK uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) 4 February 29th 04 10:29 PM
Extension question Pollux uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) 2 February 26th 04 11:39 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 09:37 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 2.4.0
Copyright ©2004-2019 BroadbanterBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.