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uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

The definition of broadband ..... official !!



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 13th 04, 09:20 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Informer
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 50
Default The definition of broadband ..... official !!


"Tx2" wrote in message
...

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/3563320.stm


In my book broadband has a minimum speed of 512K. Companies like NTL that
flog slow 150K services and claim that is broadband are conning the
consumer.


  #2  
Old August 13th 04, 09:45 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
lurch
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Posts: 498
Default The definition of broadband ..... official !!

On Fri, 13 Aug 2004 20:20:05 +0100, "Informer"
strung together this:


"Tx2" wrote in message
t...

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/3563320.stm


In my book broadband has a minimum speed of 512K. Companies like NTL that
flog slow 150K services and claim that is broadband are conning the
consumer.

While we're on the subject, would anyone say that 8 64k ISDN lines
bonded together then used solely for internet access constituted
broadband?
--

SJW
A.C.S. Ltd
  #3  
Old August 14th 04, 03:15 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Dan
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 31
Default The definition of broadband ..... official !!

I read somewhere the true definition of broadband. "a line which can carry
many channels of infomation and is always connected" .

In my mind a broadband connection has to be always on and the speed not
restricting anything you do on the net.

I wouldn't class 512kbps as broadband. 1000kbps is the least I would
consider as broadband. In other countries I suppose this would be much
higher.
"Mugwump" wrote in message
...
In article , Lurch
said......

On Fri, 13 Aug 2004 20:20:05 +0100, "Informer"
strung together this:


"Tx2" wrote in message
t...

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/3563320.stm

In my book broadband has a minimum speed of 512K. Companies like NTL

that
flog slow 150K services and claim that is broadband are conning the
consumer.

While we're on the subject, would anyone say that 8 64k ISDN lines
bonded together then used solely for internet access constituted
broadband?

If they are B-ISDN lines yes since they are broadband anyway.
--
Mugwump

Reply to 'usenetmail{at}discworld{dot}org{dot}uk



  #4  
Old August 15th 04, 06:31 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Tim Clark
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Posts: 179
Default The definition of broadband ..... official !!

In article ,
Mugwump writes:


In article , Dan
said......

I read somewhere the true definition of broadband. "a line which can carry
many channels of infomation and is always connected" .

In my mind a broadband connection has to be always on and the speed not
restricting anything you do on the net.

I wouldn't class 512kbps as broadband. 1000kbps is the least I would
consider as broadband. In other countries I suppose this would be much
higher.



The 'true' definition doesn't mention connection criteria. The
definition is 'A type of data transmission in which a single medium
(wire) can carry several channels at once.'


That's the technical definition, and the original use of the word. To
claim it is in some way 'true' is perhaps a little strong. Its current
more popular usage can't be denied. That derives from sales and marketing
and is therefore inherently meaningless - it can be no more defined in
terms of speed than words like "superb", "fab" or "wonderful".

The ASA ruling essentially agreed that "broadband" (in popular usage,
which will be the only use it understands) couldn't be defined. The
ruling concentrated on the use of "full speed", essentially saying
something couldn't imply it was fastest when there were faster ones
around.

--
Tim Clark
  #5  
Old August 16th 04, 02:37 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
boo_star
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 11
Default The definition of broadband ..... official !!


"Tim Clark" wrote in message
news:[email protected]

That's the technical definition, and the original use of the word. To
claim it is in some way 'true' is perhaps a little strong. Its current
more popular usage can't be denied. That derives from sales and marketing
and is therefore inherently meaningless - it can be no more defined in
terms of speed than words like "superb", "fab" or "wonderful".


I have been taught, and I believe this is correct, that "broadband" refers
to the signal being sent over a "broad" band of frequencies.

As opposed to "baseband" (e.g. ethernet) which is sent over one frequency.

http://searchnetworking.techtarget.c...211706,00.html
has the correct definition...

"In general, broadband refers to telecommunication in which a wide band of
frequencies is available to transmit information. "

The ASA ruling essentially agreed that "broadband" (in popular usage,
which will be the only use it understands) couldn't be defined. The
ruling concentrated on the use of "full speed", essentially saying
something couldn't imply it was fastest when there were faster ones
around.


Yes, the current usage of the word "broadband" tends to refer to speed (i.e.
anything over dual ISDN speeds.) It is being used as a marketing term
though.


  #6  
Old August 16th 04, 08:00 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Graham Murray
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 207
Default The definition of broadband ..... official !!

"Tim Clark" writes:

That's the technical definition, and the original use of the word. To
claim it is in some way 'true' is perhaps a little strong. Its current
more popular usage can't be denied. That derives from sales and marketing
and is therefore inherently meaningless - it can be no more defined in
terms of speed than words like "superb", "fab" or "wonderful".

The ASA ruling essentially agreed that "broadband" (in popular usage,
which will be the only use it understands) couldn't be defined.


If they say that the "popular usage" cannot be defined, should they
not rule that the only permissible use (in advertising) is the
technical definition - which is clearly defined.
  #7  
Old August 16th 04, 09:33 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
The Social Outcast
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3
Default The definition of broadband ..... official !!


"Tim Clark" wrote in message
news:[email protected]

The ASA ruling essentially agreed that "broadband" (in popular usage,
which will be the only use it understands) couldn't be defined. The
ruling concentrated on the use of "full speed", essentially saying
something couldn't imply it was fastest when there were faster ones
around.


But then again it could be said that the ASA are a bunch of monkeys who are
only interested in feathering their own nests.

I reported BTOpenworld for advertising on their website that their service
was "always-on". The ASA responded by saying that *any* organisation can
claim whatever they like on their own website and it wouldn't intervene!

Astonishing.

A few weeks later, BTOpenworld again repeated their lie that their broadband
service was "always-on", this time in a national newspaper so I again
pursued this through the ASA.

Their response was that the "always-on" claim was considered a bog-standard
feature of any broadband advertising campaign and, again, it wouldn't be
taking action.

Now either the ASA are a bunch of ******s or BTOpenworld were bunging them
used tenners in a brown envelope.

It can only be one or the other...............you can all make your own
minds up.


  #8  
Old August 20th 04, 12:39 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
The Grass is greener
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 41
Default The definition of broadband ..... official !!

On Mon, 16 Aug 2004 19:33:03 GMT, [The Social Outcast] said :-


"Tim Clark" wrote in message
news:[email protected]

The ASA ruling essentially agreed that "broadband" (in popular usage,
which will be the only use it understands) couldn't be defined. The
ruling concentrated on the use of "full speed", essentially saying
something couldn't imply it was fastest when there were faster ones
around.


But then again it could be said that the ASA are a bunch of monkeys who are
only interested in feathering their own nests.

I reported BTOpenworld for advertising on their website that their service
was "always-on". The ASA responded by saying that *any* organisation can
claim whatever they like on their own website and it wouldn't intervene!

Astonishing.

A few weeks later, BTOpenworld again repeated their lie that their broadband
service was "always-on", this time in a national newspaper so I again
pursued this through the ASA.

Their response was that the "always-on" claim was considered a bog-standard
feature of any broadband advertising campaign and, again, it wouldn't be
taking action.

Now either the ASA are a bunch of ******s or BTOpenworld were bunging them
used tenners in a brown envelope.

It can only be one or the other...............you can all make your own
minds up.


Hey bucky, did you also report your supplier for their website
"always-on" comments ?

http://www.blueyonder.co.uk/

"Choose from our range of award winning 'always on' broadband services
starting at 17.99."

 




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