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uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

Cat 5 cable spec



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 18th 04, 03:53 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Frank Stacey
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default Cat 5 cable spec

I want to run a longish length of cable from (near) my router to (near) a PC
in a neighbouriung building. The total distance will be close to the 100m
limit. I believe there are various types or qualities of cable and I should
(perhaps) buy something other than the cheapest. In particular I read in a
recent article that there is solid core (?) cable which is a better quality
and is suitable for my cable run. I see that screwfix offers a foil
shielded (FTP) variant. Can anyone explain or point me to an explanation of
the different specs? What are the official standards approving boidies'
designations for the various specs?


--
Frank Stacey

  #2  
Old August 18th 04, 04:25 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Paul Landregan
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 58
Default Cat 5 cable spec


"Frank Stacey" wrote in message
...
I want to run a longish length of cable from (near) my router to (near) a
PC
in a neighbouriung building. The total distance will be close to the 100m
limit. I believe there are various types or qualities of cable and I
should
(perhaps) buy something other than the cheapest. In particular I read in
a
recent article that there is solid core (?) cable which is a better
quality
and is suitable for my cable run. I see that screwfix offers a foil
shielded (FTP) variant. Can anyone explain or point me to an explanation
of
the different specs? What are the official standards approving boidies'
designations for the various specs?


--
Frank Stacey

What you running over the cable? 10/100/1000MBit Ethernet? Also if its going
outside, it is preferred to offer some environment protection, Cat5 cable is
for indoor use. All fixed installation cable should be solid core, only
patch cords are stranded, for flexibility and resistance to breaking when
moved.

There are better cable Cat5e, Cat6, and now Cat7.


  #3  
Old August 18th 04, 04:50 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Linker3000
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 108
Default Cat 5 cable spec

Frank Stacey wrote:

I want to run a longish length of cable from (near) my router to (near) a PC
in a neighbouriung building. The total distance will be close to the 100m
limit. I believe there are various types or qualities of cable and I should
(perhaps) buy something other than the cheapest. In particular I read in a
recent article that there is solid core (?) cable which is a better quality
and is suitable for my cable run. I see that screwfix offers a foil
shielded (FTP) variant. Can anyone explain or point me to an explanation of
the different specs? What are the official standards approving boidies'
designations for the various specs?


--
Frank Stacey

Any cable that claims to be to cat 5/5e standard should be 'to standard'
(!).

Solid core cable is the stuff to run through buildings. Stranded core is
designed for patch (equipment/rack) leads.

Shielded cable may make it more likely that the long run will work, but
make sure you use the matching connectors etc. and see below.

Solid core cable should be terminated at both ends at a punch down
connector - a wall plate or a distribution panel - NOT by using a
crimped connector (ie: an RJ45 plug). If you use crimp connectors on
solid core cable the compression of the solid copper makes it brittle
and more susceptible to breakage or intermittent failures.

If you are wiring between buildings you may need to check that the
buildings share a common or close-common earth (ground) point otherwise
potential ('voltage') differences at their ground points can cause
strange effects which adversely affect ('screw up'!) data transmission.
The IEEE wiring regs cover this because, at worse case, the potential
difference between the two locations can be sufficient to damage
equipment and give someone an elecric shock - I once measured the
potential difference ('voltage') between two pieces of data cable strung
between two buildings and it was around 70-80V.

Have you considered wireless?

Cheers

L3K


  #4  
Old August 18th 04, 05:48 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
sean
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 42
Default Cat 5 cable spec

Linker3000 wrote:
Frank Stacey wrote:

I want to run a longish length of cable from (near) my router to
(near) a PC
in a neighbouriung building. The total distance will be close to the 100m
limit. I believe there are various types or qualities of cable and I
should
(perhaps) buy something other than the cheapest. In particular I read
in a
recent article that there is solid core (?) cable which is a better
quality
and is suitable for my cable run. I see that screwfix offers a foil
shielded (FTP) variant. Can anyone explain or point me to an
explanation of
the different specs? What are the official standards approving boidies'
designations for the various specs?


--
Frank Stacey

Any cable that claims to be to cat 5/5e standard should be 'to standard'
(!).

Solid core cable is the stuff to run through buildings. Stranded core is
designed for patch (equipment/rack) leads.

Shielded cable may make it more likely that the long run will work, but
make sure you use the matching connectors etc. and see below.

Solid core cable should be terminated at both ends at a punch down
connector - a wall plate or a distribution panel - NOT by using a
crimped connector (ie: an RJ45 plug). If you use crimp connectors on
solid core cable the compression of the solid copper makes it brittle
and more susceptible to breakage or intermittent failures.

If you are wiring between buildings you may need to check that the
buildings share a common or close-common earth (ground) point otherwise
potential ('voltage') differences at their ground points can cause
strange effects which adversely affect ('screw up'!) data transmission.
The IEEE wiring regs cover this because, at worse case, the potential
difference between the two locations can be sufficient to damage
equipment and give someone an elecric shock - I once measured the
potential difference ('voltage') between two pieces of data cable strung
between two buildings and it was around 70-80V.

Have you considered wireless?

Cheers

L3K



How far does wireless work?
  #5  
Old August 18th 04, 06:25 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Paul Landregan
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 58
Default Cat 5 cable spec


How far does wireless work?


Out of the box 50-300m. With an antenna upgrade, anything upto 50-60km with
clear LOS.


  #6  
Old August 18th 04, 06:44 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
martin
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 82
Default Cat 5 cable spec

sean wrote:



Have you considered wireless?

Cheers

L3K



How far does wireless work?


you can get it over several miles with the right kit and line of sight
(of course)
  #7  
Old August 18th 04, 07:03 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
sean
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 42
Default Cat 5 cable spec

Martin wrote:
sean wrote:



Have you considered wireless?

Cheers

L3K



How far does wireless work?



you can get it over several miles with the right kit and line of sight
(of course)


IF only my area was more flat¬

could share my ADSL with family!
  #8  
Old August 19th 04, 12:07 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
martin
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 82
Default Cat 5 cable spec

sean wrote:
Martin wrote:

sean wrote:



Have you considered wireless?

Cheers

L3K



How far does wireless work?




you can get it over several miles with the right kit and line of sight
(of course)



IF only my area was more flat¬

could share my ADSL with family!


move to Holland!

A mate of mine does just that kind of thing (with the agreement of the
ISP). He lives in the sticks, and uses his local pub as the ADSL
provider. He stuck an (I hate this word, never could spell it, even when
I was doing my comms modules at uni) ariel on the roof of the pub, and
beamed it into his house. Then distributes it to the other four houses
in his close.
  #9  
Old August 19th 04, 02:15 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Paul G
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 41
Default Cat 5 cable spec


"Paul Landregan" wrote in message
. ..
Cat5 cable is for indoor use.


You can get external grade (uv protected) Cat5 at:
http://www.homestead.co.uk/900146.htm I have used in on a run between 2
separate buildings on our site at work.

Paul



  #10  
Old August 19th 04, 02:16 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Paul G
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 41
Default Cat 5 cable spec


"Linker3000" wrote in message
...
If you are wiring between buildings you may need to check that the
buildings share a common or close-common earth (ground) point otherwise
potential ('voltage') differences at their ground points can cause strange
effects which adversely affect ('screw up'!) data transmission.


Ethernet is protected against different ground potentials by the use of
isolation transformers on the ethernet cards

Paul


 




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