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uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

I don't get it!



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 7th 04, 10:46 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Richard Sobey
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Posts: 234
Default I don't get it!

So, BT has upped the limit for either getting Broadband at all or
achieving a higher downstrem datarate than was previously possible.
What was the reasoning behind the limits in the first place? Were they
just trying to test with "real" limits or have they installed new kit
in the exchanges that can handle lossier/longer lines?

Richard
  #2  
Old September 7th 04, 11:36 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Beck
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Posts: 180
Default I don't get it!


"Richard Sobey" wrote in message
news
So, BT has upped the limit for either getting Broadband at all or
achieving a higher downstrem datarate than was previously possible.
What was the reasoning behind the limits in the first place? Were they
just trying to test with "real" limits or have they installed new kit
in the exchanges that can handle lossier/longer lines?


They have been doing trials in Milton Keynes and other places to allow adsl on
lines a greater limit. They have found the trials to be successful at most
lengths, so have remove the limit on 512 adsl.
This of course does not mean that everyone will still be able to get adsl, there
will be a few who cannot get it. But I think what happens now is that everyone
that is on an enabled exchange will be given 512 no matter what. If then the
line does not work after activation, an engineer will be sent round free of
charge to fix an adsl faceplate and tweak the line. They reckon most cases that
will work. if after the engineer visit, adsl is still not workable, then the
contract for adsl will be ceased with no penalty.
I don't think they have installed new equipment, they have just realised that
the current equipment can be used more effectively.


  #3  
Old September 7th 04, 01:00 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Peter Crosland
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Posts: 167
Default I don't get it!

Richard Sobey wrote:
So, BT has upped the limit for either getting Broadband at all or
achieving a higher downstrem datarate than was previously possible.
What was the reasoning behind the limits in the first place?

Any commercial organisation has to take a view on what it can deliver that
will work. It seems that BT were far too cautious when the originally set
the limits. The kit has not changed.


  #4  
Old September 7th 04, 04:37 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Chris Comley
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Posts: 41
Default I don't get it!

Richard Sobey wrote:

So, BT has upped the limit for either getting Broadband at all or
achieving a higher downstrem datarate than was previously possible.
What was the reasoning behind the limits in the first place? Were they
just trying to test with "real" limits or have they installed new kit
in the exchanges that can handle lossier/longer lines?


Reality.

What they've been doing is testing the limits of the technology whilst
getting fee-paying users on board who were 100% (or near to) certain
to work properly.

Each increase in the limit has been after a period of testing. There's
no new technology, really, just they're edging closer to the edge. Now
they've removed the formal limits all they're really doign is saying
"we'll try it, if it works, you can have it". There are *rare*
occurrances of this happening before, we've had customers told that
officially they were too far/too quiet for ADSL, but as it was in, and
working, they'd leave it. (Or, in one case, a client moved offices
from one room to another, had his phone line moved, and BT wouldn't
re-provide the ADSL service.)


---
Business ADSL solutions
www.wizards.co.uk
  #5  
Old September 7th 04, 05:23 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Richard Sobey
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Posts: 234
Default I don't get it!

On Tue, 07 Sep 2004 15:37:59 +0100, Chris Comley
wrote:

Reality.


Thanks for all the replies folks.

Richard.
 




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