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How to identify a line where broadband has been enabled on when there are multiple lines going into a PBX?



 
 
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  #1  
Old December 15th 04, 09:47 PM posted to uk.telecom,uk.telecom.broadband
Conor McKeown
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default How to identify a line where broadband has been enabled on when there are multiple lines going into a PBX?

Part deux, trois & cuatre...

I'm still having problems, but here's what I done so far and the problems I
have and what I'll do again when I have time in the next few days...

I identified the fax line and connected an old extension socket to this
direct from the Network Distribution box using 2 wires of an old piece of
wire that was lying about in their office (possible error number 1)
I then put the ADSL filter onto this line and internet worked fine
I then ran an extension with new cable to the part of the office that is
occupied and put a new ADSL filter on there and internet worked fine from
there also when I connected up the ADSL modem there Having said this, almost
at the end of the cable run (about 30m) the staple gun slipped and I went
straight through the middle of the cable. I don't think it did any harm as
the pair the extension (& ADSL) were connected on still worked. If it had
initially shown up as problem I would have used a different pair or snipped
the extension at that point and connected up the extension socket & ADSL
modem. Incidentally the extension from downstairs to upstairs is just
punched into the same 2 'receptacles' as the 2 wires from the Network
Distribution box, which I think are 2 and 5 but I'll double check that next
time I'm there.

I'm pretty certain that when I first connected a phone to the new socket I
had connected I was able to dial my mobile number without using the 9
prefix, but that seems to have changed now. Normally when calls go through
the PBX they appear as "Private Number" but this first time when I dialled
my mobile number it actually came up with the caller ID of the fax line so I
thought I was onto a winner.

Whether it was just beginner's luck or what I'm not sure, but what started
happening after a few days, or perhaps only became apparent after a few days
was that there was quite a lot of noise on the fax line, like a humming
noise and you can hear lots of beeps & clicking sounds also like the
internal workings of the PBX I reckon.

Also, remember that when 9 is pressed for an external line the PBX has been
pre-programmed to pick up the fax line first and when this happens the ADSL
connection drops and doesn't come back online again until that line has been
freed up.

When they told me about the problems I started troubleshooting and took the
ADSL modem downstairs again and connected to internet fine from there, but
as soon as the fax line is picked up by someone pressing 9 it causes the
ADSL connection to drop. The internet connection also drops when the fax
line is rung from outside and is picked up.

The only thing I didn't do that might be causing the problem is disconnect
the extension that runs from downstairs to upstairs in case I did puncture
one of the wires with the staple gun and that is causing the problems.

What I think also might be the problem is that I didn't use a Master Socket
for the initial socket downstairs that is connected straight into the
Network Distribution box - should I have used one there?

Should I have disconnected the wires coming into the Network Distribution
box and run them straight into a Master Socket and from there should I run
them back to the Network Distribution box?
a) I don't think that would really make any difference though would it?
b) If I do wire straight from incoming wires to a new Master Socket should I
then wire straight from there to the PBX and skip the Network Distribution
box?

I'll be replacing the initial short length of wire from Network Distribution
box to extension socket to make sure it's not a bad length of wire and/or
socket - should I definitely use a Master Socket?

As I had an extension socket wired straight from the Network Distribution
box shouldn't any calls made through this socket have been routed straight
out without having to go through the PBX or is this because I never used a
Master Socket in the first instance or is it something else? Or is it that
the Network Distribution box is connected to the PBX anyway and because it's
all connected phone calls goes through the PBX? How can the 'wire'
differentiate between phone & ADSL signals and not send the ADSL signal via
the PBX or is this where a Master Socket would come into play?

I didn't have a Master Socket when I first went there - I'm hoping that's
the only problem and that a fiver spent buying a Master Socket in the first
instance would have saved me all this time & grief... I'm a bit more
knowledgeable now I think, but then again if a Master Socket doesn't sort it
out and it's not the wiring I'm wells & truly clueless and will have to call
in 'an expert' from BT!

Any pointers would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

Conor.

--- Remove nospam to reply direct ---




"Lurch" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 29 Nov 2004 11:02:39 -0000, "Conor McKeown"
strung together this:

Their fax machine is plugged into a socket that is wired back into the

PBX
and when I put the ADSL modem on that socket (and all the others) it

doesn't
see the ADSL service presumably because it goes through the (digital?)

PBX?

Correct.

Do I simply need to connect up a line box straight to the Network
Distribution box and connect the ADSL modem through there? If so, do I

just
use the little punch tool?


Theoretically you would, but that's a job for BT, technically...

Also, where would I get those little see through
rubberised metal clamp like things that cap some of the wires in the

network
distribution panel?

Good question, what are they again?

If what I have proposed above does not work what would BT charge to come

out
and do this? My friend's company now pay & route all the call charges
through 'Your Communications' so would they call them who would then

engage
BT or do they have their own engineers?

No, call BT direct and they will book an engineer to not visit.

Not sure if this part is relevant but their phone system has been

configured
in such a way that when anyone in the office makes a call (dial 9 first)

it
will first of all pick up the fax line and then use one of the other 2

lines
if that one is busy etc. I also believe that if someone has dialled the

fax
number it will also ring on the office phones so that they could pick up

in
cases where someone rings the fax line hoping to get a person on the

other
end of the line.

Sounds like a lash up to me, did your mate pay for this?
--

SJW
A.C.S. Ltd
Please reply to group or use 'usenet' in email subject



  #2  
Old December 15th 04, 10:14 PM posted to uk.telecom,uk.telecom.broadband
lurch
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 498
Default How to identify a line where broadband has been enabled on when there are multiple lines going into a PBX?

On Wed, 15 Dec 2004 21:47:38 -0000, "Conor McKeown"
strung together this:

Any pointers would be greatly appreciated.

Get someone in who knows what they're doing.
--

SJW
Please reply to group or use 'usenet' in email subject
  #3  
Old December 15th 04, 10:58 PM posted to uk.telecom,uk.telecom.broadband
Andrew Sayers
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 65
Default How to identify a line where broadband has been enabled on when there are multiple lines going into a PBX?

Lurch wrote:

On Wed, 15 Dec 2004 21:47:38 -0000, "Conor McKeown"
strung together this:

Any pointers would be greatly appreciated.

Get someone in who knows what they're doing.


I totally agree - you could easily find things go from bad to worse if you are on
your own. This looks to me like a time to call in a local firm who can sort all this
out with a minimum of fuss.


--
The reply to email address is a valid address of a
proven spammer, quoted with the sole intention of
generating spam for them.
If you'd like to reply to me, then please
use the newsgroup.
  #4  
Old December 16th 04, 07:45 AM posted to uk.telecom,uk.telecom.broadband
kraftee
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,069
Default How to identify a line where broadband has been enabled on when there are multiple lines going into a PBX?

Conor McKeown wrote:
Part deux, trois & cuatre...

I'm still having problems, but here's what I done so far and the
problems I have and what I'll do again when I have time in the next
few days...

I identified the fax line and connected an old extension socket to
this direct from the Network Distribution box using 2 wires of an old
piece of wire that was lying about in their office (possible error
number 1)
I then put the ADSL filter onto this line and internet worked fine
I then ran an extension with new cable to the part of the office that
is occupied and put a new ADSL filter on there and internet worked
fine from there also when I connected up the ADSL modem there Having
said this, almost at the end of the cable run (about 30m) the staple
gun slipped and I went straight through the middle of the cable. I
don't think it did any harm as the pair the extension (& ADSL) were
connected on still worked. If it had initially shown up as problem I
would have used a different pair or snipped the extension at that
point and connected up the extension socket & ADSL modem.
Incidentally the extension from downstairs to upstairs is just
punched into the same 2 'receptacles' as the 2 wires from the Network
Distribution box, which I think are 2 and 5 but I'll double check
that next time I'm there.

I'm pretty certain that when I first connected a phone to the new
socket I had connected I was able to dial my mobile number without
using the 9 prefix, but that seems to have changed now. Normally when
calls go through the PBX they appear as "Private Number" but this
first time when I dialled my mobile number it actually came up with
the caller ID of the fax line so I thought I was onto a winner.

Whether it was just beginner's luck or what I'm not sure, but what
started happening after a few days, or perhaps only became apparent
after a few days was that there was quite a lot of noise on the fax
line, like a humming noise and you can hear lots of beeps & clicking
sounds also like the internal workings of the PBX I reckon.

Also, remember that when 9 is pressed for an external line the PBX
has been pre-programmed to pick up the fax line first and when this
happens the ADSL connection drops and doesn't come back online again
until that line has been freed up.

When they told me about the problems I started troubleshooting and
took the ADSL modem downstairs again and connected to internet fine
from there, but as soon as the fax line is picked up by someone
pressing 9 it causes the ADSL connection to drop. The internet
connection also drops when the fax line is rung from outside and is
picked up.

The only thing I didn't do that might be causing the problem is
disconnect the extension that runs from downstairs to upstairs in
case I did puncture one of the wires with the staple gun and that is
causing the problems.

What I think also might be the problem is that I didn't use a Master
Socket for the initial socket downstairs that is connected straight
into the Network Distribution box - should I have used one there?

Should I have disconnected the wires coming into the Network
Distribution box and run them straight into a Master Socket and from
there should I run them back to the Network Distribution box?
a) I don't think that would really make any difference though would
it?
b) If I do wire straight from incoming wires to a new Master Socket
should I then wire straight from there to the PBX and skip the
Network Distribution box?

I'll be replacing the initial short length of wire from Network
Distribution box to extension socket to make sure it's not a bad
length of wire and/or socket - should I definitely use a Master
Socket?

As I had an extension socket wired straight from the Network
Distribution box shouldn't any calls made through this socket have
been routed straight out without having to go through the PBX or is
this because I never used a Master Socket in the first instance or is
it something else? Or is it that the Network Distribution box is
connected to the PBX anyway and because it's all connected phone
calls goes through the PBX? How can the 'wire' differentiate between
phone & ADSL signals and not send the ADSL signal via the PBX or is
this where a Master Socket would come into play?

I didn't have a Master Socket when I first went there - I'm hoping
that's the only problem and that a fiver spent buying a Master Socket
in the first instance would have saved me all this time & grief...
I'm a bit more knowledgeable now I think, but then again if a Master
Socket doesn't sort it out and it's not the wiring I'm wells & truly
clueless and will have to call in 'an expert' from BT!


Why haven't you disconnected the line from the PBX????

If you can't do that get a filter in line between the NTTP, where you have
apparently teed on, & the PBX...

Next time leave it to someone whe actually knows what they are doing


  #5  
Old December 16th 04, 10:05 AM posted to uk.telecom,uk.telecom.broadband
Alex Monro
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 20
Default How to identify a line where broadband has been enabled on when there are multiple lines going into a PBX?

Conor McKeown wrote:

Part deux, trois & cuatre...

I'm still having problems, but here's what I done so far and the problems
I have and what I'll do again when I have time in the next few days...

snip long rambling activity log

I couldn't see any mention of fitting an ADSL mircrofilter in that lot.
If you are still wanting to use the ADSL line for voice or fax, you'll
definitely need at least one of those.

If you're not sure about what you're doing, and wiring ADSL into a DP
with a PBX on the line certainly comes under the heading of unusual and
tricky jobs, maybe you should follow the suggestion of other posters
and get someone who does know to have a look.
--
Alex Monro, Exeter, UK The good thing about being a pessimist
alexm at pobox dot com (No HTML) is that you have more chance of a
Running on GNU/Linux (SuSE 8.2) pleasant surprise.
GPG key 68F8 6270 available from hkp://blackhole.pca.dfn.de
  #6  
Old December 16th 04, 12:54 PM posted to uk.telecom,uk.telecom.broadband
Mike GW8IJT
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3
Default How to identify a line where broadband has been enabled on when there are multiple lines going into a PBX?

"Conor McKeown" wrote in message
...
Part deux, trois & cuatre...

I'm still having problems, but here's what I done so far and the

problems I
have and what I'll do again when I have time in the next few days...

I identified the fax line and connected an old extension socket to

this
direct from the Network Distribution box using 2 wires of an old piece

of
wire that was lying about in their office (possible error number 1)
I then put the ADSL filter onto this line and internet worked fine
I then ran an extension with new cable to the part of the office that

is
occupied and put a new ADSL filter on there and internet worked fine

from
there also when I connected up the ADSL modem there Having said this,

almost
at the end of the cable run (about 30m) the staple gun slipped and I

went
straight through the middle of the cable.


Remove the damaged cable & replace it, you've obviously messed it up.
Regards Mike.

--
The best thing about Christmas is when it's over.



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