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Is it safe to put 127.0.0.1 into ZA's trusted zone?



 
 
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  #1  
Old March 6th 05, 05:40 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband,comp.security.misc,alt.computer.security,comp.security.firewalls
Michael J. Pelletier
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Posts: 5
Default Is it safe to put 127.0.0.1 into ZA's trusted zone?

Sandi wrote:

On 01 Mar 2005, Spartanicus wrote:

Sandi wrote:

As I understand it 127.0.0.1 is actually the loopback address to
my own PC. So I figure it should be safe to include 127.0.0.1
as a Trusted Zone in Zone Alarm. Is it ok to do this?


Usually yes, the default config of most firewalls contains a
rule allowing it, strange that you got a prompt.


It seems weird to me but I am not a comms person.


Why would you want to put the loopback into your trusted zones file? That
only makes sense if you are running a Web server on your machine. In other
words that machine you have the loopback entry also has a web
server...other than that it is a meanings statement.

Michael
  #2  
Old March 7th 05, 11:47 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Alex Heney
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Posts: 1,607
Default Is it safe to put 127.0.0.1 into ZA's trusted zone?

On Mon, 07 Mar 2005 22:02:31 GMT, Sandi wrote:

On Sun 06 Mar 2005 05:40:39, Michael J. Pelletier wrote:
news:[email protected]

Sandi wrote:

On 01 Mar 2005, Spartanicus wrote:

Sandi wrote:

As I understand it 127.0.0.1 is actually the loopback address
to my own PC. So I figure it should be safe to include
127.0.0.1 as a Trusted Zone in Zone Alarm. Is it ok to do
this?

Usually yes, the default config of most firewalls contains a
rule allowing it, strange that you got a prompt.

It seems weird to me but I am not a comms person.


Why would you want to put the loopback into your trusted zones
file? That only makes sense if you are running a Web server on
your machine. In other words that machine you have the loopback
entry also has a web server...other than that it is a meanings
statement.


I don't really know why I would want to include 127.0.0.1 in my Zone
Alarm Pro firewall but from time to time the firewall blocks
something which needs access to that IP address. I have no idea why
that would be.


I run Oracle databases on my PC, and those effectively run a server on
127.0.0.1.

I do have it in my ZA trusted zone.
--
Alex Heney, Global Villager
Look out for #1. Don't step in #2 either.

To reply by email, my address is alexATheneyDOTplusDOTcom
  #3  
Old March 8th 05, 01:48 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Colin Wilson
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Posts: 850
Default Is it safe to put 127.0.0.1 into ZA's trusted zone?

If you are not prepared to trust 127.0.0.1 then why are you bothering
to run 'so-called' firewall software on it? What's the f'ing point
in placing trust in a piece of software when you don't trust the
machine it's running on ?


Maybe they were unaware it pointed to their own machine.

To the OP: I don`t know why (and it probably isn`t this !) but it might
be something simple like your hosts file is directing known malicious
sites to your own machine for their adverts (rather than downloading the
"real" malicious ones) - they`ll just appear blank that way in your
browser because they`re not found on your machine.

Something like Spybot Search & Destroy has a hosts file available, and
what it does is tell the computer where to look for certain sites, so if
you wanted to "block" access to installactivex.exploit.com you`d have

installactivex.exploit.com 127.0.0.1

in your hosts file - the hosts file is a plain text file with no file
extension (ie. "hosts" not "hosts.txt") in the Windows directory.

That`s my feeble attempt at a non-techie explanation - no doubt someone
will be along soon to tell me why its inaccurate :-}

--
Please add "[newsgroup]" in the subject of any personal replies via email
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  #4  
Old March 8th 05, 11:05 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Mark McIntyre
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Posts: 1,835
Default Is it safe to put 127.0.0.1 into ZA's trusted zone?

On Mon, 07 Mar 2005 22:02:31 GMT, Sandi wrote:


I don't really know why I would want to include 127.0.0.1 in my Zone
Alarm Pro firewall but from time to time the firewall blocks
something which needs access to that IP address. I have no idea why
that would be.


You're running some sort of local proxy (virus scanner for email?
these often proxy the mail ports) or you have software installed that
looks at the local IP for a security key.
  #5  
Old March 8th 05, 05:12 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
denlin
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Is it safe to put 127.0.0.1 into ZA's trusted zone?

The IP 127.0.0.1 is an address to the computer's loopback adapter on
your computer. The 127.x.x.x range is reserved for system loopback
tests, for example 127.0.0.1

As mentioned by Mark, antivirus and an array of other softwares uses the
127 range for various self tests etc. so it shouldn't be a problem.
HOWEVER, there have been cases where viruses are spoofing the 127
address (although your antivirus software would normally detect this).
Your best bet is to investigate WHAT it is that is trying to access the
address (windows does this systematically) and if still uncertain, block
to see if something essential stops working. Remember that you can
always unblock.

Here is an example of what the 127.x.x.x address range can be used for
as it can be used to your advantage if you want to block certain web
sites, e.g. sending pop-ups and ads etc by adding;
"127.0.1.1 ad.doubleclick.net" to the Hosts file as you will then have
told your computer to transfer all traffic to that website to the 127
address and thus blocked this traffic - you have effectively created a
loopback.

Mark McIntyre wrote:
On Mon, 07 Mar 2005 22:02:31 GMT, Sandi wrote:


I don't really know why I would want to include 127.0.0.1 in my Zone
Alarm Pro firewall but from time to time the firewall blocks
something which needs access to that IP address. I have no idea why
that would be.



You're running some sort of local proxy (virus scanner for email?
these often proxy the mail ports) or you have software installed that
looks at the local IP for a security key.


 




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