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uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

Using adsl connection for personal and customer use



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 30th 05, 12:38 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
icarus
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9
Default Using adsl connection for personal and customer use

Hi,

I have an idea to use adsl for my own use but also have a USB connection
available for members of the public to use for a fee in the next room. How
would I go about setting this up ? I assume that I would need some sort of
network and firewall but I have no idea how to do it. How long could the
connection be from the modem/router/whatever.

If I have my connection always on could someone with a laptop access the
internet service just with a USB cable to a USB socket on the wall ? Would
this be a potential security risk to my own system ? As I would be selling
on part of my line connection would I need a different type of contract with
my ISP and would I need to be a licensed provider ?

The idea is not to make a huge profit from it but just to provide a service
for customers when they pop in for a coffee and a cake that they could also
pick up their emails too I thought USB as not everyone has wireless.

any help much appreciated, any links to url that would give info would help
too )))
--
cheers,

Ice


  #2  
Old May 30th 05, 12:53 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
icarus
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9
Default Using adsl connection for personal and customer use


"Nigel Molesworth" wrote in message
...
In uk.telecom.broadband, icarus wrote:

I have an idea to use adsl for my own use but also have a USB connection
available for members of the public to use for a fee in the next room.


Not practical to use USB, they would have to load drivers etc. Either
provide ethernet, or wireless, from a router.


hmmm, I thought XP had all the drivers.


  #3  
Old May 30th 05, 01:42 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
cw
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 323
Default Using adsl connection for personal and customer use

"icarus" wrote in news:[email protected]
gui.ntli.net:

hmmm, I thought XP had all the drivers.


It might do, but the bundled drivers aren't always the best and you could
be setting yourself up for extra hassle when people find it doesn't work.
There are also a large number of people still using 2K or even 98.

--
Colin
*Drop DEAD from the email address to reply*
  #4  
Old May 30th 05, 01:54 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Martin Underwood
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 251
Default Using adsl connection for personal and customer use

"icarus" wrote in message
...
Hi,

I have an idea to use adsl for my own use but also have a USB connection
available for members of the public to use for a fee in the next room.
How would I go about setting this up ? I assume that I would need some
sort of network and firewall but I have no idea how to do it. How long
could the connection be from the modem/router/whatever.

If I have my connection always on could someone with a laptop access the
internet service just with a USB cable to a USB socket on the wall ? Would
this be a potential security risk to my own system ? As I would be selling
on part of my line connection would I need a different type of contract
with my ISP and would I need to be a licensed provider ?

The idea is not to make a huge profit from it but just to provide a
service for customers when they pop in for a coffee and a cake that they
could also pick up their emails too I thought USB as not everyone has
wireless.

any help much appreciated, any links to url that would give info would
help too )))


Best to use a wireless ADSL router, with connections for yourself and also
one or more wired connections for your customers. Also provide wireless for
those whose laptops have it.

You want to keep customers' PCs isolated from your own, so it might be
better to configure things slightly differently:

- give your PCs static IP addresses in the range 192.168.0.2 - 10, with
Norton Internet Security on each PC set to regard this range as "friendly";
if you use the wireless part of the router, set it to WPA security with SSID
hidden
- configure the router's DHCP to hand out addresses 192.168.0.11 - 20:
outside the range that your PCs regard as friendly, to make sure customers'
PCs cannot access your PCs
- for customers, connect an access point which uses a different SSID and
channel to your own, with whatever security you want

Customers will only see the wireless signal that's intended for them:
keeping the SSID of your wireless signal hidden is more to prevent it
confusing customers than for security reasons.

If you'll only be connecting your own PCs by wireless (and not by wire) you
can simplify things considerably by turning on wireless isolation (assuming
your router supports it) to stop wireless-to-wireless access, but this will
be at the expense of preventing your PCs talking to each other - this may
render this solution unworkable for you!


  #5  
Old May 30th 05, 02:37 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Peter M
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,496
Default Using adsl connection for personal and customer use

On 30 May 2005 13:53, "Dave" wrote:

How about those running Linux or with a Mac laptop? Almost everything
portable has ethernet now so you'd do better to look at that approach.


Yes, it would seem a better option to me too. With wireless, someone who
has had access might 'try it on' when parked outside the next week/month,
but with a physical cable to plug in, they don't have a chance :-) Peter.

[ For original poster - you might want to ask the sales people at your ISP
and a few others regarding allowing someone to use your connection for cash
but a problem I could see would be of them 'abusing' some person/service on
your IP/ISP and 2 weeks later you will have nothing in terms of details for
some random nutter who sent a death threat to the PM / President / Queen,
or someone who made contact with a terrorist group...
Who's to say it was not YOU that did it ? ]
--
Plus.Net http://tinyurl.com/5jpa4
I recommend them and save some cash.
  #6  
Old May 30th 05, 04:10 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
icarus
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9
Default Using adsl connection for personal and customer use


"Peter M" wrote in message
s.net...
On 30 May 2005 13:53, "Dave" wrote:

How about those running Linux or with a Mac laptop? Almost everything
portable has ethernet now so you'd do better to look at that approach.


Yes, it would seem a better option to me too. With wireless, someone who
has had access might 'try it on' when parked outside the next week/month,
but with a physical cable to plug in, they don't have a chance :-) Peter.


I wanted to go the cable way as otherwise the folk next door or wherever
could use it too. It looks like ethernet would be more flexible tho than
usb.

[ For original poster - you might want to ask the sales people at your ISP
and a few others regarding allowing someone to use your connection for
cash
but a problem I could see would be of them 'abusing' some person/service
on
your IP/ISP and 2 weeks later you will have nothing in terms of details
for
some random nutter who sent a death threat to the PM / President / Queen,
or someone who made contact with a terrorist group...
Who's to say it was not YOU that did it ? ]



well I figured they would have to use their own email account details to
send/receive emails over the internet connection. it wouldn't be my own pop
access as they wouldn't have my details. they would be accessing their own
email provider via their internet explorer/mozilla etc. The isp I would use
would not have email accounts as standard on the broadband account.




  #7  
Old May 30th 05, 04:16 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
icarus
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9
Default Using adsl connection for personal and customer use


"Martin Underwood" wrote in message
...
"icarus" wrote in message
...
Hi,

I have an idea to use adsl for my own use but also have a USB connection
available for members of the public to use for a fee in the next room.
How would I go about setting this up ? I assume that I would need some
sort of network and firewall but I have no idea how to do it. How long
could the connection be from the modem/router/whatever.

If I have my connection always on could someone with a laptop access the
internet service just with a USB cable to a USB socket on the wall ?
Would this be a potential security risk to my own system ? As I would be
selling on part of my line connection would I need a different type of
contract with my ISP and would I need to be a licensed provider ?

The idea is not to make a huge profit from it but just to provide a
service for customers when they pop in for a coffee and a cake that they
could also pick up their emails too I thought USB as not everyone has
wireless.

any help much appreciated, any links to url that would give info would
help too )))


Best to use a wireless ADSL router, with connections for yourself and also
one or more wired connections for your customers. Also provide wireless
for those whose laptops have it.

You want to keep customers' PCs isolated from your own, so it might be
better to configure things slightly differently:

- give your PCs static IP addresses in the range 192.168.0.2 - 10, with
Norton Internet Security on each PC set to regard this range as
"friendly"; if you use the wireless part of the router, set it to WPA
security with SSID hidden
- configure the router's DHCP to hand out addresses 192.168.0.11 - 20:
outside the range that your PCs regard as friendly, to make sure
customers' PCs cannot access your PCs
- for customers, connect an access point which uses a different SSID and
channel to your own, with whatever security you want

Customers will only see the wireless signal that's intended for them:
keeping the SSID of your wireless signal hidden is more to prevent it
confusing customers than for security reasons.

If you'll only be connecting your own PCs by wireless (and not by wire)
you can simplify things considerably by turning on wireless isolation
(assuming your router supports it) to stop wireless-to-wireless access,
but this will be at the expense of preventing your PCs talking to each
other - this may render this solution unworkable for you!



thanks for the detailed response

I would only have one/two pcs which would access wirelessly but not likely
to be at the same time.

it looks like Ethernet access for customers is most sensible as otherwise
they can be crafty and access from outside.

what sort of hardware would I need to do this and how far away can an
Ethernet port (if that's what its called) be from the main router/whatever ?
Would the router login to the ADSL phoneline and handle multiple machines
accessing the broadband line concurrently ? If so my pc(s) would need to be
on when there is customer access being made necessarily.

sorry for so many stupid question but I'm not at all knowledgeable in this
area obviously

tia


  #8  
Old May 30th 05, 04:44 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Andrew Gabriel
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 227
Default Using adsl connection for personal and customer use

In article ,
"icarus" writes:

well I figured they would have to use their own email account details to
send/receive emails over the internet connection. it wouldn't be my own pop
access as they wouldn't have my details. they would be accessing their own
email provider via their internet explorer/mozilla etc. The isp I would use
would not have email accounts as standard on the broadband account.


Sorry, can't help much as I don't have experience of setting
up public access internet, but I'll just point out that you
can use an adsl or dial-up to send out spam email without
having an email account anywhere. (It may be that public
access providers block TCP port 25 to prevent this.)

--
Andrew Gabriel

  #9  
Old May 30th 05, 05:03 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Carl
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 40
Default Using adsl connection for personal and customer use



"Nigel Molesworth" wrote in message
...

I'd still go for a wireless modem/router, for the reason that most newer
models are wireless. You can turn of the wireless bit, but it gives you
the option.


Why? Almost all laptops (modern and slightly older) contain an ethernet
card. I would say that many, many more people have ethernet ports than
wireless network cards.

Further, a hardwired network is less likely to pickup some moron trying to
steal bandwidth or abuse your account.


This is all you need, the sockets can be hundreds of metres away, so no
problem there.


Surely you mean upto a maximum of 100m for cat5?

Carl


  #10  
Old May 30th 05, 05:10 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Martin Underwood
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 251
Default Using adsl connection for personal and customer use

"icarus" wrote in message
...

"Martin Underwood" wrote in message
...
"icarus" wrote in message
...
Hi,


thanks for the detailed response


You're most welcome. That's what Bank Holidays are for, when you're
languishing in bed with flu :-(

I would only have one/two pcs which would access wirelessly but not likely
to be at the same time.

it looks like Ethernet access for customers is most sensible as otherwise
they can be crafty and access from outside.

what sort of hardware would I need to do this and how far away can an
Ethernet port (if that's what its called) be from the main router/whatever
? Would the router login to the ADSL phoneline and handle multiple
machines accessing the broadband line concurrently ? If so my pc(s) would
need to be on when there is customer access being made necessarily.

sorry for so many stupid question but I'm not at all knowledgeable in this
area obviously


You'd need a wireless router such as a Netgear DG834G or a Linksys WAG54G. I
can recommend a DG834GT (the T suffix indicates 108 rather than normal 54
Mbps of Wireless-G): in the six weeks that I've had it, it's never lost the
connection to the internet and the wireless link has never gone down[*].
I've only restarted it twice, and both times were simply because I was
taking it to customers to do a wireless coverage test before committign the
customers to buying one of their own.

I think the maximum length of an Ethernet spur is 200 metres - that figure
sticks in my mind as something to do with Ethernet, anyway! To save you
running several long lengths of Ethernet cable, you might buy a very cheap
hub and connect it at the remote end for your various customers to plug
into. Make sure that you buy Cat 5 (Category 5) network cable and don't run
it near any mains leads or other sources of interference.

You'd configure the router to log into your ISP using your ADSL username and
password. This would provide a standard TCP/IP connection to all the PCs
that were connected to it, either by Ethernet or wireless. Customers could
then access their email either by POP/SMTP (eg using Outlook Express or
Outlook), or using webmail. And they'd be able to browse the web and use
other programs that use IP, such as anti-virus update, DigiGuide update etc.
All the PCs would be able to access the interent at the same time without
any being aware of the others - apart from a slight slowing down when one of
the PCs is doing a download of a large file.

You'd need to leave your router (and hub, if fitted) turned on, but you
wouldn't need to leave any of your PCs on. (There is an alternative
configuration which would use one of your PCs as a gateway to the internet,
via an ADSL modem that plugged into a USB port - but that's technically
inferior, unnecessarily complicated and would require that PC to be left
on.)



[*] My experience of wireless, using the WG111T USB adaptor that came with
my router, is that the PC that it's plugged into may occasionally need to be
rebooted or else the adaptor may need to be unplugged from its USB and then
plugged back in - occasionally it locks up. But the router itself doesn't
need to be restarted.


 




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