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uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

New to ADSL broadband, what does 'bitstream' mean?



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 28th 05, 08:31 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Horse.trader
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9
Default New to ADSL broadband, what does 'bitstream' mean?

Having fairly recently joined NTL (512k) broadband, I was told by a BT
engineer that came to remove some RFI filters from my BT line, that, my
(broadband) 'connection' in the exchange was 'bitstream' he seems to
indicate this was good?

My actual connection speed is 2.2mps, but apparently BT cap this to 512k,
which is what I pay for, it certainly seems to be lightening fast, mind you,
compared to 33k dial up, I suppose it would!

Has anyone come across this 'bitsteam' term? The BT engineer said 'it's
bitstream and goes straight out??

No sure what he meant?


Brian Barwick (Huddersfield)


  #2  
Old June 28th 05, 09:06 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
kraftee
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,069
Default New to ADSL broadband, what does 'bitstream' mean?

Horse.trader wrote:
Having fairly recently joined NTL (512k) broadband, I was told by a BT
engineer that came to remove some RFI filters from my BT line, that,
my (broadband) 'connection' in the exchange was 'bitstream' he seems
to indicate this was good?

My actual connection speed is 2.2mps, but apparently BT cap this to
512k, which is what I pay for, it certainly seems to be lightening
fast, mind you, compared to 33k dial up, I suppose it would!

Has anyone come across this 'bitsteam' term? The BT engineer said
'it's bitstream and goes straight out??

No sure what he meant?


Don't think he did either.


  #3  
Old June 28th 05, 09:36 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
filthy
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default New to ADSL broadband, what does 'bitstream' mean?


"Horse.trader" wrote in message
news
Having fairly recently joined NTL (512k) broadband, I was told by a BT
engineer that came to remove some RFI filters from my BT line, that, my
(broadband) 'connection' in the exchange was 'bitstream' he seems to
indicate this was good?

My actual connection speed is 2.2mps, but apparently BT cap this to 512k,
which is what I pay for, it certainly seems to be lightening fast, mind
you, compared to 33k dial up, I suppose it would!

Has anyone come across this 'bitsteam' term? The BT engineer said 'it's
bitstream and goes straight out??

No sure what he meant?


Brian Barwick (Huddersfield)

bitstream is a term that applies to "packet writing"
"bit" is an abbreviation: binary digit.
Stream to denote as a packet
So to simply explain, when you see the terms 8bit, 32bit
or more commonly 24bit in DVD encoding, or the bit code
for your broadband connection.
Bitstreams are used extensively in telecommunications and computing.
example, the SDH communications technology transports synchronous
bitstreams,
and the TCP communications protocol transports a bytestream without
synchronous timing.
Note the diff spelling of bytestream, this denotes a special "packet" of
8bit, (8 binary digits
streamed as a "packet") so 3 bytestream is actually 24 bitstream as 3xpacket
stream -
but the timing is only synchronous within each packet.
If to be sychronus total, it will be a 24bitstream.
Now put the kettle on and have a cuppa tea.






  #4  
Old June 28th 05, 09:41 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Phil Thompson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,720
Default New to ADSL broadband, what does 'bitstream' mean?

On Tue, 28 Jun 2005 19:31:32 GMT, "Horse.trader"
wrote:

No sure what he meant?


he meant Datastream if you are NTHell


Phil
--
Tiscali - dialup speeds at Broadband prices, see
http://bbs.adslguide.org.uk/postlist...&Board=tiscali

AOL - the unlimited ISP of choice for heavy downloaders.
  #5  
Old June 28th 05, 09:51 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Lenny Nero
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 28
Default New to ADSL broadband, what does 'bitstream' mean?

Horse.trader said:

Having fairly recently joined NTL (512k) broadband, I was told by a BT
engineer that came to remove some RFI filters from my BT line, that, my
(broadband) 'connection' in the exchange was 'bitstream' he seems to
indicate this was good?

My actual connection speed is 2.2mps, but apparently BT cap this to 512k,
which is what I pay for, it certainly seems to be lightening fast, mind you,
compared to 33k dial up, I suppose it would!

Has anyone come across this 'bitsteam' term? The BT engineer said 'it's
bitstream and goes straight out??

No sure what he meant?


Brian Barwick (Huddersfield)


I thought you could have IP or DATA -stream in the UK.

The VP speed of 2.2 makes me think you have a data stream connection.

L.

--
Want to help to keep the best free usenet servers running ?
http://www.readfreenews.com

  #6  
Old June 28th 05, 10:05 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
David Taylor
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 49
Default New to ADSL broadband, what does 'bitstream' mean?

filthy wrote on Tue, 28 Jun 2005 20:36:23 +0000 (UTC):

"Horse.trader" wrote in message
news
Having fairly recently joined NTL (512k) broadband, I was told by a BT
engineer that came to remove some RFI filters from my BT line, that, my
(broadband) 'connection' in the exchange was 'bitstream' he seems to
indicate this was good?

My actual connection speed is 2.2mps, but apparently BT cap this to 512k,
which is what I pay for, it certainly seems to be lightening fast, mind
you, compared to 33k dial up, I suppose it would!

Has anyone come across this 'bitsteam' term? The BT engineer said 'it's
bitstream and goes straight out??

No sure what he meant?


Brian Barwick (Huddersfield)

bitstream is a term that applies to "packet writing"
"bit" is an abbreviation: binary digit.
Stream to denote as a packet
So to simply explain, when you see the terms 8bit, 32bit
or more commonly 24bit in DVD encoding, or the bit code
for your broadband connection.
Bitstreams are used extensively in telecommunications and computing.
example, the SDH communications technology transports synchronous
bitstreams,
and the TCP communications protocol transports a bytestream without
synchronous timing.
Note the diff spelling of bytestream, this denotes a special "packet" of
8bit, (8 binary digits
streamed as a "packet") so 3 bytestream is actually 24 bitstream as 3xpacket
stream -
but the timing is only synchronous within each packet.
If to be sychronus total, it will be a 24bitstream.
Now put the kettle on and have a cuppa tea.


You may (or may not, I'm not entirely convinced, but I can't figure
out why) be right. However, I think the engineer in question was
just confused about IPstream vs datastream.

--
David Taylor
  #7  
Old June 28th 05, 10:53 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
kraftee
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,069
Default New to ADSL broadband, what does 'bitstream' mean?

David Taylor wrote:
filthy wrote on Tue, 28 Jun 2005 20:36:23
+0000 (UTC):

"Horse.trader" wrote in message
news
Having fairly recently joined NTL (512k) broadband, I was told by a
BT engineer that came to remove some RFI filters from my BT line,
that, my (broadband) 'connection' in the exchange was 'bitstream'
he seems to indicate this was good?

My actual connection speed is 2.2mps, but apparently BT cap this to
512k, which is what I pay for, it certainly seems to be lightening
fast, mind you, compared to 33k dial up, I suppose it would!

Has anyone come across this 'bitsteam' term? The BT engineer said
'it's bitstream and goes straight out??

No sure what he meant?


Brian Barwick (Huddersfield)

bitstream is a term that applies to "packet writing"
"bit" is an abbreviation: binary digit.
Stream to denote as a packet
So to simply explain, when you see the terms 8bit, 32bit
or more commonly 24bit in DVD encoding, or the bit code
for your broadband connection.
Bitstreams are used extensively in telecommunications and computing.
example, the SDH communications technology transports synchronous
bitstreams,
and the TCP communications protocol transports a bytestream without
synchronous timing.
Note the diff spelling of bytestream, this denotes a special
"packet" of 8bit, (8 binary digits
streamed as a "packet") so 3 bytestream is actually 24 bitstream as
3xpacket stream -
but the timing is only synchronous within each packet.
If to be sychronus total, it will be a 24bitstream.
Now put the kettle on and have a cuppa tea.


You may (or may not, I'm not entirely convinced, but I can't figure
out why) be right. However, I think the engineer in question was
just confused about IPstream vs datastream.


Now that is far more likely...


  #8  
Old June 29th 05, 07:08 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Horse.trader
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9
Default New to ADSL broadband, what does 'bitstream' mean?

"kraftee" [email protected]&die wrote in message
...
David Taylor wrote:
filthy wrote on Tue, 28 Jun 2005 20:36:23
+0000 (UTC):

"Horse.trader" wrote in message
news Having fairly recently joined NTL (512k) broadband, I was told by a
BT engineer that came to remove some RFI filters from my BT line,
that, my (broadband) 'connection' in the exchange was 'bitstream'
he seems to indicate this was good?

My actual connection speed is 2.2mps, but apparently BT cap this to
512k, which is what I pay for, it certainly seems to be lightening
fast, mind you, compared to 33k dial up, I suppose it would!

Has anyone come across this 'bitsteam' term? The BT engineer said
'it's bitstream and goes straight out??

No sure what he meant?


Brian Barwick (Huddersfield)

bitstream is a term that applies to "packet writing"
"bit" is an abbreviation: binary digit.
Stream to denote as a packet
So to simply explain, when you see the terms 8bit, 32bit
or more commonly 24bit in DVD encoding, or the bit code
for your broadband connection.
Bitstreams are used extensively in telecommunications and computing.
example, the SDH communications technology transports synchronous
bitstreams,
and the TCP communications protocol transports a bytestream without
synchronous timing.
Note the diff spelling of bytestream, this denotes a special
"packet" of 8bit, (8 binary digits
streamed as a "packet") so 3 bytestream is actually 24 bitstream as
3xpacket stream -
but the timing is only synchronous within each packet.
If to be sychronus total, it will be a 24bitstream.
Now put the kettle on and have a cuppa tea.


You may (or may not, I'm not entirely convinced, but I can't figure
out why) be right. However, I think the engineer in question was
just confused about IPstream vs datastream.


Now that is far more likely...
.................................................. ...................................
Thank you gentelmen for the replies.


I understand a little more now, it is probably datastream I have.

Thanks again


Brian (Huddersfield)


 




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