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Zen static IP



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 9th 05, 11:25 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
can2002
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7
Default Zen static IP

I'm currently using AAISP but am considering switching to Zen. The one
thing I'm not completely sure about is how Zen allocate static IP addresses.

At AAISP I get a block of static IP addresses in addition to a unique PPP
assigned IP address.

Zen tell me that with the 8 static IP option my ADSL router uses one of the
addresses, which is automatically allocated via PPP (the highest address in
the block), which would mean both my internal and external addresses would
be the same.

Can anyone shed any light on this for me??

Cheers,
Chris


  #2  
Old July 9th 05, 12:39 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
S. V. Shah
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default Zen static IP

On Sat, 9 Jul 2005 11:25:15 +0100, "can2002"
[email protected] wrote:

I'm currently using AAISP but am considering switching to Zen. The one
thing I'm not completely sure about is how Zen allocate static IP addresses.

At AAISP I get a block of static IP addresses in addition to a unique PPP
assigned IP address.

Zen tell me that with the 8 static IP option my ADSL router uses one of the
addresses, which is automatically allocated via PPP (the highest address in
the block), which would mean both my internal and external addresses would
be the same.

Can anyone shed any light on this for me??

Cheers,
Chris


It is pretty much how you describe your AAISP setup.

So out of the 8 IP addresses, 3 are used as follows:

1 assigned to the router, as a gateway
1 to represent the network
1 to represent a broadcast address

What I did was to manually assign the highest address to the router
(to act as a gateway) as indicated by Zen. When I look in my router's
online status page it shows a 62.x.x.x address (not sure if this is
unique) allocated as a WAN address which links my router to a remote
system.

I also use a mix of some real and some private IP addresses (mapped
within the router to real IP's) so the router's internal IP is
192.168.x.x and external IP is the allocated gateway IP.

HTH
  #3  
Old July 9th 05, 10:37 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Andrew Hodgson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 161
Default Zen static IP

On Sat, 9 Jul 2005 11:25:15 +0100, "can2002"
[email protected] wrote:

I'm currently using AAISP but am considering switching to Zen. The one
thing I'm not completely sure about is how Zen allocate static IP addresses.

At AAISP I get a block of static IP addresses in addition to a unique PPP
assigned IP address.

Zen tell me that with the 8 static IP option my ADSL router uses one of the
addresses, which is automatically allocated via PPP (the highest address in
the block), which would mean both my internal and external addresses would
be the same.


Yes.

Can anyone shed any light on this for me??


You have 8 addresses:
1: Network
2: Machine
3: Machine
4: Machine
5: Machine
6: Machine
7: Router
8: Broadcast

The router's external (WAN) address is assigned by Zen and is static
or dynamic (I don't know which but with AAISP its static).

On the same tack, I use AAISP because I didn't get charged for extra
IP addresses, and in addition to the block of 16 I have, I also have a
different subnet, which means I can run a cheap router and a good
firewall, the WAN IP for the firewall being the second address in the
extra block of two addresses I have. Enabling this was just a matter
of ticking a box with AAISP.

Thanks.
Andrew.
--
Andrew Hodgson in Bromyard, Herefordshire, UK.
My Email: use andrew at hodgsonfamily dot org.
  #4  
Old July 11th 05, 09:10 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
MA
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 63
Default Zen static IP


"can2002" [email protected] wrote in message
.. .
I'm currently using AAISP but am considering switching to Zen. The one
thing I'm not completely sure about is how Zen allocate static IP

addresses.

At AAISP I get a block of static IP addresses in addition to a unique PPP
assigned IP address.

Zen tell me that with the 8 static IP option my ADSL router uses one of

the
addresses, which is automatically allocated via PPP (the highest address

in
the block), which would mean both my internal and external addresses would
be the same.


It uses "ip unnumbered" - or whatever your routers manufacturer calls it.

From Cisco.com: "The ip unnumbered configuration command allows you to
enable IP processing on a serial interface without assigning it an explicit
IP address. The ip unnumbered interface can "borrow" the IP address of
another interface already configured on the router, which conserves network
and address space. "

So it's a way of not having to configure another address on the PPP link,
saving a block of 4 IPs (/30). As you have to configure a gateway address
anyway, makes sense to do this.


  #5  
Old July 11th 05, 08:19 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
can2002
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7
Default Zen static IP


"Andrew Hodgson" wrote in message
news
On Sat, 9 Jul 2005 11:25:15 +0100, "can2002"
The router's external (WAN) address is assigned by Zen and is static
or dynamic (I don't know which but with AAISP its static).


That makes sense, as per AAISP. The difference seems to be that the IP
address AAISP assign my PPP interface is in a totally different subnet from
my static ranges used on the Ethernet side of the ADSL router.

On the same tack, I use AAISP because I didn't get charged for extra
IP addresses, and in addition to the block of 16 I have, I also have a
different subnet, which means I can run a cheap router and a good
firewall, the WAN IP for the firewall being the second address in the
extra block of two addresses I have. Enabling this was just a matter
of ticking a box with AAISP.


That was the attraction for me also (together with the rdns); however the
motivation for me now is that Zen only charge a few pounds more for an
uncapped 2Mbps with binary newsgroup access!

Thanks for the feedback.

Chris


  #6  
Old July 11th 05, 08:27 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
can2002
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7
Default Zen static IP

"S. V. Shah" wrote in message It is pretty much how
you describe your AAISP setup.

So out of the 8 IP addresses, 3 are used as follows:

1 assigned to the router, as a gateway
1 to represent the network
1 to represent a broadcast address


With AAISP in that I actually get 9 addresses. One addresses is assigned
via PPP that remains static (effectively a /32 address) and then I get a /28
block of addresses to use on the inside of my ADSL router.

What I did was to manually assign the highest address to the router
(to act as a gateway) as indicated by Zen. When I look in my router's
online status page it shows a 62.x.x.x address (not sure if this is
unique) allocated as a WAN address which links my router to a remote
system.


This is definitely sounding more promising, as it differs to what Zen told
me (to be fair it was sales) as it sounds like they're allocating a dynamic
PPP address, but then routing your static range to it.

I also use a mix of some real and some private IP addresses (mapped
within the router to real IP's) so the router's internal IP is
192.168.x.x and external IP is the allocated gateway IP.


I do the same at the moment; I'm running a Linux firewall with two internal
interfaces, one for my static block and another for a private range.

Thanks for helping here.

Regards,
Chris


  #7  
Old July 11th 05, 08:33 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
can2002
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7
Default Zen static IP

"Kris" wrote in message
Correct of kind of correct, I guess. If you have 81.5.175.97 at the
router's IP, your PC could have 81.5.175.98 with a gateway address of
81.5.175.97.


Agreed, if I'm given a /29 block of addresses to use on my internal LAN, of
the six available addresses one goes to my ADSL router and the remaining 5
to my internal hosts. My confusion relates to being told by Zen that the
same internal address will be assigned to the WAN (i.e. PPP interface) side
of my ADSL router. This implies I need an ADSL bridge rather than a router.

It will be done the same way as it is for AAISP.


With AAISP in that I actually get 9 addresses. One addresses is assigned
via PPP that remains static (effectively a /32 address) and then I get a /28
block of addresses to use on the inside of my ADSL router.

Thanks for the feedback though!

Cheers,
Chris


  #8  
Old July 11th 05, 08:38 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
can2002
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7
Default Zen static IP

"MA" wrote in message
...
It uses "ip unnumbered" - or whatever your routers manufacturer calls it.

From Cisco.com: "The ip unnumbered configuration command allows you to
enable IP processing on a serial interface without assigning it an
explicit
IP address. The ip unnumbered interface can "borrow" the IP address of
another interface already configured on the router, which conserves
network
and address space. "


Mmm... it sounds like we're back to the ADSL bridge idea. It sounds like
I'll need to keep digging to get a definitive answer. Some people have told
me I get a dynamically assigned PPP address to which they route my static
range, whereas others say it's bridged - ho hum!

Cheers,
Chris


  #9  
Old July 12th 05, 08:43 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Dave Reader
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 18
Default Zen static IP

can2002 [email protected] wrote:
"MA" wrote in message
...
It uses "ip unnumbered" - or whatever your routers manufacturer calls it.

From Cisco.com: "The ip unnumbered configuration command allows you to
enable IP processing on a serial interface without assigning it an
explicit
IP address. The ip unnumbered interface can "borrow" the IP address of
another interface already configured on the router, which conserves
network
and address space. "


Mmm... it sounds like we're back to the ADSL bridge idea. It sounds like
I'll need to keep digging to get a definitive answer. Some people have told
me I get a dynamically assigned PPP address to which they route my static
range, whereas others say it's bridged - ho hum!


The previous poster is correct - the PPP link is routed but unnumbered,
so the addresses you see used for the point to point link are..

1. at your end, the address on your router's lan port
2. at our end, the address of a loopback interface on our gateway

The address for your router is provided during PPP setup, and is static
(it'll always be the highest host address in your assignment).

How you should configure your router varies from manufacturer to
manufacturer. If in doubt, contact support and ask - they have
examples/guides for several models of router.

Regards,
Dave.

  #10  
Old July 26th 05, 06:16 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Andrew Hodgson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 161
Default Zen static IP

On Mon, 11 Jul 2005 20:19:31 +0100, "can2002"
[email protected] wrote:


"Andrew Hodgson" wrote in message
news
On Sat, 9 Jul 2005 11:25:15 +0100, "can2002"
The router's external (WAN) address is assigned by Zen and is static
or dynamic (I don't know which but with AAISP its static).


That makes sense, as per AAISP. The difference seems to be that the IP
address AAISP assign my PPP interface is in a totally different subnet from
my static ranges used on the Ethernet side of the ADSL router.


Yes, the subnets need to be different.

Andrew.
--
Andrew Hodgson in Bromyard, Herefordshire, UK.
My Email: use andrew at hodgsonfamily dot org.
 




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