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uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

Not basic broadband sharing, balancing



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 12th 05, 01:32 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking,uk.telecom.broadband,comp.os.linux.networking
Alex Bird
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 11
Default Not basic broadband sharing, balancing

Basically, for a short event, we wish to pay a local household to
upgrade their broadband for a month, and share this connection.
This might seem crazy unless you've seen what BT charge for short-term
leases, and how hard it would be on location.

One thing which concerns me is how we ensure we keep our part of the
bandwidth, say 1mbps, open. If they decide to download something from
a fast server, it could eat the connection! This would be v. bad!

How can we do a sort of reverse load-balancing ?

Cheers,
Alex

  #2  
Old July 12th 05, 01:45 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking,uk.telecom.broadband,comp.os.linux.networking
McSpreader
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 52
Default Not basic broadband sharing, balancing

"Alex Bird" wrote in
oups.com:

Basically, for a short event, we wish to pay a local household
to upgrade their broadband for a month, and share this
connection. This might seem crazy unless you've seen what BT
charge for short-term leases, and how hard it would be on
location.

One thing which concerns me is how we ensure we keep our part of
the bandwidth, say 1mbps, open. If they decide to download
something from a fast server, it could eat the connection! This
would be v. bad!

How can we do a sort of reverse load-balancing ?

Cheers,
Alex



Alex,

Draytek have routers with features that might do the biz for you,
e.g. the 2600Plus:

"Virtual LAN (VLAN) & Bandwidth Throttling

The Vigor 2600Plus's VLAN facility enables you to segment each of
the router's four Ethernet ports, so that each is a separate
virtual LAN. You can create VLAN groups which include or exclude
any of the ports so that groups, departments and companies can
communicate with each other, or not. For example, two companies
could share the same broadband feed, without having access to each
other's networks. For more details of VLAN, see here. The
'Bandwidth Throttling' feature lets you set a maximum throughput
for each of the Vigor's four Ethernet ports, which can prevent a
particular user (or segment) from taking all of your bandwidth.
"
  #3  
Old July 12th 05, 09:52 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking,uk.telecom.broadband,comp.os.linux.networking
Alex Bird
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 11
Default Not basic broadband sharing, balancing



McSpreader wrote:

The
'Bandwidth Throttling' feature lets you set a maximum throughput
for each of the Vigor's four Ethernet ports, which can prevent a
particular user (or segment) from taking all of your bandwidth.
"


That sounds ideal, I'll check it out, cheers,

Alex

  #4  
Old July 12th 05, 11:50 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking,uk.telecom.broadband,comp.os.linux.networking
Michael Heiming
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default Not basic broadband sharing, balancing

In comp.os.linux.networking Alex Bird :
Basically, for a short event, we wish to pay a local household to
upgrade their broadband for a month, and share this connection.
This might seem crazy unless you've seen what BT charge for short-term
leases, and how hard it would be on location.


One thing which concerns me is how we ensure we keep our part of the
bandwidth, say 1mbps, open. If they decide to download something from
a fast server, it could eat the connection! This would be v. bad!


Setup a Linux box as firewall/router/proxy, force transparent
proxying (squid), now you can adjust bandwidth using squid's delay
pools.

[..]

BTW
If you are replying from google groups do not use its default way
which does not quote the text you are replying to. This makes it
harder for people not using google groups to help you. IIRC
there is an option to show text and then you can use the reply
button at the bottom. Please use that, thx.

--
Michael Heiming (X-PGP-Sig GPG-Key ID: EDD27B94)
mail: echo | perl -pe 'y/a-z/n-za-m/'
#bofh excuse 199: the curls in your keyboard cord are losing
electricity.
  #6  
Old July 12th 05, 01:03 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking,uk.telecom.broadband,comp.os.linux.networking
Alex Fraser
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 553
Default Not basic broadband sharing, balancing

"Alex Bird" wrote in message
oups.com...
Basically, for a short event, we wish to pay a local household to
upgrade their broadband for a month, and share this connection.
This might seem crazy unless you've seen what BT charge for short-term
leases, and how hard it would be on location.

One thing which concerns me is how we ensure we keep our part of the
bandwidth, say 1mbps, open. If they decide to download something from
a fast server, it could eat the connection! This would be v. bad!


Using HTB under Linux you should be able to allocate bandwidth as you see
fit, with the added benefit (to both "them" and "you") of "borrowing" spare
bandwidth.

Additional/excessive latency caused by upstream use/saturation (ie from
uploading) will probably be a much bigger problem than the opposite
direction.

Alex


  #7  
Old July 12th 05, 10:36 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking,uk.telecom.broadband,comp.os.linux.networking
PiLGRiM
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5
Default Not basic broadband sharing, balancing

On 11 Jul 2005 17:32:39 -0700, "Alex Bird"
wrote:

Basically, for a short event, we wish to pay a local household to
upgrade their broadband for a month, and share this connection.
This might seem crazy unless you've seen what BT charge for short-term
leases, and how hard it would be on location.

One thing which concerns me is how we ensure we keep our part of the
bandwidth, say 1mbps, open. If they decide to download something from
a fast server, it could eat the connection! This would be v. bad!

How can we do a sort of reverse load-balancing ?

Cheers,
Alex


Use the Draytek. Cheaper and quicker to setup than a Linux box; ie no
need to build a box, then install an OS, then the firewall/packet
shaper, then learn how to configure it.. etc). Just spend 120 on the
router, install it, then set the VLAN and the QOS in one menu. You'll
be up and running in minutes. Oh, and you'd still need to connect the
Linux box to the dsl line too, if you took that route....
  #8  
Old July 16th 05, 12:00 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking,uk.telecom.broadband,comp.os.linux.networking
Alex Bird
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 11
Default Not basic broadband sharing, balancing



PiLGRiM wrote:
On 11 Jul 2005 17:32:39 -0700, "Alex Bird"
wrote:

Basically, for a short event, we wish to pay a local household to
upgrade their broadband for a month, and share this connection.
This might seem crazy unless you've seen what BT charge for short-term
leases, and how hard it would be on location.

One thing which concerns me is how we ensure we keep our part of the
bandwidth, say 1mbps, open. If they decide to download something from
a fast server, it could eat the connection! This would be v. bad!

How can we do a sort of reverse load-balancing ?

Cheers,
Alex


Use the Draytek. Cheaper and quicker to setup than a Linux box; ie no
need to build a box, then install an OS, then the firewall/packet
shaper, then learn how to configure it.. etc). Just spend 120 on the
router, install it, then set the VLAN and the QOS in one menu. You'll
be up and running in minutes. Oh, and you'd still need to connect the
Linux box to the dsl line too, if you took that route....



Okay, what I think we might do is use a linux box after all, though
using the m0n0wall traffic shaper, which is f***ing simple to set up.
Once you find a CF card/bios it likes.

I'm running it in at the moment to check it's stable. It wasn't, but I
put the recommended amount of memory in it and it seems okay now...

 




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