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uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

Wall mounting router



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 27th 05, 12:36 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking,uk.telecom.broadband
Jeremy Goff
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Posts: 14
Default Wall mounting router

I want to go wireless and am considering the NG DG834GT, my main criteria is
to wall mount but will this cause overheating of components? Comments
welcome on product and mounting.
Anyone had experience of wall mounting?

--
Replace "+" with "plus" to email me


  #2  
Old July 27th 05, 01:36 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
etomd
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4
Default Wall mounting router


"Jeremy Goff" wrote in message
...
I want to go wireless and am considering the NG DG834GT, my main criteria

is
to wall mount but will this cause overheating of components? Comments
welcome on product and mounting.
Anyone had experience of wall mounting?

--
Replace "+" with "plus" to email me

My Belkin router is wall mounted and in fact comes with screw holes on the
underside of the unit to do just that. No more surface area is covered
whether the unit sits on a desk or mounted on the wall so why should it
overheat?



  #3  
Old July 27th 05, 02:10 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking,uk.telecom.broadband
Phil Thompson
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Posts: 2,720
Default Wall mounting router

On Wed, 27 Jul 2005 12:36:44 +0100, "Jeremy Goff"
wrote:

Anyone had experience of wall mounting?


no, but quite a lot of kit has keyhole screw mounts for the purpose so
one imagines it is designed to do it.

Phil
--
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Come on down !
  #4  
Old July 27th 05, 02:14 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Phil Thompson
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Posts: 2,720
Default Wall mounting router

On Wed, 27 Jul 2005 13:36:53 +0100, "etomd" [email protected] wrote:

No more surface area is covered
whether the unit sits on a desk or mounted on the wall so why should it
overheat?


if all the holes were at the bottom when mounted it may be a problem.

PCI mainboards are not designed for tower cases, for example - the
graphics card heatsink is usually underneath the graphics card - duh !

Phil
--
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  #5  
Old July 27th 05, 02:23 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
kraftee
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,069
Default Wall mounting router

etomd wrote:
"Jeremy Goff" wrote in message
...
I want to go wireless and am considering the NG DG834GT, my main
criteria is to wall mount but will this cause overheating of
components? Comments welcome on product and mounting.
Anyone had experience of wall mounting?

--
Replace "+" with "plus" to email me

My Belkin router is wall mounted and in fact comes with screw holes
on the underside of the unit to do just that. No more surface area is
covered whether the unit sits on a desk or mounted on the wall so why
should it overheat?


With a lot of routers wall mounting can improve the air flow, hence
improving the cooling. Having said that IF the DG834GT is the same as the
DG834G v2 they don't supply any means to readily wallmount it, but they do
supply 2 plastic feet so you can have it vertically on a shelf.

I seem to recall a poster saying that they wall mounted one using 2 screws &
some sort of elastic/bungee cord between to hold the router in place
(granted not an elegant solution but if it works for them.......) ...

Now if I could find a way of improving the cooling on my Linksys WVC54G,
without resorting to drilling holes in the case I would be a very happy man.
Yes it does stop working if it gets to warm, it refused to work at all
during the 'heatwave'. Linksys say that they will replace if I can produce
a receipt, only problem is it was a gift & you've guessed it the people it
was from are not in the habit of keeping receipts...


  #6  
Old July 27th 05, 03:00 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
[email protected]
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Posts: 233
Default Wall mounting router

kraftee [email protected]&die wrote:

I seem to recall a poster saying that they wall mounted one using 2 screws &
some sort of elastic/bungee cord between to hold the router in place
(granted not an elegant solution but if it works for them.......) ...

That was me I suspect! :-)

Where the little box (whatever it is) has feet which are designed for
wall mounting then I hook it on screws as designed, but if there are no
'hook over screw' holes in the bottom then I put two cup hooks on the
wall either side of where the device is to be and hold it on with an
elastic band between the two cup hooks.

Puff, puff, that was a long sentence but I can't see any sensible way
to chop it up.

--
Chris Green

  #9  
Old July 27th 05, 04:27 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Richard Sobey
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Posts: 234
Default Wall mounting router

On Wed, 27 Jul 2005 14:23:34 +0100, "kraftee" [email protected]&die
wrote:


Now if I could find a way of improving the cooling on my Linksys WVC54G,
without resorting to drilling holes in the case I would be a very happy man.
Yes it does stop working if it gets to warm, it refused to work at all
during the 'heatwave'. Linksys say that they will replace if I can produce
a receipt, only problem is it was a gift & you've guessed it the people it
was from are not in the habit of keeping receipts...


Does that seem odd to you, or is it just me? Surely having the product
is proof of ownership enough simply to get a faulty device replaced!
I'd understand if it was a retailer saying this, but the manufacturer?

Having thought about it for a few more seconds, I guess it's down to
the warranty period...
  #10  
Old July 27th 05, 04:33 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking,uk.telecom.broadband
Andrew Oakley
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Posts: 37
Default Wall mounting router

On Wed, 27 Jul 2005 12:36:44 +0100, "Jeremy Goff"
wrote:
I want to go wireless and am considering the NG DG834GT, my main criteria is
to wall mount but will this cause overheating of components? Comments
welcome on product and mounting.


In general, have a look at where the air holes are on the product.
Generally you want those pointing up so that the hot air can rise out
of the box. If there are holes on more than one side, try to feel
around to see which are hotter and put those on the up side.

Another obvious thing to check is that it is possible to orient the
antenna upwards. Some have 3D swivels, some only 2D, some only 1D. If
your antenna has only 2D or 1D swivel, consider replacing the antenna
with one that is more flexible.

A final option is to keep your wireless router in place, and buy an
seperate access point which is more suited to wall mounting which you
can run in Repeater mode (not all access points offer this; check the
specs on the box).

Anyone had experience of wall mounting?


Yup. My D-Link access points have screw fittings moulded in the base
and a 3D antenna swivel. I have one sitting on the shelf in my study
connected to my router (via a Linux server), another screwed to the
wall in my garden shed acting as a repeater.

Also consider "power over ethernet", whereby you can run DC voltage
over normal LAN cable, if you have a particular problem placing your
access point (eg. in the loft where there may be no mains electricity
outlets). Most brands can have this feature, you normally have to buy
a seperate Power Over Ethernet kit.

--
Andrew Oakley andrew/atsymbol/aoakley/stop/com
 




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