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uk.telecom.voip (UK VOIP) (uk.telecom.voip) Discussion of topics relevant to packet based voice technologies including Voice over IP (VoIP), Fax over IP (FoIP), Voice over Frame Relay (VoFR), Voice over Broadband (VoB) and Voice on the Net (VoN) as well as service providers, hardware and software for use with these technologies. Advertising is not allowed.

10Base-T VIP network adapter Grandstream Handytone-486



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 20th 05, 09:53 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Lester
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 13
Default 10Base-T VIP network adapter Grandstream Handytone-486

An educational, if cautionary, tale - I just bought a Grandstream
Handytone-486, which actually does what I wanted very effectively except
it can only run 10Base-T, it can't do 100. Consequently it won't fit
into my network (though it runs if I put it in line with the cable
modem, of course, while throttling all upstream communication).

Is this limitation common, or did I just trip over a rare event? It
never crossed my mind to check whether 10/100Base-T was built in, since
the device is meant to carry the main network traffic. It's an age since
I saw plain 10Base-T on anything sold new. It'll bottleneck any WAN or
LAN space that I connect it to. It can't pass through my 100Base-T hubs.

The limitation isn't mentioned on or inside the box - it's on page 4 and
7 of the User Manual, which isn't provided.

Would anyone with experience like to recommend an alternative?
  #2  
Old October 20th 05, 10:36 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Heimo Hetl
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Posts: 23
Default 10Base-T VIP network adapter Grandstream Handytone-486

Lester wrote:

Is this limitation common, or did I just trip over a rare event? It
never crossed my mind to check whether 10/100Base-T was built in, since
the device is meant to carry the main network traffic. It's an age since
I saw plain 10Base-T on anything sold new. It'll bottleneck any WAN or
LAN space that I connect it to. It can't pass through my 100Base-T hubs.


Why don't you just hook it up to a switch behind your router? The 10BT
link is more than sufficient for the single phone line the ATA provides
and it won't pull down the rest your LAN. Worked perfectly for me.

Would anyone with experience like to recommend an alternative?


Sipura? I just exchanged my ATA-486 for a SPA-2002. It has two phone
lines (which was the reason for me to switch boxes), supports two user
accounts, and has loads of additional settings all of which I don't
need.

I would not want to pipe all my network traffic through one of these
flimsy boxes anyway.

cheers
Heimo

--
You never ask questions when God's on your side.
  #3  
Old October 20th 05, 10:44 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Ivor Jones
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Posts: 3,969
Default 10Base-T VIP network adapter Grandstream Handytone-486



"Heimo Hetl" wrote in message

Lester wrote:

Is this limitation common, or did I just trip over a
rare event? It never crossed my mind to check whether
10/100Base-T was built in, since the device is meant to
carry the main network traffic. It's an age since I saw
plain 10Base-T on anything sold new. It'll bottleneck
any WAN or LAN space that I connect it to. It can't
pass through my 100Base-T hubs.


Why don't you just hook it up to a switch behind your
router? The 10BT link is more than sufficient for the
single phone line the ATA provides and it won't pull down
the rest your LAN. Worked perfectly for me.


That's what I'd suggest also. I have a Sipura SPA-2000 behind my router
and it works perfectly. No reason the Grandstream can't do the same.

Ivor


  #4  
Old October 21st 05, 04:18 AM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Lester
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 13
Default 10Base-T VIP network adapter Grandstream Handytone-486

Ivor Jones wrote:
"Heimo Hetl" wrote in message


Why don't you just hook it up to a switch behind your
router? The 10BT link is more than sufficient for the
single phone line the ATA provides and it won't pull down
the rest your LAN. Worked perfectly for me.


That's what I'd suggest also. I have a Sipura SPA-2000 behind my router
and it works perfectly. No reason the Grandstream can't do the same.


The router's three floors away, is the simple answer. I have a cable
that gets to the floor I need, but it's been past the 100Base-T hubs by
then. I'd like to restrain my spend, and I'd like to stick to my current
cable set.

Thank you both - I think part of the clue is that the SPA-2000 is
10Base-T as well. These boxes are evidently intended for use in shunting
yards rather than on the mainline tracks.

I do wish equipment had less meaningful names than "switch" - key that
into Google to find out what it does, and you have needles and haystacks
to contend with... OK, "It's the perfect way of integrating 10Mbps
Ethernet and 100Mbps Fast Ethernet devices, too. All five ports are auto
speed negotiating". That sounds like what I need. The 100Base-T cable to
this floor, a newly-bought switch, and the 100Base-T computer on one
port and the ATA-486 phone adaptor on a second port.

If I plug
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=5821326130 in, I
should be close to success?
  #5  
Old October 21st 05, 09:17 AM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Heimo Hetl
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 23
Default 10Base-T VIP network adapter Grandstream Handytone-486

Lester wrote:

Thank you both - I think part of the clue is that the SPA-2000 is
10Base-T as well. These boxes are evidently intended for use in shunting
yards rather than on the mainline tracks.


I didn't even notice the Sipura is 10BT as well. However, since the SPA
2002 has a single ethernet port only with no provision for passing other
network traffic through it, this doesn't matter at all.

The case with the Grandstream 486 seems to be that its built-in
NAT/Gateway/Router functionalities are intended for use directly between
the cable/dsl/whatever modem and the ret of the LAN. In this
constellation it doesn't harm network speed unless you have more than
10MBit on your DSL :-)

I do wish equipment had less meaningful names than "switch" - key that
into Google to find out what it does, and you have needles and haystacks
to contend with...


What you called a 100Base-T Hub is really a switch. It looks like a hub,
works like a hub, it's just a little smarter.

If I plug
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=5821326130 in, I
should be close to success?


Absolutely.

cheers
Heimo

--
You never ask questions when God's on your side.
  #6  
Old October 21st 05, 05:40 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
dincs
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 13
Default 10Base-T VIP network adapter Grandstream Handytone-486

On Fri, 21 Oct 2005 03:18:37 GMT, Lester said...
|The router's three floors away, is the simple answer. I have a cable
|that gets to the floor I need, but it's been past the 100Base-T hubs by
|then. I'd like to restrain my spend, and I'd like to stick to my current
|cable set.
|
|Thank you both - I think part of the clue is that the SPA-2000 is
|10Base-T as well. These boxes are evidently intended for use in shunting
|yards rather than on the mainline tracks.
|
|I do wish equipment had less meaningful names than "switch" - key that
|into Google to find out what it does, and you have needles and haystacks
|to contend with... OK, "It's the perfect way of integrating 10Mbps
|Ethernet and 100Mbps Fast Ethernet devices, too. All five ports are auto
|speed negotiating". That sounds like what I need. The 100Base-T cable to
|this floor, a newly-bought switch, and the 100Base-T computer on one
|port and the ATA-486 phone adaptor on a second port.
|
|If I plug
|http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=5821326130 in, I
|should be close to success?
|

If you are restrained by a single cable to the point of delivery, there is
a cheaper solution.
If the RJ45 sockets are fully connected (on ALL 8 pins, a wise engineer
should have done that), you can buy a couple of adapters to "split" the
cable in two 10/100baseT connections (less than 5 quid).
You can then run a 100Mb device connection AND a 10Mb device connection on
the same "cable".
Obviously you've got to split the connection at the other end too.
That way, you can link the 100Mb device(s) to a router port and the
GrandStream on another port.
The router ports MUST be "switching" ports, or the whole network will
fallback to a 10Mb speed.

N.B. With VoIP devices, try to avoid too much devices on the chain, to
avoid lagging. A switch necessarily adds some delay in TCP/IP packets
dispatching, and if it's an "el cheapo" brand, I don't recommend it.

--
dincs The Y2K Druid
I'm watching you...
.oOo. (_) .oOo.

  #7  
Old October 23rd 05, 09:13 AM posted to uk.telecom.voip
7
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 183
Default 10Base-T VIP network adapter Grandstream Handytone-486

Lester wrote:

Ivor Jones wrote:
"Heimo Hetl" wrote in message


Why don't you just hook it up to a switch behind your
router? The 10BT link is more than sufficient for the
single phone line the ATA provides and it won't pull down
the rest your LAN. Worked perfectly for me.


That's what I'd suggest also. I have a Sipura SPA-2000 behind my router
and it works perfectly. No reason the Grandstream can't do the same.


The router's three floors away, is the simple answer. I have a cable
that gets to the floor I need, but it's been past the 100Base-T hubs by
then. I'd like to restrain my spend, and I'd like to stick to my current
cable set.



Eh?
A 4 port 10/100 switch costs less than 10 pounds. What is your
problem? You put it at the other end of the cable right where
you intend to plug in the ATA. And then plug the ATA into the
switch.
http://www.ebuyer.com/customer/produ...duct_uid=63777



  #8  
Old October 23rd 05, 12:54 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Andrew Hodgson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 161
Default 10Base-T VIP network adapter Grandstream Handytone-486

On Thu, 20 Oct 2005 20:53:00 GMT, Lester wrote:

An educational, if cautionary, tale - I just bought a Grandstream
Handytone-486, which actually does what I wanted very effectively except
it can only run 10Base-T, it can't do 100. Consequently it won't fit
into my network (though it runs if I put it in line with the cable
modem, of course, while throttling all upstream communication).


You have a larger than 10mbit link? I would never put these devices
on my network as a router anyway.

Is this limitation common, or did I just trip over a rare event? It
never crossed my mind to check whether 10/100Base-T was built in, since
the device is meant to carry the main network traffic. It's an age since
I saw plain 10Base-T on anything sold new. It'll bottleneck any WAN or
LAN space that I connect it to. It can't pass through my 100Base-T hubs.


Why is this - if they are switches they will work fine - plug the
equipment into one of the ports, all other equipment should run at 100
base t and the adaptor will continue at 10 base t. You may notice the
light colour on the switch is different.

Andrew.
--
Andrew Hodgson in Bromyard, Herefordshire, UK.
My Email: use andrew at hodgsonfamily dot org.
  #9  
Old October 24th 05, 10:51 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Lester
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 13
Default 10Base-T VIP network adapter Grandstream Handytone-486

Andrew Hodgson wrote:

You have a larger than 10mbit link? I would never put these devices
on my network as a router anyway.


Not larger. It is a 10Mbit link, the blueyonder one. It slows if there's
a 10Mbit component in the system - something to do with traffic
overheads, perhaps. I'm slowly working out what each type of box does,
within my own network. The thing that would slow dramatically with a
10MBit bottleneck - by a factor of 6 or so, which is why I went looking
for a fix - is the networked mass storage access between floors, not the
Internet.

Is this limitation common, or did I just trip over a rare event? It
never crossed my mind to check whether 10/100Base-T was built in, since
the device is meant to carry the main network traffic. It's an age since
I saw plain 10Base-T on anything sold new. It'll bottleneck any WAN or
LAN space that I connect it to. It can't pass through my 100Base-T hubs.


Why is this - if they are switches they will work fine - plug the
equipment into one of the ports, all other equipment should run at 100
base t and the adaptor will continue at 10 base t. You may notice the
light colour on the switch is different.


That's why I said hubs - they're not switches. I've got it cleared now,
by swapping switch and hub boxes so that the right functions are now in
the right places.

Thanks, all, for the ideas.
  #10  
Old October 24th 05, 10:58 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Lester
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 13
Default 10Base-T VIP network adapter Grandstream Handytone-486

7 wrote:
Eh?
A 4 port 10/100 switch costs less than 10 pounds. What is your
problem? You put it at the other end of the cable right where
you intend to plug in the ATA. And then plug the ATA into the
switch.


It's not the cost, it's discovering that such things as switches exist.
Perhaps you know of a readable introduction to novice networking which
mentions switch, hub, router and the various protocols that need passing
by each in order to VoIP? I'd happily work through it and pick up the
missing knowledge. I have a clue how to configure TCP/IP addressing, but
the other protocols that seem to exist are just acronyms to me. UDP
springs to mind.
 




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