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uk.comp.home-networking (UK home networking) (uk.comp.home-networking) Discussion of all aspects of computer networking in the home, regardless of the platforms, software, topologies and protocols used. Examples of topics include recommendations for hardware or suppliers (e.g. NICs and cabling), protocols, servers, and specific network software. Advertising is not allowed.

Wireless Fall Back



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 11th 03, 07:15 PM posted to comp.os.linux.networking,microsoft.public.win98.networking,uk.comp.home-networking
Geoff Lane
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 187
Default Wireless Fall Back

I've got a small home network which consists of wired and wireless
sections.

The range is very eratic on my wireless section and nowhere near what
the manufacturers suggest is possible (in ideal conditions).

I live in a 1930s brick built bungalow so there is no special
insulation causing problems.

My Netgear PC card appears to work OK with my Netgear 54mbps Access
Point but I appear to be getting about 30 feet only out of a new
Linksys 11mbps USB adapter. This is a moveable device with an aerial
so I was actually expecting it to be better than the Netgear PC card.

Anyone any ideas how to know if the automatic fall back is working, my
Linksys software monitor appears to suggest it stays at 11mbps as the
signal drops.

Geoff Lane

  #2  
Old October 12th 03, 07:58 PM posted to comp.os.linux.networking,microsoft.public.win98.networking,uk.comp.home-networking
Jordan Freeland
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Wireless Fall Back

In most cases, using network devices made from the same manufacturer works
best. If you have rpoblems with wireless quality and strength, here are a
few suggestions:
1. Go wired when possible
2. Aim your antennas correctly or get better ones (omni-directionals are
ideal)
3. Try different channels on your WLAN
4. Make sure your RX/TX power is set to the highest possible
or if you really want better range,
5. Get a signal booster for your AP/Router, if NetGear makes them.

"Geoff Lane" wrote in message
...
I've got a small home network which consists of wired and wireless
sections.

The range is very eratic on my wireless section and nowhere near what
the manufacturers suggest is possible (in ideal conditions).

I live in a 1930s brick built bungalow so there is no special
insulation causing problems.

My Netgear PC card appears to work OK with my Netgear 54mbps Access
Point but I appear to be getting about 30 feet only out of a new
Linksys 11mbps USB adapter. This is a moveable device with an aerial
so I was actually expecting it to be better than the Netgear PC card.

Anyone any ideas how to know if the automatic fall back is working, my
Linksys software monitor appears to suggest it stays at 11mbps as the
signal drops.

Geoff Lane



  #3  
Old October 12th 03, 08:53 PM posted to comp.os.linux.networking,microsoft.public.win98.networking,uk.comp.home-networking
Geoff Lane
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 187
Default Wireless Fall Back

On Sun, 12 Oct 2003 11:58:55 -0700, "Jordan Freeland"
wrote:

I've got a small home network which consists of wired and wireless
sections.

The range is very eratic on my wireless section and nowhere near what
the manufacturers suggest is possible (in ideal conditions).


In most cases, using network devices made from the same manufacturer works
best.


I would have stayed with Netgear except that the Linksys USB was more
suitable for the circunstances and the Dell was supplied with the
handheld.

If you have rpoblems with wireless quality and strength, here are a
few suggestions:
1. Go wired when possible


As mentioned I have a mixture.

2. Aim your antennas correctly or get better ones (omni-directionals are
ideal)


How do you aim it, mine is like a stick, I thought vertical was the
best.

3. Try different channels on your WLAN


Tried that with my Dell card, made no difference, haven't tried it
with the Linksys

4. Make sure your RX/TX power is set to the highest possible
or if you really want better range,


Is that a card setting or an AP setting - I can only recall it in
relation to a modem.

5. Get a signal booster for your AP/Router, if NetGear makes them.


New to WiFi so am not sure if Netgear make one or not.

Geoff Lane




  #4  
Old October 12th 03, 08:57 PM posted to comp.os.linux.networking,microsoft.public.win98.networking,uk.comp.home-networking
Vincent Fox
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6
Default Wireless Fall Back

"Jordan Freeland" writes:

The range is very eratic on my wireless section and nowhere near what
the manufacturers suggest is possible (in ideal conditions).


Why would you expect that it would? Ideal conditions consists of
an open field with no obstructions.

I live in a 1930s brick built bungalow so there is no special
insulation causing problems.


2.4 GHz is easily attenuated by so much as some tree leaves
in the line of sight. I know because I had bridged two houses
about a block apart during winter. Come spring the leaves
started causing me problems had to trim some branches.

Now lets talk about sheet rock. Causes minimal problems when
you are shooting straight through only one layer. Now take a laptop
and watch the signal go down as you move it so it goes through the
same sheet rock at a long angle, so that much of the line of sight
is within the body of that sheet. Also water pipes and such can
cause you problems. Brick is probably a decent stopper too
if there's enough thickness of it.

Not to mention that 2.4 GHz is also the range used for microwave
ovens, those X-10 cameras, cordless phones etc. Any one of which when
switched on will cause problems. And your neighbor may switch on
his 802.11b network on top of that. Good to try switching
channels on the AP and see if that lessens interference and
thus increases range. I used to work in a building with lots
of cordless phones and I managed to acquire a bunch of 900 MHz
phones and convince people to squash the 2.4 GHz purchases.

Usual recommendation is you are better served by putting up a
second AP than a booster. Boosters are a poor solution IMHO
mainly because they contribute to area frequency pollution and
tend to drown out weaker devices. Just run ethernet to a convenient
location for placing the second AP. Like this:

----WAN---ROUTER/SWITCH--------AP1-Ch.1
|
|
|
AP2-Ch.11


--
Vincent Fox
Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta Georgia, 30332
uucp: ...!{decvax,hplabs,ncar,purdue,rutgers}!gatech!pri sm!vf5
Internet:
  #5  
Old October 12th 03, 09:06 PM posted to comp.os.linux.networking,microsoft.public.win98.networking,uk.comp.home-networking
Vincent Fox
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6
Default Wireless Fall Back

Geoff Lane writes:

How do you aim it, mine is like a stick, I thought vertical was the
best.


Omnis have roughly a donut pattern with the aerial through
the center of it. They radiate out best from the sides of
the aerial not the ends. So for example if it is straight up
and mounted in the attic, you may have a signal "black hole"
in the areas directly below it. Lets say you put it high
in one end of the house, in that case you may want to tilt
the antennas a bit so one side of it's radiation pattern
is hitting the greatest area of your house and the other side
is just going out uselessly into the sky.

3. Try different channels on your WLAN


Change channels on the AP, the client card just scans and
finds whatever the AP is using, so changing it on the card
will not stick.


--
Vincent Fox
Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta Georgia, 30332
uucp: ...!{decvax,hplabs,ncar,purdue,rutgers}!gatech!pri sm!vf5
Internet:
  #6  
Old October 12th 03, 11:43 PM posted to comp.os.linux.networking,microsoft.public.win98.networking,uk.comp.home-networking
Geoff Lane
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 187
Default Wireless Fall Back

On Sun, 12 Oct 2003 19:57:59 +0000 (UTC),
(Vincent Fox) wrote:

The range is very eratic on my wireless section and nowhere near what
the manufacturers suggest is possible (in ideal conditions).


Why would you expect that it would? Ideal conditions consists of
an open field with no obstructions.


Naivety perhaps, believing the LARGE print :-))) Seriously, the
claimed 300 feet in an indoor environment I believe was very
optimistic but I was hoping for a bit more than 30 feet, perhaps even
at a lower speed.

I live in a 1930s brick built bungalow so there is no special
insulation causing problems.


2.4 GHz is easily attenuated by so much as some tree leaves
in the line of sight.


I thought it was only UK railways that were affected by leaves.

I know because I had bridged two houses
about a block apart during winter. Come spring the leaves
started causing me problems had to trim some branches.


The wire is looking better by the minute.

Not to mention that 2.4 GHz is also the range used for microwave
ovens, those X-10 cameras, cordless phones etc.


Guessed as much but my cordless phone is brilliant throughout the
house, even beyond a brick wall and 60 feet up my garden.

Usual recommendation is you are better served by putting up a
second AP than a booster.


I will look in to that, I've got a wired system as well as the
wireless one now so I am not going to dispence with it.

The wireless is brilliant for the laptop and the small handheld I have
recently bought so I will just adjust the position of the devices.

Just run ethernet to a convenient
location for placing the second AP. Like this:

----WAN---ROUTER/SWITCH--------AP1-Ch.1
|
|
|
AP2-Ch.11


Thanks, I can understand that.

Curiosity, with your network did you use devices from the same
manufacturer, I've been led to believe they work better that way or is
that just referring to the setting up.

Geoff Lane

  #7  
Old October 13th 03, 03:31 AM posted to comp.os.linux.networking,microsoft.public.win98.networking,uk.comp.home-networking
Vincent Fox
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6
Default Wireless Fall Back

Geoff Lane writes:

On Sun, 12 Oct 2003 19:57:59 +0000 (UTC),
(Vincent Fox) wrote:


The range is very eratic on my wireless section and nowhere near what
the manufacturers suggest is possible (in ideal conditions).


Why would you expect that it would? Ideal conditions consists of
an open field with no obstructions.


Naivety perhaps, believing the LARGE print :-))) Seriously, the
claimed 300 feet in an indoor environment I believe was very
optimistic but I was hoping for a bit more than 30 feet, perhaps even
at a lower speed.


Sometimes I get the problem that particular units do not
like each other. For example the Linksys cards don't seem
to have very much range at all for me, whereas the Orinoco
card can pick up my D-Link AP from half a block outside the house.

I live in a 1930s brick built bungalow so there is no special
insulation causing problems.


2.4 GHz is easily attenuated by so much as some tree leaves
in the line of sight.


I thought it was only UK railways that were affected by leaves.


I know because I had bridged two houses
about a block apart during winter. Come spring the leaves
started causing me problems had to trim some branches.


The wire is looking better by the minute.


Not to mention that 2.4 GHz is also the range used for microwave
ovens, those X-10 cameras, cordless phones etc.


Guessed as much but my cordless phone is brilliant throughout the
house, even beyond a brick wall and 60 feet up my garden.


Is your cordless a 2.4 GHz unit and is it out of the
base unit when you have more problems? When cordless
are off their base, they are still chatting to the base
unit and creating interference even though you are
not using it for a call.

Usual recommendation is you are better served by putting up a
second AP than a booster.


I will look in to that, I've got a wired system as well as the
wireless one now so I am not going to dispence with it.


The wireless is brilliant for the laptop and the small handheld I have
recently bought so I will just adjust the position of the devices.


Just run ethernet to a convenient
location for placing the second AP. Like this:

----WAN---ROUTER/SWITCH--------AP1-Ch.1
|
|
|
AP2-Ch.11


Thanks, I can understand that.


Curiosity, with your network did you use devices from the same
manufacturer, I've been led to believe they work better that way or is
that just referring to the setting up.


They are all supposed to interoperate. However sometimes you
have to mess with the settings a bit to make it work better.
I find Linksys cards don't seem to me to have much
range at all compared to SMC or Orinoco/Agere/Avaya cards.
I am using an Orinoco gold with a D-Link 900AP+ as the AP
and it seems to work very well.


--
Vincent Fox
Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta Georgia, 30332
uucp: ...!{decvax,hplabs,ncar,purdue,rutgers}!gatech!pri sm!vf5
Internet:

 




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