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uk.comp.home-networking (UK home networking) (uk.comp.home-networking) Discussion of all aspects of computer networking in the home, regardless of the platforms, software, topologies and protocols used. Examples of topics include recommendations for hardware or suppliers (e.g. NICs and cabling), protocols, servers, and specific network software. Advertising is not allowed.

Dynamic Network Addresses



 
 
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  #1  
Old November 16th 03, 11:23 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking,comp.os.linux.networking
Geoff Lane
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Posts: 187
Default Dynamic Network Addresses

To date I've issued static IP addresses within my small home network.

When I go broadband I will probably use DHCP for address allocation,
how do I check any network connections using PING if I don't actually
know its IP address?

Geoff Lane

  #2  
Old November 16th 03, 11:44 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking,comp.os.linux.networking
Jem Berkes
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Posts: 1
Default Dynamic Network Addresses

To date I've issued static IP addresses within my small home network.

When I go broadband I will probably use DHCP for address allocation,
how do I check any network connections using PING if I don't actually
know its IP address?


I don't really understand what you're asking. I'm presuming you have a LAN
with hosts using private IP addresses, connected to the Internet via a
single IP using NAT.

If your ISP starts using DHCP, this has no effect on the hosts within your
LAN (which have 10.x.x.x or 192.168.x.x addresses)

--
Jem Berkes
http://www.sysdesign.ca/
  #3  
Old November 17th 03, 01:15 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking,comp.os.linux.networking
Leon.
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Posts: 2
Default Dynamic Network Addresses


"Geoff Lane" wrote in message
...
To date I've issued static IP addresses within my small home network.

When I go broadband I will probably use DHCP for address allocation,
how do I check any network connections using PING if I don't actually
know its IP address?


Well that sounds like a good reason NOT to use DHCP on the home network.

If you really do want to use DHCP, you can

1. assume that if the computer gets an ip address from DHCP, then its got a
network connection.



2. learn to read the current IP address of machines , eg ifconfig on linux,
winipcfg for Windows gui. ipconfig on Windows command prompt.

3. use dynamic dns clients, so that a machine registers itself when it boots

4. there's a microsoft scheme similar to dynamic DNS too.



Geoff Lane



  #4  
Old November 17th 03, 06:52 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking,comp.os.linux.networking
Ivor Cave
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Posts: 1
Default Dynamic Network Addresses

Geoff Lane wrote:
To date I've issued static IP addresses within my small home network.

When I go broadband I will probably use DHCP for address allocation,
how do I check any network connections using PING if I don't actually
know its IP address?

Geoff Lane


Set up dhcp to give static ip addresses based on the MAC addresses
of the computers on your network.

Ivor Cave

  #5  
Old November 17th 03, 07:11 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking,comp.os.linux.networking
Graham
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Posts: 54
Default Dynamic Network Addresses

On Sun, 16 Nov 2003 23:23:03 +0000, Geoff Lane wrote:

To date I've issued static IP addresses within my small home network.

When I go broadband I will probably use DHCP for address allocation, how
do I check any network connections using PING if I don't actually know its
IP address?

Geoff Lane



A good compromise is to issue static addresses to your permanent machines
either manually or by configuring your DHCP server to allocate specific
addresses to their MAC addresses (If your DHCP server will do that). Then
use DHCP to allocate a range on the same subnet for guest computers.
Eg:-

static1 = 192.168.0.1
static2 = 192.168.0.2
static3 = 192.168.0.3

DHCP range = 192.168.0.21 to 192.168.0.100

router = 192.168.0.254

graham

  #6  
Old November 17th 03, 03:50 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking,comp.os.linux.networking
Bernard Peek
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Posts: 202
Default Dynamic Network Addresses

In message , Geoff Lane
writes
To date I've issued static IP addresses within my small home network.

When I go broadband I will probably use DHCP for address allocation,
how do I check any network connections using PING if I don't actually
know its IP address?


I assume that you are going to get a broadband router with a DHCP
server. This can assign dynamic addresses to the machines on your
internal network.

First, there's no real reason why you should use DHCP just because it's
there. You can continue with your existing static addresses on the local
network. What advantage does DHCP offer you?

If you have workstations with dynamic addresses then you need to ping
them by name and not by IP address.


--
Bernard Peek
London, UK. DBA, Manager, Trainer & Author. Will work for money.

  #7  
Old November 17th 03, 04:31 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking,comp.os.linux.networking
Carl Farrington
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Posts: 1
Default Dynamic Network Addresses

Ivor Cave wrote:
Geoff Lane wrote:
To date I've issued static IP addresses within my small home network.

When I go broadband I will probably use DHCP for address allocation,
how do I check any network connections using PING if I don't actually
know its IP address?

Geoff Lane


Set up dhcp to give static ip addresses based on the MAC addresses
of the computers on your network.

Ivor Cave


Not necessary in my experience. Hosts are always assigned the same address..
learn what that address is and remember it - or use dynamic dns registration
and ping by hostname


  #8  
Old November 17th 03, 04:33 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking,comp.os.linux.networking
Dale Dellutri
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Posts: 1
Default Dynamic Network Addresses

On Sun, 16 Nov 2003 23:23:03 +0000, in comp.os.linux.networking Geoff Lane wrote:
To date I've issued static IP addresses within my small home network.
When I go broadband I will probably use DHCP for address allocation,
how do I check any network connections using PING if I don't actually
know its IP address?


Your router will probably have a management interface that you can
query to find the attached IP addresses. The exact interface depends
on the router. My old Netgear RT311 had three: a serial console port,
telnet and a simple webserver.

But there's no need to change to DHCP just because you're getting
broadband.

--
Dale Dellutri (lose the Q's)
  #9  
Old November 17th 03, 05:38 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking,comp.os.linux.networking
Geoff Lane
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 187
Default Dynamic Network Addresses

On Mon, 17 Nov 2003 16:33:24 +0000 (UTC), Dale Dellutri
wrote:


To date I've issued static IP addresses within my small home network.
When I go broadband I will probably use DHCP for address allocation,


But there's no need to change to DHCP just because you're getting
broadband.


I appreciate that, I have been confusing myself a wee bit with
changing which computer acts as a server under my present set up.

Geoff Lane


  #10  
Old November 17th 03, 08:56 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking,comp.os.linux.networking
Douglas Clinton
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Posts: 1
Default Dynamic Network Addresses

On Mon, 17 Nov 2003 07:11:09 +0000, Graham wrote:

On Sun, 16 Nov 2003 23:23:03 +0000, Geoff Lane wrote:

To date I've issued static IP addresses within my small home network.

When I go broadband I will probably use DHCP for address allocation, how
do I check any network connections using PING if I don't actually know its
IP address?

Geoff Lane



A good compromise is to issue static addresses to your permanent machines
either manually or by configuring your DHCP server to allocate specific
addresses to their MAC addresses (If your DHCP server will do that). Then
use DHCP to allocate a range on the same subnet for guest computers.
Eg:-

static1 = 192.168.0.1
static2 = 192.168.0.2
static3 = 192.168.0.3

DHCP range = 192.168.0.21 to 192.168.0.100

router = 192.168.0.254

graham


You will find that the ip's issued by your dhcp server are not very
dynamic.

The dhcp server will issue the same ip's to your LAN machines everytime
you reboot them.

Unless you change the NIC.

--
GNU/Linux is God
get used to it

Linux User # 276385

 




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