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uk.comp.home-networking (UK home networking) (uk.comp.home-networking) Discussion of all aspects of computer networking in the home, regardless of the platforms, software, topologies and protocols used. Examples of topics include recommendations for hardware or suppliers (e.g. NICs and cabling), protocols, servers, and specific network software. Advertising is not allowed.

wiring and future-proofing my new home



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 9th 04, 01:04 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Rob Morley
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,379
Default wiring and future-proofing my new home

In article , "Ashirus" usenet-

says...
Hi. I just bought my new house (2 story semi-detached in North West London)
and I want to wire it up so that i'll be able to easily network 3-4
computers around the house when we move in. from my rudementary computing
knowledge, i'm guessing i just need to run a bunch of cat5 cables between
the rooms, each ending with an RJ45 plug.


At least one double wallplate (that's a socket, not a plug) in each
room, maybe a couple on opposite walls. And it's a good idea to run
more cables than you need at the moment and just leave them unterminated
in the wall - cable is cheap.

The thing is, i will want the
fastest network available and will want to upgrade this to a faster network
in years to come.

Assuming that for now i will using gigabit ethanet, will cat5 suffice?


No point using less than Cat6. I'm not sure you can even easily find
Cat5 anymore - everything has been Cat5e for a while now.

Is there any point in installing fibre-optic (if so, how does gigabit
ethanet interface with fibre-optic)?


Probably a bit expensive to install fibre unless you know you're going
to use it.

Does it make a differance where my server or router will be or if i'll have
a peer-to-peer networking?


Structured cabling runs everything to a central point (like the cupboard
under the stairs) and uses patch panels to connect cables together as
needed.

ps-the electrician doing up the house doesn't have much knowledge of
networking, so will be relying on my instructions

Make sure your instructions are good then :-) Have a look at some
websites (I just Googled these - they look like the right sort of thing
but I only glanced at them, some may be a bit dated:

http://www.broadbandhomecentral.com/structured.html
http://www.home-automation-solutions...tured-cabling-
wiring.shtml
http://www.quantometrix.com/wiring.htm
http://www.combsnet.com/cable/
)

If you're still unsure of design and installation requirements after
reading a bit it might be better to use a specialised contractor who
offers a design and install service. I'd be a bit dubious of using a
sparky who wasn't familiar with the specific requirements of network
installation, and didn't have the right test equipment - there's not
much point saving money at this stage if you find that the installation
doesn't perform to spec or meet your requirements a couple of years down
the line.
  #2  
Old September 9th 04, 01:09 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Mutley
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7
Default wiring and future-proofing my new home


"Ashirus"
usenet-replyATashirusnwNO_SPAM.freeserve.co.ukDeleteFollo
wrote in message ...


You're better off going wireless...
much easier and no cables to lay.

Mutely.


  #3  
Old September 9th 04, 01:29 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Ashirus
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8
Default wiring and future-proofing my new home

Hi. I just bought my new house (2 story semi-detached in North West London)
and I want to wire it up so that i'll be able to easily network 3-4
computers around the house when we move in. from my rudementary computing
knowledge, i'm guessing i just need to run a bunch of cat5 cables between
the rooms, each ending with an RJ45 plug. The thing is, i will want the
fastest network available and will want to upgrade this to a faster network
in years to come.

Assuming that for now i will using gigabit ethanet, will cat5 suffice?

Is there any point in installing fibre-optic (if so, how does gigabit
ethanet interface with fibre-optic)?

Does it make a differance where my server or router will be or if i'll have
a peer-to-peer networking?

ps-the electrician doing up the house doesn't have much knowledge of
networking, so will be relying on my instructions

THANKS
ASHIRUS


  #4  
Old September 9th 04, 06:54 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Ashirus
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8
Default wiring and future-proofing my new home

sigh didn't I ask about cabling a house that's being refurbished? you
don't *have* to reply just because you won a keyboard!

the point of wireless is for big open spaces, between office blocks or when
a building is in place and it's too hard to install cabling.

No-one denies laying cable when you can (as in my case where I'm already
wiring and refurbishing the house) is far better. How can you can compare
the 25Kbps of even Wifi 54G with Gigabit wired ethernet?

Wireless in homes (especially on two stories) causes endless problems with
interference, the added cost. The best way is definitely to install cabling
first, and then afterwards maybe a access point near the garden for wireless
roaming.

--
Even as a networking newbie, I know that,
Ash.
"Mutley" wrote in message
...

"Ashirus"

usenet-replyATashirusnwNO_SPAM.freeserve.co.ukDeleteFollo
wrote in message ...


You're better off going wireless...
much easier and no cables to lay.

Mutely.




  #5  
Old September 9th 04, 07:02 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Ashirus
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8
Default wiring and future-proofing my new home

Thanks a lot, see below inline for questions, please:

"Rob Morley" wrote in message
t...
In article , "Ashirus" usenet-

says...
Hi. I just bought my new house (2 story semi-detached in North West

London)
and I want to wire it up so that i'll be able to easily network 3-4
computers around the house when we move in. from my rudementary

computing
knowledge, i'm guessing i just need to run a bunch of cat5 cables

between
the rooms, each ending with an RJ45 plug.


At least one double wallplate (that's a socket, not a plug) in each
room, maybe a couple on opposite walls.


double wallplate? two sockets?

And it's a good idea to run
more cables than you need at the moment and just leave them unterminated
in the wall - cable is cheap.


k. thanks.


The thing is, i will want the
fastest network available and will want to upgrade this to a faster

network
in years to come.

Assuming that for now i will using gigabit ethanet, will cat5 suffice?


No point using less than Cat6. I'm not sure you can even easily find
Cat5 anymore - everything has been Cat5e for a while now.


Anything more future proof than Cat6? How much is Cat6 a metre? (yard?
foot?)

What do I look out for in Cat6? They're all the same? What do I look out for
in particular?


Is there any point in installing fibre-optic (if so, how does gigabit
ethanet interface with fibre-optic)?


Probably a bit expensive to install fibre unless you know you're going
to use it.


So when is FO used?


Does it make a differance where my server or router will be or if i'll

have
a peer-to-peer networking?


Structured cabling runs everything to a central point (like the cupboard
under the stairs) and uses patch panels to connect cables together as
needed.


Does that mean all cables from both upstairs and downstairs, even from
adjoining rooms, go to one point?
I can be pretty certain that the server will be downstairs in the main room
and all other machines upstairs and downstairs will be clients of it.


ps-the electrician doing up the house doesn't have much knowledge of
networking, so will be relying on my instructions

Make sure your instructions are good then :-) Have a look at some
websites (I just Googled these - they look like the right sort of thing
but I only glanced at them, some may be a bit dated:

http://www.broadbandhomecentral.com/structured.html
http://www.home-automation-solutions...tured-cabling-
wiring.shtml
http://www.quantometrix.com/wiring.htm
http://www.combsnet.com/cable/
)

If you're still unsure of design and installation requirements after
reading a bit it might be better to use a specialised contractor who
offers a design and install service. I'd be a bit dubious of using a
sparky who wasn't familiar with the specific requirements of network
installation, and didn't have the right test equipment - there's not
much point saving money at this stage if you find that the installation
doesn't perform to spec or meet your requirements a couple of years down
the line.


--
thanks a lot,
Ash.


  #6  
Old September 9th 04, 07:05 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Ashirus
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8
Default wiring and future-proofing my new home

And what's this I'm now learning about Cat7?

Will all this cabling be out of date in a few years much as Cat6 is for real
gigabit now?

Is Fibre-obtic futureproof?

"Ashirus"
usenet-replyATashirusnwNO_SPAM.freeserve.co.ukDeleteFollo
wrote in message ...
Hi. I just bought my new house (2 story semi-detached in North West

London)
and I want to wire it up so that i'll be able to easily network 3-4
computers around the house when we move in. from my rudementary computing
knowledge, i'm guessing i just need to run a bunch of cat5 cables between
the rooms, each ending with an RJ45 plug. The thing is, i will want the
fastest network available and will want to upgrade this to a faster

network
in years to come.

Assuming that for now i will using gigabit ethanet, will cat5 suffice?

Is there any point in installing fibre-optic (if so, how does gigabit
ethanet interface with fibre-optic)?

Does it make a differance where my server or router will be or if i'll

have
a peer-to-peer networking?

ps-the electrician doing up the house doesn't have much knowledge of
networking, so will be relying on my instructions

THANKS
ASHIRUS



--
ta,
ash.


  #7  
Old September 9th 04, 08:10 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Rob Morley
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,379
Default wiring and future-proofing my new home

In article , "Ashirus" usenet-

says...
"Rob Morley" wrote in message
t...
In article , "Ashirus" usenet-

says...

snip
At least one double wallplate (that's a socket, not a plug) in each
room, maybe a couple on opposite walls.


double wallplate? two sockets?


At least - if you don't use it for data you can use it for a 'phone or
something.
snip

Anything more future proof than Cat6?


Cat7? I don't think that's an official standard yet though, although
some suppliers are selling stuff they call Cat7.

How much is Cat6 a metre? (yard? foot?)


20p/metre when you buy a 305m roll - if you look hard enough you can
find it for half that or less. The actual cost of cable is probably the
smallest part of your budget, hence the advice to run two even if you
think you'll only need one.

What do I look out for in Cat6? They're all the same? What do I look out for
in particular?


It should all be pretty much the same - that's what standards are for
:-)

Is there any point in installing fibre-optic (if so, how does gigabit
ethanet interface with fibre-optic)?


Probably a bit expensive to install fibre unless you know you're going
to use it.


So when is FO used?


Usually industrial server applications or between buildings.

Does it make a differance where my server or router will be or if i'll

have
a peer-to-peer networking?


Structured cabling runs everything to a central point (like the cupboard
under the stairs) and uses patch panels to connect cables together as
needed.


Does that mean all cables from both upstairs and downstairs, even from
adjoining rooms, go to one point?


Yes - that generally offers maximum flexibility, as you can just patch
any cables together that you want connecting. Normally you'd have your
master phone socket, broadband connection and network switch in the
wiring closet - everything else radiates from there.

I can be pretty certain that the server will be downstairs in the main room
and all other machines upstairs and downstairs will be clients of it.


If you cable for that it will still be flexible, but do you really want
switches, routers and patch panels in the living room? In fact do you
really want a server in your living room? Lots of fast storage is going
to be quite noisy, and probably better tucked away somewhere it doesn't
matter - also probably better from a security POV. I'd rather have a
small entertainment system in the living room, and a server in the
cupboard or loft.
  #8  
Old September 9th 04, 11:37 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Zontag
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 13
Default wiring and future-proofing my new home

Ashirus wrote:

Hi. I just bought my new house (2 story semi-detached in North West London)
and I want to wire it up so that i'll be able to easily network 3-4
computers around the house when we move in. from my rudementary computing
knowledge, i'm guessing i just need to run a bunch of cat5 cables between
the rooms, each ending with an RJ45 plug. The thing is, i will want the
fastest network available and will want to upgrade this to a faster network
in years to come.

Assuming that for now i will using gigabit ethanet, will cat5 suffice?

Is there any point in installing fibre-optic (if so, how does gigabit
ethanet interface with fibre-optic)?

Does it make a differance where my server or router will be or if i'll have
a peer-to-peer networking?

ps-the electrician doing up the house doesn't have much knowledge of
networking, so will be relying on my instructions

THANKS
ASHIRUS



Even standard 100mbs 100baseT over cat5e will give more than enough
bandwidth for any kind streaming multimedia for years to come and ADSL
internet connections although they will get faster than they are
currently are limited by the technology used to less than a tenth of
that. At the present using cat 6 to full potential bandwidth capacity
is just a bit too iffy although there is nothing to stop you installing
cat 6 wiring and running it at 100mbs. Fibre optics presents to many
problems.

Remember to install the wiring so it can be easily upgraded.
From experience of wiring up many domestic style buildings I would
sugest wiring upstairs rooms down from the loft space. Built in
wardrobes and cupboards can be very usefull for concealling cables and
the patch panel. Getting the wirng neatly from ground to 1st floor can
present problems unless the design of the house makes it easy for you it
might be easier/neater to drop it down the outside of the building.

Use wall sockets to termminate the wiring use a proper metal blade
"punchdown tool" to make the connections. For rj45 wall sockets "Krone"
is regarded as the best manufacturer.
  #9  
Old September 10th 04, 12:39 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
THe NuTTeR
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 64
Default wiring and future-proofing my new home

Basically, the only advice I have is to install as many sockets
(normally double, data+phone for example) as you can. In as many rooms
as you can.
Someone suggested running cables outside. According to the specs, this
is a no-no, however I know of 2 installs where it works fine. Best keep
it inside if you can tho.
Run all cables to a central point. Get the master phone socket installed
in the same place and get a set (6 or 8, always do more than you need)
patch panel phone points to connect to outlets around the home.
Put a double gang backbox (4 sockets) behind where you think the TV will
go (games console, media streaming from network storage, TiVo type
devices that use broadband to get channel listings, etc)
Basically, work out what you think you will use, and then multiply by 4!
Its always easier and cheaper to put much more in than you think you
need in the first place than to try and add more later. If you can, run
the cables in channeling such that the existing cable can be used as a
draw string for any cabling you have future need to replace it with.
Also, it may be a thought to run coax (TV, video, satellite) with or
near the data cabling to allow for extra functionality (TV tuner cards
maybe?) If you do, I would reccomend using satellite style 'F'
connectors (screw connection) and running an (or the main) aerial point
to the central hub, and then putting a multi port amplifier in to split
the signal.
You should be able to get everything you need from
www.ardelectronics.com, although the website is hard work, if you have
time, get the printed catalogue and work out what you need.
Oh, and when you get the modular sockets, stay away from keystone, the
small size makes them hard work, get the full size stuff.
Hope some of this has been useful
G


"Ashirus"
usenet-replyATashirusnwNO_SPAM.freeserve.co.ukDeleteFollo
wrote in message ...
Hi. I just bought my new house (2 story semi-detached in North West
London)

snip question


  #10  
Old September 10th 04, 01:03 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
colin.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6
Default wiring and future-proofing my new home


"Ashirus"
usenet-replyATashirusnwNO_SPAM.freeserve.co.ukDeleteFollo
wrote in message ...

| sigh didn't I ask about cabling a house that's being refurbished? you
| don't *have* to reply just because you won a keyboard!

And you don't have to act like a dick just because you have one. It will
not encourage people to help you out. It didn't encourage me, heh.


 




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