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uk.comp.home-networking (UK home networking) (uk.comp.home-networking) Discussion of all aspects of computer networking in the home, regardless of the platforms, software, topologies and protocols used. Examples of topics include recommendations for hardware or suppliers (e.g. NICs and cabling), protocols, servers, and specific network software. Advertising is not allowed.

planning a home network



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 14th 04, 02:34 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Bernard Peek
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 202
Default planning a home network

In message , Ashirus
usenet-replyATashirusnwNO_SPAM.freeserve.co.ukDeleteFollo
m writes
hi. totally refurbishing my house and the electrician needs to rewire it, so
going to install proper network cabling to a lot of the rooms.

Thing is, I have no real office or work area in the house so the central
patch panel and router can either be installed below the stairs in a small
cupboard, where there's no space for a computer or in the main dining room,
where we'd hide it in a larger cupboard so there would be space for a
server/central computer itself, but this maybe more inconvenient. We could
also install the router and patchpanel in an upstairs spare bedroom where
there is plenty of space, but I'm worried that the telephone extension up
there won't be the central one and therefore I wouldn't have the best
internet access setup. I need a good internet setup as I may run a full
public web-server from my house and therefore run a leased line to my house.


If you use a separate leased-line you can have it terminated anywhere
you want. In the short term you may prefer an ADSL link. That requires
the router to be reasonably close to a telephone extension, I don't
believe it has to be the master socket.


So...

What do I do? Does it matter if the patchpanel and router are just near any
old telephone extension, or should they be on the master plug (if there is
such a thing)?

Also, how useful is it to have the central computer/server next to the
router? Or can it be plugged into any room in the house at the end of the
installed RJ-45s a good 50 meters from the router?


The machines can be pretty much anywhere, 50m is no problem for a CAT5
cable. I think it's unlikely that you would need gigabit ethernet so you
probably don't need CAT6 cables.



--
Bernard Peek
London, UK. DBA, Manager, Trainer & Author. Will work for money.

  #2  
Old September 14th 04, 02:53 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Conor
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 579
Default planning a home network

In article , Ashirus says...

So...

What do I do? Does it matter if the patchpanel and router are just near any
old telephone extension, or should they be on the master plug (if there is
such a thing)?

Also, how useful is it to have the central computer/server next to the
router? Or can it be plugged into any room in the house at the end of the
installed RJ-45s a good 50 meters from the router?

Any other tips?


You can put the router and patch panel anywhere. My router is sat on a
30 metre budget home extension kit and works fine with low noise, good
speed and low latency in games BUT you need to get the copper wire
extension as alot of them are aluminium wire which isn't as good.

As for the location of the server...doesn't matter. Thats the whole
point of networking, to allow you to put the kit anywhere.

If it was my house?

Router/pach panel under the stairs. Buy a low spec PC (such as old
Compaq P2/P3) in a small case with around 512MB RAM but a large HDD
and stick it under the stairs as a fileserver. Stick RealVNC on it so
you don't need to use a mouse/keyboard/monitor but can access it and
use it as if you were sat at the keyboard instead from other computers
on the LAN.

--
Conor

Opinions personal, facts suspect.
  #3  
Old September 14th 04, 02:57 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Michael Salem
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 79
Default planning a home network

Ashirus wrote about a home network.

Others have commented on the main points.

Personally I don't see the need for a patch panel or wall sockets in a
small network which isn't going to be reconfigured much. Just run long
flyleads which meet the required specification from workstations to the
switch/hub. You can use either solid or stranded cable; stranded is
probably better if any flexing is likely.

In fact, a network like this is potentially more reliable than with a
patch panel and wall sockets, as you are eliminating two cable joins per
work position.

If you change your mind, you can fit patch panel and wall sockets later
to the existing cables.

The switch can be located anywhere (unless it's also the ADSL modem); it
doesn't have to be near any machine.

HTH,
--
Michael Salem
  #4  
Old September 14th 04, 03:13 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Ashirus
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8
Default planning a home network

hi. totally refurbishing my house and the electrician needs to rewire it, so
going to install proper network cabling to a lot of the rooms.

Thing is, I have no real office or work area in the house so the central
patch panel and router can either be installed below the stairs in a small
cupboard, where there's no space for a computer or in the main dining room,
where we'd hide it in a larger cupboard so there would be space for a
server/central computer itself, but this maybe more inconvenient. We could
also install the router and patchpanel in an upstairs spare bedroom where
there is plenty of space, but I'm worried that the telephone extension up
there won't be the central one and therefore I wouldn't have the best
internet access setup. I need a good internet setup as I may run a full
public web-server from my house and therefore run a leased line to my house.

So...

What do I do? Does it matter if the patchpanel and router are just near any
old telephone extension, or should they be on the master plug (if there is
such a thing)?

Also, how useful is it to have the central computer/server next to the
router? Or can it be plugged into any room in the house at the end of the
installed RJ-45s a good 50 meters from the router?

Any other tips?

(Using Cat5e rather than Cat6 though I'm planning a gigabit network because
of the complicated installation and handling requirments as my electrician
isn't that network experienced, and because everyone tells me it's not yet
possible to get fully-standard-compatible cat6 cables, see post below).

--
Thanks very much,
Ashirus


  #5  
Old September 14th 04, 07:44 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Dr Zoidberg
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 43
Default planning a home network

Michael Salem wrote:
Ashirus wrote about a home network.

Others have commented on the main points.

Personally I don't see the need for a patch panel or wall sockets in a
small network which isn't going to be reconfigured much. Just run long
flyleads which meet the required specification from workstations to
the switch/hub. You can use either solid or stranded cable; stranded
is probably better if any flexing is likely.


Apart from it looks a mess , so if you are rewiring a house you would be mad
not to get all the cables hidden away.

In fact, a network like this is potentially more reliable than with a
patch panel and wall sockets, as you are eliminating two cable joins
per work position.


Get real. How many professional networks have flyleads trailed around all
over the place?
CAT5 is not going to stop working just cause it has a couple of patch
panels.

If you change your mind, you can fit patch panel and wall sockets
later to the existing cables.


By which time you have surface mounted cables and panels.
An even bigger mess.
--
Alex

"We are now up against live, hostile targets"

"So, if Little Red Riding Hood should show up with a bazooka and a bad
attitude, I expect you to chin the bitch! "

www.drzoidberg.co.uk
www.ebayfaq.co.uk


  #6  
Old September 14th 04, 08:17 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
logized
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 19
Default planning a home network


"Ashirus"
usenet-replyATashirusnwNO_SPAM.freeserve.co.ukDeleteFollo
wrote in message ...
hi. totally refurbishing my house and the electrician needs to rewire it,

so
going to install proper network cabling to a lot of the rooms.

Thing is, I have no real office or work area in the house so the central
patch panel and router can either be installed below the stairs in a small
cupboard, where there's no space for a computer or in the main dining

room,
where we'd hide it in a larger cupboard so there would be space for a
server/central computer itself, but this maybe more inconvenient. We could
also install the router and patchpanel in an upstairs spare bedroom where
there is plenty of space, but I'm worried that the telephone extension up
there won't be the central one and therefore I wouldn't have the best
internet access setup. I need a good internet setup as I may run a full
public web-server from my house and therefore run a leased line to my

house.

So...

What do I do? Does it matter if the patchpanel and router are just near

any
old telephone extension, or should they be on the master plug (if there is
such a thing)?

Also, how useful is it to have the central computer/server next to the
router? Or can it be plugged into any room in the house at the end of the
installed RJ-45s a good 50 meters from the router?

Any other tips?

(Using Cat5e rather than Cat6 though I'm planning a gigabit network

because
of the complicated installation and handling requirments as my electrician
isn't that network experienced, and because everyone tells me it's not yet
possible to get fully-standard-compatible cat6 cables, see post below).

--
Thanks very much,
Ashirus


I would suggest putting the patch panel below the stairs together with say
an 8 or 16 port switch (if this is enough for the initial network).
You can put the ADSL modem/router there too or anywhere that has a network
and phone connection as long as it is not an extension that is connected via
an ADSL phone filter.
You can site the server anywhere that has some ventilation and where the fan
and drive noise would not be a problem.
When planning the cabling, it is a good idea to try to consider all things
that may need a network connection now or in the future eg. network
connected printers, game consoles or near TVs or even in the kitchen, where
appliances may in future be network connected (I think there are already
some washing machines and fridges available with network connections.)

Dave


  #7  
Old September 15th 04, 09:53 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Zontag
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 13
Default planning a home network

If you are close to your exchange and the BT lines are of good quality
an ADSL modem/router will work quite happily on an extension phone line
provided the extenstion is connected before the adsl filter.
However if you are some distance from the exchange and want a fast
broadband service you should try and reduce extension losses to a
minimum ; the best way to install (for reduction in losses ) is to get
a fillter which is built into the face plate of the main phone point,
the connection can then be taken by cat5 cable to the router.
for info see http://www.adslguide.org.uk/newsarchive.asp?item=1364


To keep your network wiring tidy various colours and lengths of patch
leads can be found down to about 1 foot long but remember where a lead
goes directly from one device to another which are very close together
as for example connectiong a hub to a server that a minimum length of
cable is required --- I never use cables less than 1 metre long in this
situation.


If you shop around you should be able to find patch cables for 75p
upwards depending on length.


  #8  
Old September 16th 04, 11:51 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
sam
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3
Default planning a home network

have a look at this page very useful:and a superb introduction to home
networking
http://www.modfatha.com/structured_network_open.html


im currently trying to souce an enclosure the enclosure in the review is
from the usa and bought from http://www.hometech.com/

it looks like buying from the usa might be cheaper than the uk currently,
for serious home network and also av distribution

S







"Zontag" wrote in message
...
If you are close to your exchange and the BT lines are of good quality an
ADSL modem/router will work quite happily on an extension phone line
provided the extenstion is connected before the adsl filter.
However if you are some distance from the exchange and want a fast
broadband service you should try and reduce extension losses to a minimum
; the best way to install (for reduction in losses ) is to get a fillter
which is built into the face plate of the main phone point, the
connection can then be taken by cat5 cable to the router.
for info see http://www.adslguide.org.uk/newsarchive.asp?item=1364


To keep your network wiring tidy various colours and lengths of patch
leads can be found down to about 1 foot long but remember where a lead
goes directly from one device to another which are very close together as
for example connectiong a hub to a server that a minimum length of cable
is required --- I never use cables less than 1 metre long in this
situation.


If you shop around you should be able to find patch cables for 75p upwards
depending on length.




  #9  
Old September 17th 04, 12:22 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
THe NuTTeR
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 64
Default planning a home network

snip
actually, they are less than that from ARD.... but there is a delivery
charge, so you'd need to buy quite a lot. But if bought with all the
cable for in the walls, and the boxes and wall plates, would be a good
way to get them. Never had a problem with an ARD cable.

If you shop around you should be able to find patch cables for 75p
upwards depending on length.




  #10  
Old September 17th 04, 12:58 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
logized
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 19
Default planning a home network


"sam" wrote in message
...
have a look at this page very useful:and a superb introduction to home
networking
http://www.modfatha.com/structured_network_open.html


im currently trying to souce an enclosure the enclosure in the review is
from the usa and bought from http://www.hometech.com/

it looks like buying from the usa might be cheaper than the uk currently,
for serious home network and also av distribution

S

If you are putting the enclosure somewhere where appearance is not
important - such as in a garage, why not just build an enclosure from mdf?-
it would only cost a few pounds and you could make it to suite your
requirements.

Dave


 




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