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uk.comp.home-networking (UK home networking) (uk.comp.home-networking) Discussion of all aspects of computer networking in the home, regardless of the platforms, software, topologies and protocols used. Examples of topics include recommendations for hardware or suppliers (e.g. NICs and cabling), protocols, servers, and specific network software. Advertising is not allowed.

Wireless bridging.



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 15th 04, 01:49 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Sean Breen
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6
Default Wireless bridging.

I have a desktop PC running Windows XP connected to BT Broadband ADSL via
wired port 1 on a BT Voyager 2100 wireless modem/router.

I use the wireless side to allow my laptop to connect from anywhere in the
house.

My problem is that I need to allow a standalone PC in a remote outhouse to
connect also - but it is too far away (100m) to get the wireless signal.

How do I extend the wireless to that remote building?

Can I position a repeater or bridge between the buildings?

If so, what do I need that will be compatible with the BT Voyager 2100?

Your help is greatly appreciated.
--
Sean Breen


  #2  
Old September 15th 04, 02:01 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
mike
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 48
Default Wireless bridging.

yes you can buy repeaters, though they do slow the link down somewhat.
plus ofcourse you will have to power the beasty as well
if you are going to be running low volts or even mains partway there to
power a repeater then why not run a long cat5 cable?

there are small very good beams you can buy to put on your router to extend
it's range or you might get away with using one of the many 'reflectors'
that you can attach to the routers existing aerial.
i built one of these and put in on my lynksys router and can get a 50%
signal at about 120ft.

then i moved to a 14 element beam.

have a look on the net for DIY reflectors & aerials, there are some good
designs that can easily be built.

mike

"Sean Breen" wrote in message
...
I have a desktop PC running Windows XP connected to BT Broadband ADSL via
wired port 1 on a BT Voyager 2100 wireless modem/router.

I use the wireless side to allow my laptop to connect from anywhere in the
house.

My problem is that I need to allow a standalone PC in a remote outhouse to
connect also - but it is too far away (100m) to get the wireless signal.

How do I extend the wireless to that remote building?

Can I position a repeater or bridge between the buildings?

If so, what do I need that will be compatible with the BT Voyager 2100?

Your help is greatly appreciated.
--
Sean Breen




---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.760 / Virus Database: 509 - Release Date: 11/09/2004


  #3  
Old September 15th 04, 12:41 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Sean Breen
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6
Default Wireless bridging.


"mike" wrote in message
...
yes you can buy repeaters, though they do slow the link down somewhat.
plus ofcourse you will have to power the beasty as well
if you are going to be running low volts or even mains partway there to
power a repeater then why not run a long cat5 cable?

there are small very good beams you can buy to put on your router to

extend
it's range or you might get away with using one of the many 'reflectors'
mike


Mike,

Thanks for that.

The problem with cat5 cabling is I have a public road running between the
outhouse & my house - so a cable would not be appropriate.

The reflector idea is OK but I would be worried I would create blank spots
in the house & loose connectivity for the roaming laptop.

There is no problem getting power to a repeater/bridge at the half way
point - I could even run a cat5 cable to the bridge from the house & just
have the wireless part from the bridge to the outhouse across the public
road. That would be my preferred solution.

I just need to have some advice on exactly what I need to buy that will do
the job with the BT Voyager 2100.

Many thanks.

Seán.


  #4  
Old September 15th 04, 06:28 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
None
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 15
Default Wireless bridging.

the DLink DWL-2100AP does bridge-bridge - where as you can extend the
range for your wireless network

On Wed, 15 Sep 2004 00:49:51 +0000 (UTC), "Sean Breen"
wrote:

I have a desktop PC running Windows XP connected to BT Broadband ADSL via
wired port 1 on a BT Voyager 2100 wireless modem/router.

I use the wireless side to allow my laptop to connect from anywhere in the
house.

My problem is that I need to allow a standalone PC in a remote outhouse to
connect also - but it is too far away (100m) to get the wireless signal.

How do I extend the wireless to that remote building?

Can I position a repeater or bridge between the buildings?

If so, what do I need that will be compatible with the BT Voyager 2100?

Your help is greatly appreciated.


  #5  
Old September 15th 04, 06:54 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
mike
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 48
Default Wireless bridging.

ok well i'm lucky my router has two aerials ports.
one is the beam
the other is the in-house rubber duck with reflector.
works a treat

mike

"Sean Breen" wrote in message
...

"mike" wrote in message
...
yes you can buy repeaters, though they do slow the link down somewhat.
plus ofcourse you will have to power the beasty as well
if you are going to be running low volts or even mains partway there to
power a repeater then why not run a long cat5 cable?

there are small very good beams you can buy to put on your router to

extend
it's range or you might get away with using one of the many 'reflectors'
mike


Mike,

Thanks for that.

The problem with cat5 cabling is I have a public road running between the
outhouse & my house - so a cable would not be appropriate.

The reflector idea is OK but I would be worried I would create blank spots
in the house & loose connectivity for the roaming laptop.

There is no problem getting power to a repeater/bridge at the half way
point - I could even run a cat5 cable to the bridge from the house & just
have the wireless part from the bridge to the outhouse across the public
road. That would be my preferred solution.

I just need to have some advice on exactly what I need to buy that will do
the job with the BT Voyager 2100.

Many thanks.

Seán.




---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.760 / Virus Database: 509 - Release Date: 10/09/2004


  #6  
Old September 17th 04, 05:10 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Sean Breen
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6
Default Wireless bridging.

Can you, or someone, be more specific as to how I implement this solution.

Do I run a cable from one of the Voyager wired ports to the DLink?

Will the DLink then route the Broadband connection to the remote wireless
enabled PC in the outhouse?

Sorry if these sound like silly or basic questions - but it's all new to
me - I have no problem with the basic set-up - it's bridging the wireless
coverage that is baffling me and I don't want to spend loadsa money on some
kit & then find, either it doesn't work as expected or there was a simpler &
cheaper solution.

Many thanks,

Seán.

----- Original Message -----
From: "None"
Newsgroups: uk.comp.home-networking
Sent: Wednesday, September 15, 2004 6:28 PM
Subject: Wireless bridging.


the DLink DWL-2100AP does bridge-bridge - where as you can extend the
range for your wireless network

On Wed, 15 Sep 2004 00:49:51 +0000 (UTC), "Sean Breen"
wrote:

I have a desktop PC running Windows XP connected to BT Broadband ADSL via
wired port 1 on a BT Voyager 2100 wireless modem/router.

I use the wireless side to allow my laptop to connect from anywhere in

the
house.

My problem is that I need to allow a standalone PC in a remote outhouse

to
connect also - but it is too far away (100m) to get the wireless signal.

How do I extend the wireless to that remote building?

Can I position a repeater or bridge between the buildings?

If so, what do I need that will be compatible with the BT Voyager 2100?

Your help is greatly appreciated.





 




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