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uk.comp.home-networking (UK home networking) (uk.comp.home-networking) Discussion of all aspects of computer networking in the home, regardless of the platforms, software, topologies and protocols used. Examples of topics include recommendations for hardware or suppliers (e.g. NICs and cabling), protocols, servers, and specific network software. Advertising is not allowed.

Using VPN



 
 
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  #1  
Old December 19th 04, 10:13 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Trevor Appleton
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 43
Default Using VPN

Whilst working online the other day connected to a server 150mls away,
something printed out on my printer, and it was someone printing from the
distant office.

It made me think, how do I know they can't access my PC?

Or how do I ensure they don't?


  #2  
Old December 19th 04, 12:13 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Michael Salem
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 79
Default Using VPN

Trevor Appleton wrote:

Whilst working online the other day connected to a server 150mls away,
something printed out on my printer, and it was someone printing from the
distant office.

It made me think, how do I know they can't access my PC?

Or how do I ensure they don't?


Using a VPN is exactly like connecting the equipment to the same
network. So the answer to your question is the same as to "how do I
prevent people having access to my equipment if I plug it into their
network". Details depend upon the operating system you are using, but
will involve passwords and access control.

HTH,
--
Michael Salem
  #3  
Old December 19th 04, 01:09 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Geoff Lane
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 221
Default Using VPN

On Sun, 19 Dec 2004 10:13:47 -0000, "Trevor Appleton"
wrote:

Whilst working online the other day connected to a server 150mls away,
something printed out on my printer, and it was someone printing from the
distant office.

It made me think, how do I know they can't access my PC?

Or how do I ensure they don't?


A software firewall like ZoneAlarm should advise you of any incoming
attempts.

A hardware firewall (Router) is normally configurable to stop any
uninvited inbound connections.

Was your printer connected to your computer or a 'print server'?

Geoff Lane


  #4  
Old December 19th 04, 06:04 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Trevor Appleton
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 43
Default Using VPN


"Geoff Lane" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 19 Dec 2004 10:13:47 -0000, "Trevor Appleton"
wrote:

Whilst working online the other day connected to a server 150mls away,
something printed out on my printer, and it was someone printing from the
distant office.

It made me think, how do I know they can't access my PC?

Or how do I ensure they don't?


A software firewall like ZoneAlarm should advise you of any incoming
attempts.

A hardware firewall (Router) is normally configurable to stop any
uninvited inbound connections.

Was your printer connected to your computer or a 'print server'?

Geoff Lane



I am going through a router and have only the XP firewall, though have
Norton Internet Security ordered. I don't understand how a router acts as a
firewall.

.. The printer is connected to my computer


  #5  
Old December 19th 04, 07:28 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Rob Morley
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,379
Default Using VPN

In article , "Trevor
Appleton" says...

"Geoff Lane" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 19 Dec 2004 10:13:47 -0000, "Trevor Appleton"
wrote:

Whilst working online the other day connected to a server 150mls away,
something printed out on my printer, and it was someone printing from the
distant office.

It made me think, how do I know they can't access my PC?

Or how do I ensure they don't?


A software firewall like ZoneAlarm should advise you of any incoming
attempts.

A hardware firewall (Router) is normally configurable to stop any
uninvited inbound connections.

Was your printer connected to your computer or a 'print server'?


I am going through a router and have only the XP firewall, though have
Norton Internet Security ordered. I don't understand how a router acts as a
firewall.

Network Address Translation - something on your LAN connects out via the
router, the router receives a response and directs it back to the
originating machine because it keeps track of the transaction. If
something tries to connect to your public IP address it connects to the
router, which won't do very much because it's not part of a transaction
it knows about so there's nowhere to forward it[1]. Norton is crap by
the way.

[1] Unless you've set up virtual servers, in which case connection to an
appropriate port on the router is forwarded to the LAN address that is
set up to provide that service.
  #6  
Old December 20th 04, 01:52 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Michael Salem
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 79
Default Using VPN

I don't understand how a router acts as a
firewall.

Network Address Translation - something on your LAN connects out via the
router, the router receives a response and directs it back to the
originating machine because it keeps track of the transaction. If
something tries to connect to your public IP address it connects to the
router, which won't do very much because it's not part of a transaction
it knows about so there's nowhere to forward it[1]. Norton is crap by
the way.


In addition, better routers have detailed firewall facilities which let
you open and forward ports, set up a DMZ, etc. If interested, have a
look around the Web.

But all this talk about firewalls is irrelevant as you say you've set up
a VPN, which (if working properly) effectively connects your machine to
the remote network through any firewalls. Have a look at a previous post
of mine. If using Microsoft Windows, make sure your printers and files
aren't shared, or at least set a password.

HTH,
--
Michael Salem
 




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