A Broadband and ADSL forum. BroadbanterBanter

Welcome to BroadbanterBanter.

You are currently viewing as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions and other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today.

Go Back   Home » BroadbanterBanter forum » Newsgroup Discussions » uk.comp.home-networking (UK home networking)
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

uk.comp.home-networking (UK home networking) (uk.comp.home-networking) Discussion of all aspects of computer networking in the home, regardless of the platforms, software, topologies and protocols used. Examples of topics include recommendations for hardware or suppliers (e.g. NICs and cabling), protocols, servers, and specific network software. Advertising is not allowed.

Network two houses together?



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old May 5th 05, 12:56 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
mark
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 20
Default Network two houses together?

I'm planning of moving over the other side of the street, (out of my mums)
but ideally would like to leave my server in the attic here. Is it legal for
me to have some ethernet cable going from roof top to roof top like
telephone cables? it's a very very quiet street...

or is it just not do-able?


  #2  
Old May 5th 05, 01:22 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Phil Thompson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,720
Default Network two houses together?

On Wed, 4 May 2005 23:56:49 +0100, "mark" wrote:

Is it legal for
me to have some ethernet cable going from roof top to roof top like
telephone cables?


almost certainly not, at least without permission. There are also
issues with potential voltage differences that usually put people off
electrically connecting different buildings.

802.11g wireless would work, directional antenna would increase
security as well as giving a better signal.

Phil
--
spamcop.net address commissioned 18/06/04
Come on down !
  #3  
Old May 5th 05, 09:23 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
nog
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10
Default Network two houses together?

On Thu, 05 May 2005 00:22:42 +0100, Phil Thompson wrote:

almost certainly not, at least without permission. There are also
issues with potential voltage differences that usually put people off
electrically connecting different buildings.


It's more of an issue that the buildings may be fed by different phases.
Tangling with the resulting current could put you off life.
  #4  
Old May 5th 05, 09:23 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Gordon
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 64
Default Network two houses together?

nog wrote:
On Thu, 05 May 2005 00:22:42 +0100, Phil Thompson wrote:


almost certainly not, at least without permission. There are also
issues with potential voltage differences that usually put people off
electrically connecting different buildings.



It's more of an issue that the buildings may be fed by different phases.
Tangling with the resulting current could put you off life.


What's electricity got to do with running *ethernet* cable over the
road......the op's not planning to run the power cable across the
street...and what has "different phases" got to do with anything?
  #5  
Old May 5th 05, 09:47 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Phil Thompson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,720
Default Network two houses together?

On Thu, 05 May 2005 08:23:58 +0100, Gordon
wrote:

What's electricity got to do with running *ethernet* cable over the
road......the op's not planning to run the power cable across the
street...and what has "different phases" got to do with anything?


the earthing of the two ends may not be at the same potential ,
generating current flow down the network that it isn't designed for.

The phase difference means that there can be 415V difference between
the lives in two houses, so a fault condition is potentially much
worse than if two lives on the same phase became connected where there
is no voltage difference, or the 230V from one phase to earth.

Its a safety thing. People use fibre, optical isolators and the like
in these situations. Just in case a signal wire contacts a live wire.

Phil
--
spamcop.net address commissioned 18/06/04
Come on down !
  #6  
Old May 5th 05, 10:01 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Gordon
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 64
Default Network two houses together?

Phil Thompson wrote:
On Thu, 05 May 2005 08:23:58 +0100, Gordon
wrote:


What's electricity got to do with running *ethernet* cable over the
road......the op's not planning to run the power cable across the
street...and what has "different phases" got to do with anything?



the earthing of the two ends may not be at the same potential ,
generating current flow down the network that it isn't designed for.

The phase difference means that there can be 415V difference between
the lives in two houses,


Can't see how an ethernet cable would join two different live feeds......



or the 230V from one phase to earth.


Phase to Neutral actually, if you connect phase to earth you get
infinite current!


Its a safety thing. People use fibre, optical isolators and the like
in these situations. Just in case a signal wire contacts a live wire.

Phil


  #7  
Old May 5th 05, 10:26 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Phil Thompson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,720
Default Network two houses together?

On Thu, 05 May 2005 09:01:04 +0100, Gordon
wrote:

Can't see how an ethernet cable would join two different live feeds......


fault condition, something cuts through adjacent data and mains
cables, fire in PC, prat sends mains down spare cores of Cat5 to power
wireless access point. All low probabiltiy stuff.

or the 230V from one phase to earth.


Phase to Neutral actually, if you connect phase to earth you get
infinite current!


not infinite, and I was talking voltage anway. You will also get a
very large current if you connect two phases together.

as the neutral is earther phase to neutral is effectively the same as
phase to earth.


Phil
--
spamcop.net address commissioned 18/06/04
Come on down !
  #8  
Old May 5th 05, 03:05 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Fred
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 42
Default Network two houses together?


"Phil Thompson" wrote in message
...
On Thu, 05 May 2005 08:23:58 +0100, Gordon
wrote:

What's electricity got to do with running *ethernet* cable over the
road......the op's not planning to run the power cable across the
street...and what has "different phases" got to do with anything?


the earthing of the two ends may not be at the same potential ,
generating current flow down the network that it isn't designed for.

The phase difference means that there can be 415V difference between
the lives in two houses, so a fault condition is potentially much
worse than if two lives on the same phase became connected where there
is no voltage difference, or the 230V from one phase to earth.

Its a safety thing. People use fibre, optical isolators and the like
in these situations. Just in case a signal wire contacts a live wire.

Phil
--


All ethernet cards etc have magnetics to isolate the cable from the card.
Therefore there shouldn't be any current even if the earths are just a few
volts different. In real life they may be a volt or so different though
somewhat higher during a fault condition depending on the earth system used.

I don't see any need to put mains on such a cable.

You've now got me thinking. Your standard house power meter measures
voltage and "in phase" current to work out power. Drawing power from two
phases may be a way of reducing your power bill since, for a resistive load,
the "in phase" power would likely to be lower than indicated by both
consumer meters. I wonder. How much can a 415V to 240V transformer cost?



  #9  
Old May 5th 05, 03:28 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Paul D.Smith
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 287
Default Network two houses together?

You've now got me thinking. Your standard house power meter measures
voltage and "in phase" current to work out power. Drawing power from two
phases may be a way of reducing your power bill since, for a resistive

load,
the "in phase" power would likely to be lower than indicated by both
consumer meters. I wonder. How much can a 415V to 240V transformer cost?


Used to be easier to put a large inductance into the circuit or strip wires
either side of the meter and use car jumper leads. Both work but are
equally naughty.

And talking of 3-phase, a few years ago, my father's welding company started
getting riduculously small electricity bills. The electricity company were
surprisingly disinterested but eventually came out and discovered that their
engineers had somehow wired up the fork-lift truck charger "backwards" so
during the day the meter ran like the clappers because of the welding kit,
and at night it ran almost as fast, but backwards, because of the forklift
charging. Bizarre but true!

Paul DS.


  #10  
Old May 5th 05, 08:05 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Dave Stanton
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 457
Default Network two houses together?


as the neutral is earth


Phil


Except in the real world neutral can/will have a potenial difference to
true earth.

Dave

--
For what we are about to balls up may common sense prevent us doing it
again
in the future!!
 




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
sharing BB between 2 houses me uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) 37 January 11th 06 09:29 PM
54g between houses nick uk.comp.home-networking (UK home networking) 4 February 12th 04 08:58 PM
How to install network cables for a home network Claude Matroy uk.comp.home-networking (UK home networking) 3 November 11th 03 12:24 PM
Home wireless network unavailable after connecting to work network - Windows XP Linksys Router Marc J. Osborne uk.comp.home-networking (UK home networking) 0 October 5th 03 04:48 PM
Problem using Netgear DG814s to connect a common LAN between two houses Ian Greenslade uk.comp.home-networking (UK home networking) 1 September 26th 03 03:51 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 02:50 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 2.4.0
Copyright 2004-2020 BroadbanterBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.