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uk.comp.home-networking (UK home networking) (uk.comp.home-networking) Discussion of all aspects of computer networking in the home, regardless of the platforms, software, topologies and protocols used. Examples of topics include recommendations for hardware or suppliers (e.g. NICs and cabling), protocols, servers, and specific network software. Advertising is not allowed.

Capacity of single cat5e cable



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 2nd 05, 04:29 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Clive
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Posts: 27
Default Capacity of single cat5e cable

I have 3 PC's upstairs, with my current 2mb cable modem also upstairs. The
PC's connect to the web via a 4 port switch.

I also have a file/print/email server (on 24/7) downstairs connect to the
same switch via a cat5e cable (solid core and fixed to walls, etc). Cable
length is about 20m max.

I'm switching to ADSL (4mb) and my phone socket is downstairs next to the
server, so I intend putting a ADSL router/switch downstairs. Will the cat5e
cable be able to cope with 3 PC's browsing and file transfer, etc. The
server is mainly used to store software and as a backup for the PC's (i.e.
on PC shutdown all 'my doc' is copied to server downstairs).

Or, should I move my switch downstairs and run another 3 cat5 cables
upstairs?

Thanks

Clive


  #2  
Old June 2nd 05, 04:37 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Andrew Oakley
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Posts: 37
Default Capacity of single cat5e cable

On Thu, 02 Jun 2005 14:29:16 GMT, "Clive" wrote:

server, so I intend putting a ADSL router/switch downstairs. Will the cat5e
cable be able to cope with 3 PC's browsing and file transfer, etc. The


Yes, provided the switches are both 100 megabit at each end, and that
they actually recognise each other as 100 megabit.

I've frequently found kit, marked as 100 megabit, autosensing
incorrectly then downgrading a socket to 10 megabit for no adequately
explained reason. Since I buy cheap kit, I'm guessing that better kit
doesn't do this.

--
Andrew Oakley andrew/atsymbol/aoakley/stop/com
  #3  
Old June 2nd 05, 04:51 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Phil Thompson
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Posts: 2,720
Default Capacity of single cat5e cable

On Thu, 02 Jun 2005 14:29:16 GMT, "Clive" wrote:

Will the cat5e
cable be able to cope with 3 PC's browsing and file transfer, etc.


there's potentially only one Cat5 going into the modem, if that gives
you a clue

Even 10M ethernet will eat an ADSL connection and you probably have
100M on the Cat5. Not an issue, IMO.

Phil
--
spamcop.net address commissioned 18/06/04
Come on down !
  #4  
Old June 2nd 05, 07:37 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Martin Underwood
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Posts: 251
Default Capacity of single cat5e cable

"Clive" wrote in message
. uk...
I have 3 PC's upstairs, with my current 2mb cable modem also upstairs. The
PC's connect to the web via a 4 port switch.

I also have a file/print/email server (on 24/7) downstairs connect to the
same switch via a cat5e cable (solid core and fixed to walls, etc). Cable
length is about 20m max.

I'm switching to ADSL (4mb) and my phone socket is downstairs next to the
server, so I intend putting a ADSL router/switch downstairs. Will the
cat5e cable be able to cope with 3 PC's browsing and file transfer, etc.
The server is mainly used to store software and as a backup for the PC's
(i.e. on PC shutdown all 'my doc' is copied to server downstairs).

Or, should I move my switch downstairs and run another 3 cat5 cables
upstairs?


I've only once come close to saturating a 100 Mbps LAN, and that was when I
was copying three separate directories from the same PC to three other PCs.
The network usage on the source PC then peaked at around 90%. Normally, even
between two modern-spec PCs with Win XP, a single directory copy only seems
to use about 30-40% flat-out.

The speed of the LAN is only an issue for PC-to-PC traffic. Any LAN (even 10
Mbps Ethernet or 11 Mbps Wireless-B) will be faster than a broadband
internet connection (almost certainly 2 Mbps max) so the broadband, rather
than the LAN, will be the rate-limiting step for internet traffic.


  #5  
Old June 2nd 05, 10:01 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Clint Sharp
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Posts: 550
Default Capacity of single cat5e cable

In message ,
Martin Underwood writes
"Clive" wrote in message
.uk...
I have 3 PC's upstairs, with my current 2mb cable modem also upstairs. The
PC's connect to the web via a 4 port switch.

I also have a file/print/email server (on 24/7) downstairs connect to the
same switch via a cat5e cable (solid core and fixed to walls, etc). Cable
length is about 20m max.

I'm switching to ADSL (4mb) and my phone socket is downstairs next to the
server, so I intend putting a ADSL router/switch downstairs. Will the
cat5e cable be able to cope with 3 PC's browsing and file transfer, etc.
The server is mainly used to store software and as a backup for the PC's
(i.e. on PC shutdown all 'my doc' is copied to server downstairs).

Or, should I move my switch downstairs and run another 3 cat5 cables
upstairs?


I've only once come close to saturating a 100 Mbps LAN, and that was when I
was copying three separate directories from the same PC to three other PCs.
The network usage on the source PC then peaked at around 90%. Normally, even
between two modern-spec PCs with Win XP, a single directory copy only seems
to use about 30-40% flat-out.

The speed of the LAN is only an issue for PC-to-PC traffic. Any LAN (even 10
Mbps Ethernet or 11 Mbps Wireless-B) will be faster than a broadband
internet connection (almost certainly 2 Mbps max) so the broadband, rather
than the LAN, will be the rate-limiting step for internet traffic.


What he said, should cope perfectly well, but why not use one of the
spare pairs in the cat5 as a telephone extension and place the router
upstairs if you're concerned? Saves running extra cables etc and your
network bandwidth between the workstations and Server isn't touched.
--
Clint Sharp
  #6  
Old June 3rd 05, 06:29 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
poster
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Posts: 1,542
Default Capacity of single cat5e cable

On 2 Jun 2005 18:37, "Martin Underwood" wrote:

Any LAN (even 10 Mbps Ethernet or 11 Mbps Wireless-B) will be faster than
a broadband internet connection (almost certainly 2 Mbps max) so the
broadband, rather than the LAN, will be the rate-limiting step for
internet traffic.


Given the 8000 kbps services from UK Online and Bulldog, being available to
some 4+ million people (probably the same 4 million for both services, in a
number of metro areas), I'd expect there to be some instances where a Wi-Fi
link which isn't performing at the full 11 Mpbs may slow things down when a
LAN is being used by several PCs (eg requesting traffic from several remote
servers, so total incoming traffic gets near the max ADSL speed possible).

--
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E-mail + files - 30 day free trial - http://web.vfm-deals.com/runbox/
USENET news service ? http://tinyurl.com/3rjw4 (plans from under US$5)
  #7  
Old June 7th 05, 11:13 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Dean Jarratt
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 18
Default Capacity of single cat5e cable

Clint Sharp wrote in
:

What he said, should cope perfectly well, but why not use one of the
spare pairs in the cat5 as a telephone extension and place the router
upstairs if you're concerned? Saves running extra cables etc and your
network bandwidth between the workstations and Server isn't touched.


Make sure you aren't running gigabit ethernet if your thinking of using the
spare pairs...because there are no spare pairs with gigabit.
  #8  
Old June 7th 05, 11:18 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Dean Jarratt
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 18
Default Capacity of single cat5e cable

"Clive" wrote in
. uk:

To answer the subject..."capacity of single CAT-5 cable". CAT-5 bandwidth
is currently pushing 10-Gigabit full duplex mainly thanks to some nifty bit
encoding. That's what about 1.25 Gigabytes per second in both directions.
Given that a high spec RAID arrays can probably push around 350 Megabytes
per second, that makes CAT-5 useful for some years to come.

 




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