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uk.comp.home-networking (UK home networking) (uk.comp.home-networking) Discussion of all aspects of computer networking in the home, regardless of the platforms, software, topologies and protocols used. Examples of topics include recommendations for hardware or suppliers (e.g. NICs and cabling), protocols, servers, and specific network software. Advertising is not allowed.

WAP and wi-fi



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 20th 05, 12:45 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
F9
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 62
Default WAP and wi-fi

Hi,

I'm new to the idea of wi-fi and not sure which way to go about the
changeover.

I have a 4 port router at present with two computers etherneted to it. I
want to add a laptop to roam with wi-fi.

The question I think is:

Do I need to buy a new /modem/router which can run both ethernet and wi-fi
(if one exists) or do I just buy a WAP and ethernet that into my existing
router.

Which is neater/better.

Thanks for your help.


  #2  
Old June 20th 05, 01:39 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Phil Thompson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,720
Default WAP and wi-fi

On Mon, 20 Jun 2005 12:45:36 +0100, "F9" wrote:

Do I need to buy a new /modem/router which can run both ethernet and wi-fi
(if one exists) or do I just buy a WAP and ethernet that into my existing
router.


a simple wireless access point will suffice, plugged into one of your
router ports.

Which is neater/better.


you didn't explain your outside connectivity, but I'm guessing fromt
he question that you have an ADSL modem/router, if you replaced this
with one including wireless it would be a single box solution so a bit
neater.

Phil
--
spamcop.net address commissioned 18/06/04
Come on down !
  #3  
Old June 20th 05, 02:10 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Alex Fraser
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 553
Default WAP and wi-fi

"F9" wrote in message
news:[email protected] eranews...
I'm new to the idea of wi-fi and not sure which way to go about the
changeover.

I have a 4 port router at present with two computers etherneted to it. I
want to add a laptop to roam with wi-fi.

The question I think is:

Do I need to buy a new /modem/router which can run both ethernet and
wi-fi (if one exists) or do I just buy a WAP and ethernet that into my
existing router.


You can do either. If you use ADSL, there is the Netgear DG834G, for
example.

Which is neater/better.


I think a single box (replacing your current router) is obviously neater,
simply because it is one less box and plug-top PSU. A seperate AP may be
better, since you can locate it somewhere seperate from the router for
better signal/coverage (if necessary). You could move a combined router too,
but that will involve the cables connecting the two computers plus the WAN
cable (ie telephone line if you use ADSL).

Alex


  #4  
Old June 20th 05, 03:45 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Andrew Oakley
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 37
Default WAP and wi-fi

On Mon, 20 Jun 2005 14:10:53 +0100, "Alex Fraser"
wrote:

I think a single box (replacing your current router) is obviously neater,
simply because it is one less box and plug-top PSU. A seperate AP may be
better, since you can locate it somewhere seperate from the router for
better signal/coverage (if necessary). You could move a combined router too,
but that will involve the cables connecting the two computers plus the WAN
cable (ie telephone line if you use ADSL).


Yes - all agreed.

Another reason to have a seperate access point from your router is
security. With a seperate AP you can firewall it off seperately from
the router, it gives you another line of defence.

Also, buying a seperate AP will generally be twenty quid or more
cheaper than an all-in-one WiFi router.

Finally, if a new WiFi standard such as 802.11N takes hold, it will be
cheaper to upgrade a seperate AP than an all-in-one.

So buy a seperate AP only if:
* You need to save twenty quid, or
* You anticipate upgrading to a newer WiFi standard, or
* You anticipate coverage problems where ease of re-positioning the AP
is important, or
* You have specific security needs, such as you intend to open the
WiFi up to guests or the public through a firewall.

Otherwise get an all-in-one unit.

--
Andrew Oakley andrew/atsymbol/aoakley/stop/com
  #5  
Old June 20th 05, 03:54 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
F9
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 62
Default WAP and wi-fi

"Phil Thompson" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 20 Jun 2005 12:45:36 +0100, "F9" wrote:

Do I need to buy a new /modem/router which can run both ethernet and wi-fi
(if one exists) or do I just buy a WAP and ethernet that into my existing
router.


a simple wireless access point will suffice, plugged into one of your
router ports.

Which is neater/better.


you didn't explain your outside connectivity, but I'm guessing fromt
he question that you have an ADSL modem/router, if you replaced this
with one including wireless it would be a single box solution so a bit
neater.

Phil


Hi. Yes, have ADSL 4-port router at present. So a wi-fi modem router also
has ethernet sockets on it for wired computers?

Sorry for being thick, but it's not easy to get to a shop to physicall
handle one and they are usually shrink wrapped.

Thanks.


  #6  
Old June 20th 05, 06:17 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Phil Thompson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,720
Default WAP and wi-fi

On Mon, 20 Jun 2005 15:54:53 +0100, "F9" wrote:

Hi. Yes, have ADSL 4-port router at present. So a wi-fi modem router also
has ethernet sockets on it for wired computers?


yes, at least one for setting it up (Imagine diabling wireless access
while setting it up wirelessly). Many have 4.

Sorry for being thick, but it's not easy to get to a shop to physicall
handle one and they are usually shrink wrapped.


read the specs on the net. There is a Belkin and Netgear with 4 ports,
and the Tesco Linksys has only one but other Linksys models have 4.

Phil
--
spamcop.net address commissioned 18/06/04
Come on down !
  #7  
Old June 20th 05, 06:20 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
David Rance
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 42
Default WAP and wi-fi

On Mon, 20 Jun 2005 F9 wrote:

Hi. Yes, have ADSL 4-port router at present. So a wi-fi modem router also
has ethernet sockets on it for wired computers?

Sorry for being thick, but it's not easy to get to a shop to physicall
handle one and they are usually shrink wrapped.


But you can find out what you want from the manufacturers' web pages.
Try this, for example:

http://www.usr.com/download/datashee...54/8054-ds.pdf

David
--
David Rance http://www.mesnil.demon.co.uk
Fido Address: 2:252/110 writing from Caversham, Reading, UK

  #9  
Old June 21st 05, 12:36 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
tougharms
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 18
Default WAP and wi-fi

Andrew Oakley wrote in
:

On Mon, 20 Jun 2005 14:10:53 +0100, "Alex Fraser"
wrote:

I think a single box (replacing your current router) is obviously
neater, simply because it is one less box and plug-top PSU. A seperate
AP may be better, since you can locate it somewhere seperate from the
router for better signal/coverage (if necessary). You could move a
combined router too, but that will involve the cables connecting the
two computers plus the WAN cable (ie telephone line if you use ADSL).


Yes - all agreed.

Another reason to have a seperate access point from your router is
security. With a seperate AP you can firewall it off seperately from
the router, it gives you another line of defence.

Also, buying a seperate AP will generally be twenty quid or more
cheaper than an all-in-one WiFi router.

Finally, if a new WiFi standard such as 802.11N takes hold, it will be
cheaper to upgrade a seperate AP than an all-in-one.

So buy a seperate AP only if:
* You need to save twenty quid, or
* You anticipate upgrading to a newer WiFi standard, or
* You anticipate coverage problems where ease of re-positioning the AP
is important, or
* You have specific security needs, such as you intend to open the
WiFi up to guests or the public through a firewall.

Otherwise get an all-in-one unit.

--
Andrew Oakley andrew/atsymbol/aoakley/stop/com


In addition, a separate AP can be switched off when not required. If you
are using the wired connection, do you need to be broadcasting wi-fi all
the time? If someone is desperate to hack your wi-fi (or has nothing
else to do) surely it is easier for them the longer the wi-fi is on.

Switching it off when not required has to be more secure than any
encryption. (Just call me paranoid!)

I had linksys all in one, I could disable wi-fi if required, but this
can only be enabled again from wired connection. So if I forgot to
enable before switching off wired connection (on desktop PC), I could
not use either laptop or PDA to access internet.

I would have to switch on desktop PC, wait for windoze to load, log on
(password), enter wireless setup (another password) and enable wi-fi.
taking approx 4-5 min. Now I have wired network with separate wi-fi AP,
all I have to do is flick 2 mains switches.

 




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