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uk.comp.home-networking (UK home networking) (uk.comp.home-networking) Discussion of all aspects of computer networking in the home, regardless of the platforms, software, topologies and protocols used. Examples of topics include recommendations for hardware or suppliers (e.g. NICs and cabling), protocols, servers, and specific network software. Advertising is not allowed.

Home networking router query?



 
 
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  #1  
Old March 15th 06, 03:56 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Blair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 92
Default Home networking router query?

At present I have a working network between my laptop (XP) and my
desktop(98SE) using a crossover cable. I am connected to ADSL Broadband via
a USB connection
Everything is working well.
I am about to replace the Desktop with another desktop but running XP.
I also wanted in future to be able to run each PC independently so I was
planning to use a router.
I would like to get the router working with my present setup before I
purchase the new Desktop.
I have read numerous technical articles which leave me slightly confused as
to what type of router and connections it should have, that I should buy
and what cables I should use.
Can someone give me a simple answer without being referred to another long
article?
Blair



  #2  
Old March 15th 06, 04:15 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Andrew.Bell
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Home networking router query?

Hello Blair.

To help you with you quest. Firstly you need to distiguish what type of
telephone line you have (ADSL, CABLE,NTL e.t.c).
Once you have done this you nee to buy a router that fits that line. I can
see that you have ADSL, therefore you need a ADSL model router. There is
many available now in all computer shops but to be honest pc world have been
doing some good deals on netgear kits.

Hope this helps.


  #3  
Old March 15th 06, 04:41 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Bernard Peek
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 202
Default Home networking router query?

In message , Blair
writes
At present I have a working network between my laptop (XP) and my
desktop(98SE) using a crossover cable. I am connected to ADSL Broadband via
a USB connection
Everything is working well.
I am about to replace the Desktop with another desktop but running XP.
I also wanted in future to be able to run each PC independently so I was
planning to use a router.
I would like to get the router working with my present setup before I
purchase the new Desktop.
I have read numerous technical articles which leave me slightly confused as
to what type of router and connections it should have, that I should buy
and what cables I should use.
Can someone give me a simple answer without being referred to another long
article?


It is reasonably simple as you already have network cards in each
machine. You need a combined ADSL router and switch, these usually come
with four network ports. You need to run an ordinary network patch cable
from each PC to the router. It is highly likely that at least one of the
ports of the router can be used with either an ordinary patch cable or
the crossover cable you already have. There will be a socket labelled
Uplink and that will accept a crossover cable.

There are lots of different routers, some with wireless connections as
well as wired. Take a look at http://www.adslguide.org.uk/ for help in
choosing.



--
Bernard Peek
London, UK. DBA, Manager, Trainer & Author.

  #4  
Old March 15th 06, 04:42 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Rob Hemmings
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 17
Default Home networking router query?


"Blair" wrote in message
...
At present I have a working network between my laptop (XP) and my
desktop(98SE) using a crossover cable. I am connected to ADSL Broadband

via
a USB connection
Everything is working well.
I am about to replace the Desktop with another desktop but running XP.
I also wanted in future to be able to run each PC independently so I was
planning to use a router.
I would like to get the router working with my present setup before I
purchase the new Desktop.
I have read numerous technical articles which leave me slightly confused

as
to what type of router and connections it should have, that I should buy
and what cables I should use.
Can someone give me a simple answer without being referred to another long
article?


In your situation, I'd use a NAT-enabled ADSL modem/router with
4 ports, which would make your USB ADSL modem redundant.
The advantage here is that the modem/router can be left on 24/7
and any PCs connected to it via their ethernet ports will instantly
be able to connect to the 'net, after they've booted. With a USB
ADSL modem, none of the other PCs will be able to access the
internet unless the PC with the USB modem is already running.
HTH
--
Rob


  #5  
Old March 15th 06, 05:14 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Blair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 92
Default Home networking router query?


"Bernard Peek" wrote in message
...
In message , Blair
writes
At present I have a working network between my laptop (XP) and my
desktop(98SE) using a crossover cable. I am connected to ADSL Broadband

via
a USB connection
Everything is working well.
I am about to replace the Desktop with another desktop but running XP.
I also wanted in future to be able to run each PC independently so I was
planning to use a router.
I would like to get the router working with my present setup before I
purchase the new Desktop.
I have read numerous technical articles which leave me slightly confused

as
to what type of router and connections it should have, that I should

buy
and what cables I should use.
Can someone give me a simple answer without being referred to another

long
article?


It is reasonably simple as you already have network cards in each
machine. You need a combined ADSL router and switch, these usually come
with four network ports. You need to run an ordinary network patch cable
from each PC to the router. It is highly likely that at least one of the
ports of the router can be used with either an ordinary patch cable or
the crossover cable you already have. There will be a socket labelled
Uplink and that will accept a crossover cable.

There are lots of different routers, some with wireless connections as
well as wired. Take a look at http://www.adslguide.org.uk/ for help in
choosing.

--
Bernard Peek
London, UK. DBA, Manager, Trainer & Author.


Thanks for your very clear information. My only query is what does the
switch do ?
Also is wireless connections reasonably error free?
Blair


  #6  
Old March 15th 06, 05:19 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Blair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 92
Default Home networking router query?


"Rob Hemmings" wrote in message
...

"Blair" wrote in message
...
At present I have a working network between my laptop (XP) and my
desktop(98SE) using a crossover cable. I am connected to ADSL Broadband

via
a USB connection
Everything is working well.
I am about to replace the Desktop with another desktop but running XP.
I also wanted in future to be able to run each PC independently so I was
planning to use a router.
I would like to get the router working with my present setup before I
purchase the new Desktop.
I have read numerous technical articles which leave me slightly confused

as
to what type of router and connections it should have, that I should

buy
and what cables I should use.
Can someone give me a simple answer without being referred to another

long
article?


In your situation, I'd use a NAT-enabled ADSL modem/router with
4 ports, which would make your USB ADSL modem redundant.
The advantage here is that the modem/router can be left on 24/7
and any PCs connected to it via their ethernet ports will instantly
be able to connect to the 'net, after they've booted. With a USB
ADSL modem, none of the other PCs will be able to access the
internet unless the PC with the USB modem is already running.
HTH
--
Rob

Thanks for your help What does NAT stand for? Also what does HTH stand for.
Blair


  #7  
Old March 15th 06, 06:39 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Alex Fraser
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 553
Default Home networking router query?

"Blair" wrote in message
...
Thanks for your help What does NAT stand for?


Network Address Translation. This is a name for the technique used in
routers to share a connection between multiple computers.

Also what does HTH stand for.


Hope This Helps.

HTH
Alex


  #8  
Old March 15th 06, 06:39 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Alex Fraser
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 553
Default Home networking router query?

"Blair" wrote in message
...
My only query is what does the switch do ?


Does this help?

http://www.practicallynetworked.com/...hes_hubs.shtml

Also is wireless connections reasonably error free?


Data errors are resolved transparently, but there are more reliability
issues with wireless connections due to their nature.

Alex


  #9  
Old March 15th 06, 07:05 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Chris Whelan
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 89
Default Home networking router query?

Blair wrote:


"Rob Hemmings" wrote in message
...

"Blair" wrote in message
...
At present I have a working network between my laptop (XP) and my
desktop(98SE) using a crossover cable. I am connected to ADSL Broadband

via
a USB connection
Everything is working well.
I am about to replace the Desktop with another desktop but running XP.
I also wanted in future to be able to run each PC independently so I
was planning to use a router.
I would like to get the router working with my present setup before I
purchase the new Desktop.
I have read numerous technical articles which leave me slightly
confused

as
to what type of router and connections it should have, that I should

buy
and what cables I should use.
Can someone give me a simple answer without being referred to another

long
article?


In your situation, I'd use a NAT-enabled ADSL modem/router with
4 ports, which would make your USB ADSL modem redundant.
The advantage here is that the modem/router can be left on 24/7
and any PCs connected to it via their ethernet ports will instantly
be able to connect to the 'net, after they've booted. With a USB
ADSL modem, none of the other PCs will be able to access the
internet unless the PC with the USB modem is already running.
HTH
--
Rob

Thanks for your help What does NAT stand for? Also what does HTH stand
for. Blair


FYI,

http://www.loganact.com/tips/afaik.html

:-)

Chris

--
Remove prejudice to reply.
  #10  
Old March 15th 06, 08:45 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Bernard Peek
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 202
Default Home networking router query?

In message , Blair
writes

It is reasonably simple as you already have network cards in each
machine. You need a combined ADSL router and switch, these usually come
with four network ports. You need to run an ordinary network patch cable
from each PC to the router. It is highly likely that at least one of the
ports of the router can be used with either an ordinary patch cable or
the crossover cable you already have. There will be a socket labelled
Uplink and that will accept a crossover cable.

There are lots of different routers, some with wireless connections as
well as wired. Take a look at http://www.adslguide.org.uk/ for help in
choosing.

--
Bernard Peek
London, UK. DBA, Manager, Trainer & Author.


Thanks for your very clear information. My only query is what does the
switch do ?
Also is wireless connections reasonably error free?


What most people know as a router is actually several different devices
in one box. First is the modem, just like the USB one that you already
use. That converts the analogue tones on the phone wires into digital
signals.

The switch allows multiple network devices to communicate with each
other. Typically the switch you get with an ADSL router has four ports
so you can plug up to four devices in. You sometimes see a similar
device called a hub. In a small network the difference between a hub and
a switch is unimportant. You can buy standalone hubs and switches if you
want to connect more devices.

Between the switch and the modem is the router, which is the complicated
part of the device. The router has an external interface that connects
to the modem. This has an IP address decided by your ISP. It also has an
internal address which you set based on the other addresses you use.
That address is important because you need to point a web browser at it
in order to configure the router. The clever stuff is how the router
moves data from your internal network to the Internet.

It uses Network Address Translation (NAT) to take traffic from an
internal machine with a private IP address (such as 192.168.1.1) and
files off the serial numbers before sending it out to the Internet. Then
when a reply comes back the router works out which internal machine the
reply should go to, and routes it there.

There are other things that might be in the same box, such as a firewall
or a DHCP server that assigns IP addresses to machines on your local
network.

There could also be a Wireless Access Point (WAP) that lets machines
connect to the router and get an Internet connection without more
cables. If you expect to make use of wireless then make a decision
before you buy.

If you expect all of your wireless devices to be used within range of
the place where your router will go then buy a wireless equipped router.
If not then you may have to buy a separate WAP and put a network cable
between it and the router so that you can put the WAP nearer where it is
needed.

Wireless connections are somewhat slower than wired, and get
progressively slower as you get further from the WAP. They are also a
security risk, which could be important if you do any work at home.



--
Bernard Peek
London, UK. DBA, Manager, Trainer & Author.

 




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