A Broadband and ADSL forum. BroadbanterBanter

Welcome to BroadbanterBanter.

You are currently viewing as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions and other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today.

Go Back   Home » BroadbanterBanter forum » Newsgroup Discussions » uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband)
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

Quick clarification on Broadband Speeds



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old April 19th 06, 06:10 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Tanel Kagan
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 17
Default Quick clarification on Broadband Speeds

When a company advertises an 8Mb connection, does that mean 8 megabytes of
data transfer per second? Or are we talking 8 megabits, or even something
else?

In practice, assuming the phone line supports it and everything else is at
optimal setting, what is the maximum data transfer rate on an "8Mb"
connection?

Also, will my speeds be affected if I access around the house with a
Wireless 54Mbps router? I assume that in this case Mbps means "Megabits per
second" and I was led to believe that these wireless routers are around half
the speed of a wired network.

Would I be right in thinking that if "8Mb" means "8 megabits", then I would
notice no difference between a 54Mbps wireless connection and a 100Mbps
wired connection, whereas if "8Mb" means "8 Megabytes" then you would, since
8 megabytes = 64 megabits and this exceeds the top speed of the wireless
router?

Hope someone can help with the confusion.

Many thanks,

Tanel.


  #2  
Old April 19th 06, 06:36 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Rob Walker
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 25
Default Quick clarification on Broadband Speeds


"Tanel Kagan" wrote in message
...
When a company advertises an 8Mb connection, does that mean 8 megabytes of
data transfer per second? Or are we talking 8 megabits, or even something
else?

In practice, assuming the phone line supports it and everything else is at
optimal setting, what is the maximum data transfer rate on an "8Mb"
connection?

Also, will my speeds be affected if I access around the house with a
Wireless 54Mbps router? I assume that in this case Mbps means "Megabits
per
second" and I was led to believe that these wireless routers are around
half
the speed of a wired network.

Would I be right in thinking that if "8Mb" means "8 megabits", then I
would
notice no difference between a 54Mbps wireless connection and a 100Mbps
wired connection, whereas if "8Mb" means "8 Megabytes" then you would,
since
8 megabytes = 64 megabits and this exceeds the top speed of the wireless
router?

Hope someone can help with the confusion.


Generally all transmissions of data are measured in BITS and storage is
measured in BYTES. All internet connections are measured in megabits and so
are other networking figures such as ethernet and wireless. Therefore as you
seem to know, you need to divide any quoted figures by 8 to get a speed in
bytes. Just so you know, wireless transmission speeds are completely false
advertising. You will never achieve more than half the advertised rate with
standard kit, and even then only with a good signal.


  #3  
Old April 19th 06, 07:09 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Roger Mills
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 368
Default Quick clarification on Broadband Speeds

In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
Tanel Kagan wrote:

When a company advertises an 8Mb connection, does that mean 8
megabytes of data transfer per second? Or are we talking 8 megabits,
or even something else?

In practice, assuming the phone line supports it and everything else
is at optimal setting, what is the maximum data transfer rate on an
"8Mb" connection?

Also, will my speeds be affected if I access around the house with a
Wireless 54Mbps router? I assume that in this case Mbps means
"Megabits per second" and I was led to believe that these wireless
routers are around half the speed of a wired network.

Would I be right in thinking that if "8Mb" means "8 megabits", then I
would notice no difference between a 54Mbps wireless connection and a
100Mbps wired connection, whereas if "8Mb" means "8 Megabytes" then
you would, since 8 megabytes = 64 megabits and this exceeds the top
speed of the wireless router?

Hope someone can help with the confusion.

Many thanks,

Tanel.


Your 8 Meg internet connection is 8M BITS (not bytes) per second. So you
divide by 8 to get bytes EXCEPT that there is a 15-20% overhead for all the
handshaking and control data - so you get a more accurate estimate of data
throughput if you divide by 10 rather than 8. Your 8Mbps line will probably
thus deliver about 800k bytes per second when going flat out. However, many
internet servers will be unable to keep up with this - so you'll see a lower
rate.

Your wireless network is far faster than the internet connection - even
allowing for the fact that you won't achieve anything like 54 Mbps in
practice - so that won't be a bottleneck.
--
Cheers,
Roger
______
Email address maintained for newsgroup use only, and not regularly
monitored.. Messages sent to it may not be read for several weeks.
PLEASE REPLY TO NEWSGROUP!


  #4  
Old April 19th 06, 08:54 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Bob Eager
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,472
Default Quick clarification on Broadband Speeds

On Wed, 19 Apr 2006 17:10:25 UTC, "Tanel Kagan"
wrote:

In practice, assuming the phone line supports it and everything else is at
optimal setting, what is the maximum data transfer rate on an "8Mb"
connection?


For a start, BT scale back the actual data rate. For example, a full
8Mb/s connection will get a real 7.15Mb/s by the time overheads and BT
scaling are taken into account. 6816Kb/s will get 6Mb/s, etc.
--
[ 7'ism - a condition by which the sufferer experiences an inability
to give concise answers, express reasoned argument or opinion.
Usually accompanied by silly noises and gestures - incurable, early
euthanasia recommended. ]
  #5  
Old April 19th 06, 11:28 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Mark McIntyre
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,835
Default Quick clarification on Broadband Speeds

On Wed, 19 Apr 2006 18:10:25 +0100, in uk.telecom.broadband , "Tanel
Kagan" wrote:

When a company advertises an 8Mb connection, does that mean 8 megabytes of
data transfer per second? Or are we talking 8 megabits, or even something
else?


it means a maximum data download rate, including system overheads, of
eight megabits per second. The clue is the lower-case b which means
bits. An upper-case B means Bytes.

Also, will my speeds be affected if I access around the house with a
Wireless 54Mbps router?


No, since 54 8. :-)

Would I be right in thinking that if "8Mb" means "8 megabits", then I would
notice no difference between a 54Mbps wireless connection and a 100Mbps
wired connection,


Yup.
Mark McIntyre
--
  #6  
Old April 20th 06, 12:09 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
alexd
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 331
Default Quick clarification on Broadband Speeds

nospam wrote:

Also, will my speeds be affected if I access around the house with a
Wireless 54Mbps router?


No. The bottleneck is your internet connection. Having said that, I have an
802.11b segment on my network, that is slower than my 10Mbit Telewest
circuit - ie sites I know that consistently get the full 10Mbit/s on my
wired part of the lan, get half that on the 802.11b segment.

I assume that in this case Mbps means "Megabits
per second" and I was led to believe that these wireless routers are
around half the speed of a wired network.


Yeah - if you were referring to half the speed of an *unswitched* 100mbit
network, where the whole thing slows down to 1mbit/s because someone with a
poor signal just started transmitting data.

--
http://ale.cx/ (AIM:troffasky) )
00:03:06 up 18 days, 8:52, 4 users, load average: 0.90, 1.45, 1.25
This is my BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOMSTICK

  #7  
Old April 20th 06, 05:48 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Blair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 92
Default Quick clarification on Broadband Speeds


"Tanel Kagan" wrote in message
...
When a company advertises an 8Mb connection, does that mean 8 megabytes of
data transfer per second? Or are we talking 8 megabits, or even something
else?

In practice, assuming the phone line supports it and everything else is at
optimal setting, what is the maximum data transfer rate on an "8Mb"
connection?

Also, will my speeds be affected if I access around the house with a
Wireless 54Mbps router? I assume that in this case Mbps means "Megabits

per
second" and I was led to believe that these wireless routers are around

half
the speed of a wired network.

Would I be right in thinking that if "8Mb" means "8 megabits", then I

would
notice no difference between a 54Mbps wireless connection and a 100Mbps
wired connection, whereas if "8Mb" means "8 Megabytes" then you would,

since
8 megabytes = 64 megabits and this exceeds the top speed of the wireless
router?

Hope someone can help with the confusion.

Many thanks,

Tanel.

I must say at least I am a happy customer with a 2 Mbits connection and a 54
Mbytes transmission for what I do.
Wanadoo did not promise 9Mb.connection.
Blair


  #8  
Old April 20th 06, 04:13 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Tad Confused
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 73
Default Quick clarification on Broadband Speeds


"Rob Walker" wrote in message
. uk...

"Tanel Kagan" wrote in message
...
When a company advertises an 8Mb connection, does that mean 8 megabytes

of
data transfer per second? Or are we talking 8 megabits, or even

something
else?

In practice, assuming the phone line supports it and everything else is

at
optimal setting, what is the maximum data transfer rate on an "8Mb"
connection?

Also, will my speeds be affected if I access around the house with a
Wireless 54Mbps router? I assume that in this case Mbps means "Megabits
per
second" and I was led to believe that these wireless routers are around
half
the speed of a wired network.

Would I be right in thinking that if "8Mb" means "8 megabits", then I
would
notice no difference between a 54Mbps wireless connection and a 100Mbps
wired connection, whereas if "8Mb" means "8 Megabytes" then you would,
since
8 megabytes = 64 megabits and this exceeds the top speed of the wireless
router?

Hope someone can help with the confusion.


Generally all transmissions of data are measured in BITS and storage is
measured in BYTES. All internet connections are measured in megabits and

so
are other networking figures such as ethernet and wireless. Therefore as

you
seem to know, you need to divide any quoted figures by 8 to get a speed in
bytes. Just so you know, wireless transmission speeds are completely false
advertising. You will never achieve more than half the advertised rate

with
standard kit, and even then only with a good signal.


What about the start and stop bits?
You have to divide by 10

:O|






  #9  
Old April 20th 06, 04:19 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Tad Confused
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 73
Default Quick clarification on Broadband Speeds


"Blair" wrote in message
...

"Tanel Kagan" wrote in message
...
When a company advertises an 8Mb connection, does that mean 8 megabytes

of
data transfer per second? Or are we talking 8 megabits, or even

something
else?

In practice, assuming the phone line supports it and everything else is

at
optimal setting, what is the maximum data transfer rate on an "8Mb"
connection?

Also, will my speeds be affected if I access around the house with a
Wireless 54Mbps router? I assume that in this case Mbps means "Megabits

per
second" and I was led to believe that these wireless routers are around

half
the speed of a wired network.

Would I be right in thinking that if "8Mb" means "8 megabits", then I

would
notice no difference between a 54Mbps wireless connection and a 100Mbps
wired connection, whereas if "8Mb" means "8 Megabytes" then you would,

since
8 megabytes = 64 megabits and this exceeds the top speed of the wireless
router?

Hope someone can help with the confusion.

Many thanks,

Tanel.

I must say at least I am a happy customer with a 2 Mbits connection and a

54
Mbytes transmission for what I do.




What the point of a 54meg transmission? You r never going 2 use it.

Wanadoo did not promise 9Mb.connection.
Blair




  #10  
Old April 20th 06, 04:21 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Mark Carver
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 83
Default Quick clarification on Broadband Speeds


Tad Confused wrote:

What the point of a 54meg transmission? You r never going 2 use it.


File sharing between PCs on your home network ?

 




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
NTL Broadband speeds POB uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) 15 December 13th 05 07:13 PM
clarification of 'free upgrades' on plusnet / f2s Tom uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) 4 August 19th 05 03:43 PM
NTL Broadband upload speeds Col uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) 2 April 27th 05 11:00 AM
Clarification on Australian Cable Winston [ausWY] uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) 0 September 2nd 04 12:00 PM
WiFi security - Clarification sought.... Mod uk.comp.home-networking (UK home networking) 7 January 14th 04 09:50 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 09:33 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 2.4.0
Copyright 2004-2019 BroadbanterBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.