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uk.telecom.voip (UK VOIP) (uk.telecom.voip) Discussion of topics relevant to packet based voice technologies including Voice over IP (VoIP), Fax over IP (FoIP), Voice over Frame Relay (VoFR), Voice over Broadband (VoB) and Voice on the Net (VoN) as well as service providers, hardware and software for use with these technologies. Advertising is not allowed.

skype broadband usage?



 
 
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  #1  
Old April 22nd 06, 03:06 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Beck
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Posts: 14
Default skype broadband usage?

My brother has just joined up to Skype and I might consider joining myself.
Am wondering about what sort of bandwidth voip uses generally?


  #2  
Old April 22nd 06, 05:37 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
[email protected]
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Posts: 248
Default skype broadband usage?

On Sat, 22 Apr 2006 15:06:12 +0100, "Beck"
wrote:

My brother has just joined up to Skype and I might consider joining myself.
Am wondering about what sort of bandwidth voip uses generally?


Two different questions.

VOIP uses around 80kb/sec each way when in a call, and almost none the
rest of the time.

Skype is a peer-peer application, and if you have an always-on
connection it can use, it may well pass other people's calls via your
connection to get through firewalls and NAT routers. So it may pass
traffic when you are not making calls. That means there is no way to
know how much data will be transferred.
  #3  
Old April 22nd 06, 06:45 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Alan J. Flavell
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Posts: 126
Default skype broadband usage?

On Sat, 22 Apr 2006, wrote:

Skype is a peer-peer application, and if you have an always-on
connection it can use, it may well pass other people's calls via your
connection to get through firewalls and NAT routers.


I don't use Skype, but I have read the protocol study at
http://www.cs.columbia.edu/techreports/cucs-039-04.pdf

So it may pass traffic when you are not making calls.


yes, if you're selected as a supernode, apparently.

In section 1 it says that "Any node with a public IP address[...]
is a candidate to become a super node".

I had read that as implying that if you were behind a NAT router, you
wouldn't be elegible to become a supernode.

However, in 2.6 it says [...]a Skype client cannot prevent itself
from becoming a super node.

That means there is no way to know how much data will be
transferred.


Indeed this would be a risk for anyone who pays for data volume, or
gets capped if they exceed some limit. Maybe(?) what the sentence in
section 2.6 means is that the S/C software itself has no option to
disable becoming a supernode. But if one can manipulate one's network
situation - by NAT gateway or firewall - maybe it's possible to defeat
this from happening?

I don't really know - just putting it up for discussion...
  #6  
Old April 23rd 06, 01:13 AM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Paul Cupis
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Posts: 802
Default skype broadband usage?

Ivor Jones wrote:
[G711] is probably the most commonly used [VoIP protocol]


Do you have any data to back this up, please?
  #7  
Old April 23rd 06, 01:17 AM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Nho Whei
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Posts: 4
Default skype broadband usage?

On Sat, 22 Apr 2006 18:45:29 +0100, "Alan J. Flavell"
wrote:

On Sat, 22 Apr 2006, wrote:

Skype is a peer-peer application, and if you have an always-on
connection it can use, it may well pass other people's calls via your
connection to get through firewalls and NAT routers.


I don't use Skype, but I have read the protocol study at
http://www.cs.columbia.edu/techreports/cucs-039-04.pdf

So it may pass traffic when you are not making calls.


yes, if you're selected as a supernode, apparently.

In section 1 it says that "Any node with a public IP address[...]
is a candidate to become a super node".

I had read that as implying that if you were behind a NAT router, you
wouldn't be elegible to become a supernode.

However, in 2.6 it says [...]a Skype client cannot prevent itself
from becoming a super node.

That means there is no way to know how much data will be
transferred.


Indeed this would be a risk for anyone who pays for data volume, or
gets capped if they exceed some limit. Maybe(?) what the sentence in
section 2.6 means is that the S/C software itself has no option to
disable becoming a supernode. But if one can manipulate one's network
situation - by NAT gateway or firewall - maybe it's possible to defeat
this from happening?

I don't really know - just putting it up for discussion...

Hmmm ... a tad disconcerting, this aspect of Skype. In the hope of
limiting such usage, I've unticked Options/Connection/Use port 80 &
443. Not sure if it really helps though. The other measures I take are
probably more certain of success. I don't auto start Skype. I fire it
up only when I need to use it, quitting it when done, and since I tend
to only use Skypeout, not being online at other times isn't a problem
for me.
I do this only cause I regularly burst my monthly datacap. Otherwise I
wouldn't bother.
  #8  
Old April 23rd 06, 01:47 AM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Ivor Jones
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Posts: 3,969
Default skype broadband usage?



"Paul Cupis" wrote in message

Ivor Jones wrote:
[G711] is probably the most commonly used [VoIP
protocol]


Do you have any data to back this up, please?


Other than it's been the default setting in every ATA I've ever used, no.
But I'd guess it's true, I'd guess most novice users wouldn't tinker. I
did say "probably" ;-)

Ivor


  #10  
Old April 23rd 06, 06:47 AM posted to uk.telecom.voip
J C
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 11
Default skype broadband usage?

Andrew Gabriel wrote:
In article . ac.uk,
"Alan J. Flavell" writes:
On Sat, 22 Apr 2006, wrote:

Skype is a peer-peer application, and if you have an always-on
connection it can use, it may well pass other people's calls via
your connection to get through firewalls and NAT routers.


I don't use Skype, but I have read the protocol study at
http://www.cs.columbia.edu/techreports/cucs-039-04.pdf

So it may pass traffic when you are not making calls.


yes, if you're selected as a supernode, apparently.

In section 1 it says that "Any node with a public IP address[...]
is a candidate to become a super node".


IME, you become a supernode in well under a minute of going online.
In my observing, you _always_ become a supernode.

I had read that as implying that if you were behind a NAT router, you
wouldn't be elegible to become a supernode.

That means there is no way to know how much data will be
transferred.


Indeed this would be a risk for anyone who pays for data volume, or
gets capped if they exceed some limit. Maybe(?) what the sentence in
section 2.6 means is that the S/C software itself has no option to
disable becoming a supernode. But if one can manipulate one's
network situation - by NAT gateway or firewall - maybe it's possible
to defeat this from happening?

I don't really know - just putting it up for discussion...


I setup my parents' home network. They have real IP addresses
(the family's SIP and STUN servers are on their line). When a
visitor with Skype turned up, their laptop (with Skype installed
but not being used) rapidly started burning up the ADSL bandwidth
(I suspect it was using all the upstream bandwidth). Initially
I thought it was a virus -- I could see the laptop making TCP
connections all around the world, and firing off lots of UDP.
I changed the DHCP server to hand out private network addresses
and the problem was solved. Then I realised it was Skype.


I don't see how this could have helped. Your visitor should still have been
able to use the Internet of course and Skype would still have been useable.
From what I've read it's (by design) very difficult to prevent Skype
working, except locally, I think I've read someone that it's possible by
blocking an initial call to a particular ip address but AFAICT the only way
is by packet inspection on the firewall.


 




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