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NAT and firewalls



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 4th 06, 11:41 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Ben
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10
Default NAT and firewalls

I have a question about NAT routers.

What protection does a hardware NAT router provide for an internal network
against attacks from the outside world ? (I mean without any firewall
software installed on any PCs, just using the router).

And if they do provide protection, then why do you need to install a
firewall on each machine on the internal network?

Currently I have a USB modem connection straight to my PC and use Windows
own firewall on the connection and am fine. But when I get a Voyager 2091
from BT, what extra protection, if any, do you think I might need?

Thanks.


  #2  
Old May 4th 06, 11:55 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Tema
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Posts: 4
Default NAT and firewalls

NAT, or Network Address Translation, is the ability to show one IP
address to the world while concealing the IP addresses of the computers
on the network. It's probably the next best thing to having a router
with a built-in firewall, although not as good.
NAT will protect you from some network-type attacks (Sasser and Blaster
from last year) but other types, like Smurk or Fraggle attacks, may
still get through.

I would recommend that you continue to use the firewall facilities on
each of your PCs, in addition to having the NAT router as the gateway.
Having more protection is no bad thing ;-)

cheers,
T.

--
Tema Hassan
Gravity Internet Ltd
www.gravityinternet.net

  #3  
Old May 4th 06, 12:09 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Ben
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10
Default NAT and firewalls

Thanks for your reply, I will do that.

I was wondering, exactly how it defednds from certain attacks, and why it
fails with others?


"Tema" wrote in message
oups.com...
NAT, or Network Address Translation, is the ability to show one IP
address to the world while concealing the IP addresses of the computers
on the network. It's probably the next best thing to having a router
with a built-in firewall, although not as good.
NAT will protect you from some network-type attacks (Sasser and Blaster
from last year) but other types, like Smurk or Fraggle attacks, may
still get through.

I would recommend that you continue to use the firewall facilities on
each of your PCs, in addition to having the NAT router as the gateway.
Having more protection is no bad thing ;-)

cheers,
T.

--
Tema Hassan
Gravity Internet Ltd
www.gravityinternet.net



  #4  
Old May 4th 06, 12:19 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Tema
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4
Default NAT and firewalls

Fraggle and Smurf-type attacks use a form of address spoofing (the
forging of a sender IP address so that communications appear to come
from a trusted source) to cause your network to flood a third party
with unwanted traffic. A NAT router won't protect you against these
attacks, but a Firewall router will.

  #5  
Old May 4th 06, 11:15 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Colin Wilson
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Posts: 850
Default NAT and firewalls

I was wondering, exactly how it defednds from certain attacks, and why it
fails with others?


I`m no expert on this, but here`s a quick attempt :-}

* The router connects to the internet and gets an IP address

* Each computer plugged into the router is given a different IP address
that only the router knows

* The router remembers which computer asks for information from
somewhere, and will let data back in from that source - ignoring data
from anywhere it wasn`t expecting.

* The router will then forward the data to the correct computer.

NAT (network address translation) is what the router does juggling the
requests for information and sending it to the right computer.
 




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