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uk.comp.home-networking (UK home networking) (uk.comp.home-networking) Discussion of all aspects of computer networking in the home, regardless of the platforms, software, topologies and protocols used. Examples of topics include recommendations for hardware or suppliers (e.g. NICs and cabling), protocols, servers, and specific network software. Advertising is not allowed.

WAP addition to wired network



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 11th 06, 07:55 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Robert
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7
Default WAP addition to wired network

Grateful for advice on establishing simple wireless access from an Axis
207W wireless network camera to my existing wired network which uses a
Draytek Vigor 2500 as a hub.

As I see it I could just replace the 2500 with a wireless router but
this seems an expensive solution if I want to stick with Draytek (I have
been very impressed by the reliability and simplicity of the 2500).
Having done some googling it looks as though a less expensive solution
would be to get a 802.11g WAP to plug into the 2500.

If the location/layout is relevant the distance between WAP and device
is likely to be ~10 metres with one wall in the line of sight.

1) Is this as simple as it sounds or are there likely to be any
conflicts between the kit?

2) Grateful for recommendations for a reliable, simple 802.11g WAP (if
this is thought to be the best solution)

Many thanks
--
Robert
  #2  
Old June 12th 06, 05:32 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Geoff Lane
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 129
Default WAP addition to wired network

On Sun, 11 Jun 2006 19:55:22 +0100, Robert wrote:

Grateful for advice on establishing simple wireless access from an Axis
207W wireless network camera to my existing wired network which uses a
Draytek Vigor 2500 as a hub.


I've got a 2600, excellent products but yes, a wee bit pricey.

WiFi is not always as good as it suggests on the box, I've got four
computers working on WiFi, all different adapters, two laptops, one
handheld and one desktop and all have different ranges.

One laptop gets a signal at the end of my 70 feet garden (Built in
Broadcom) whereas my other laptop (Netgear adapter) struggles about
20 feet away but behind two brick walls.

A lot may depend on where you want the camera to work and where the
WiFi access point will be plugged in.

Geoff Lane

  #3  
Old June 13th 06, 10:26 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Robert
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7
Default WAP addition to wired network

In message , Geoff Lane
writes
On Sun, 11 Jun 2006 19:55:22 +0100, Robert wrote:

Grateful for advice on establishing simple wireless access from an Axis
207W wireless network camera to my existing wired network which uses a
Draytek Vigor 2500 as a hub.


I've got a 2600, excellent products but yes, a wee bit pricey.

WiFi is not always as good as it suggests on the box, I've got four
computers working on WiFi, all different adapters, two laptops, one
handheld and one desktop and all have different ranges.

One laptop gets a signal at the end of my 70 feet garden (Built in
Broadcom) whereas my other laptop (Netgear adapter) struggles about
20 feet away but behind two brick walls.

A lot may depend on where you want the camera to work and where the
WiFi access point will be plugged in.


The camera and WAP would be ~10 metres apart with a concrete block wall
in between - can a simple rule of thumb be applied to the effect a
single thickness of concrete block will have on the range e.g. if the
range is 40 metres without obstruction the wall will roughly reduce the
range by 10 metres?

--
Robert
  #4  
Old June 14th 06, 11:16 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Geoff Lane
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 129
Default WAP addition to wired network

On Tue, 13 Jun 2006 22:26:56 +0100, Robert wrote:


The camera and WAP would be ~10 metres apart with a concrete block wall
in between - can a simple rule of thumb be applied to the effect a
single thickness of concrete block will have on the range e.g. if the
range is 40 metres without obstruction the wall will roughly reduce the
range by 10 metres?


Unfortunately no obvious rule of thumb, as highlighted in my previous
post different makes of cards have different ranges.

Have you considered www.homeplugs.co.uk

I've not tried one but have heard reasonable reports about them.

Geoff Lane


  #5  
Old June 14th 06, 05:06 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
MED
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 11
Default WAP addition to wired network


"Robert" wrote in message
...
Grateful for advice on establishing simple wireless access from an Axis
207W wireless network camera to my existing wired network which uses a
Draytek Vigor 2500 as a hub.

As I see it I could just replace the 2500 with a wireless router but this
seems an expensive solution if I want to stick with Draytek (I have been
very impressed by the reliability and simplicity of the 2500). Having done
some googling it looks as though a less expensive solution would be to get
a 802.11g WAP to plug into the 2500.

If the location/layout is relevant the distance between WAP and device is
likely to be ~10 metres with one wall in the line of sight.

1) Is this as simple as it sounds or are there likely to be any conflicts
between the kit?

2) Grateful for recommendations for a reliable, simple 802.11g WAP (if
this is thought to be the best solution)

Many thanks
--
Robert


Hi,

Just an addition to Geoff's post. He is correct that there is no reliable
way of predicting the signal loss due to obstructions.

The make of cards does have an effect on the range as does the make of
wireless AP.

The thicker the wall, the greater the reduction in signal strength.
Material is also a factor: paper, wood, concrete. Also, beware of thin
plaster walls that have been insulated with tin-foil - good for heat, bad
for radio signals.

Mike.


 




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