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uk.comp.home-networking (UK home networking) (uk.comp.home-networking) Discussion of all aspects of computer networking in the home, regardless of the platforms, software, topologies and protocols used. Examples of topics include recommendations for hardware or suppliers (e.g. NICs and cabling), protocols, servers, and specific network software. Advertising is not allowed.

IP country identification?



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 12th 06, 12:07 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
[ste parker]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 130
Default IP country identification?

Despite being sat in an office in the UK, I'm unable to access a lot of
(streaming) content on the BBC website from work due to the network
being routed through the US (or that's where we get our external IP from
anyway). Is there an easy way round this? Any (preferably free) UK
based open proxies or anonymisers? The only things I've found still
give me a non-UK IP (megaproxy.com, proxify.com).

Considering I've just shelled out 130 for a TV licence, and also my
workplace has a paid up licence too it's annoying that I can't check out
any world cup highlights online over lunch!

--
"Global warming, earthquakes, hurricanes, and other natural
disasters are a direct effect of the shrinking numbers of
Pirates since the 1800s"
  #2  
Old June 12th 06, 08:58 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Clint Sharp
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 550
Default IP country identification?

In message , "[ste parker]"
writes
Despite being sat in an office in the UK, I'm unable to access a lot of
(streaming) content on the BBC website from work due to the network
being routed through the US (or that's where we get our external IP
from anyway). Is there an easy way round this? Any (preferably free)
UK based open proxies or anonymisers? The only things I've found still
give me a non-UK IP (megaproxy.com, proxify.com).

Set your own up at home? Had a link for free software somewhere, I'll
look it up if you like?

Considering I've just shelled out 130 for a TV licence, and also my
workplace has a paid up licence too it's annoying that I can't check
out any world cup highlights online over lunch!

Hmm, over lunch?
--
Clint Sharp
  #3  
Old June 12th 06, 11:20 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
[ste parker]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 130
Default IP country identification?

Clint Sharp wrote:
In message , "[ste parker]"
writes

Despite being sat in an office in the UK, I'm unable to access a lot of
(streaming) content on the BBC website from work due to the network
being routed through the US (or that's where we get our external IP


from anyway). Is there an easy way round this? Any (preferably free)


UK based open proxies or anonymisers? The only things I've found still
give me a non-UK IP (megaproxy.com, proxify.com).


Set your own up at home? Had a link for free software somewhere, I'll
look it up if you like?


If you wouldn't mind, that sounds interesting at the least.

Considering I've just shelled out 130 for a TV licence, and also my
workplace has a paid up licence too it's annoying that I can't check
out any world cup highlights online over lunch!


Hmm, over lunch?


Yeah, I'm giving presentations through the day this week so it's genuine
for once

--
[ste]
  #4  
Old June 13th 06, 09:41 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Peter M
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,496
Default IP country identification?

On 12 Jun 2006, "[ste parker]" wrote:

Is there an easy way round this?


If there were, could you imagine anyone being daft enough to post about it?

From the front cover of T3 magazine, there's now a portable Freeview unit.
Sorry, only saw the front cover in the newsagent, and don't have the mag.

What I wonder about is the chance of anyone being caught out by this licence
requirement, where all it needs is someone to be watching and a fine of up
to 1000 pounds can be made. Odds of catching them may be low, unless the
TV people will be getting IP info from the BBC (not all that difficult,
after all) and requesting every connection be linked back to an address...

Again not that difficult - imagine the threat to an ISP of "no info about
customers will mean we give no feed to your IP ranges" ! Peter M.
  #5  
Old June 13th 06, 01:17 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
[ste parker]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 130
Default IP country identification?

Peter M wrote:
On 12 Jun 2006, "[ste parker]" wrote:

Is there an easy way round this?


If there were, could you imagine anyone being daft enough to post about it?


Yes. What's daft about the possibility of an anonymiser that gives a UK
IP? Is it illegal? The "daft" thing is that even if I had no TV
licence I could quite happily watch all the BBC web content I wanted
from home.

From the front cover of T3 magazine, there's now a portable Freeview unit.
Sorry, only saw the front cover in the newsagent, and don't have the mag.


I'm aware of these. The point was a service is legally paid up for that
I'm not able to make use of just because of where a network connection
happens to be routed.

What I wonder about is the chance of anyone being caught out by this licence
requirement, where all it needs is someone to be watching and a fine of up
to 1000 pounds can be made. Odds of catching them may be low, unless the
TV people will be getting IP info from the BBC (not all that difficult,
after all) and requesting every connection be linked back to an address...


Is there an actual requirement of having a TV licence to view BBC web
content? Surely that's not far from saying it's illegal to listen to
the Radio 1 without a TV licence? I wouldn't have thought there was,
but I would have hoped that actually having a valid TV licence both at
home and at the workplace would allow viewing of the content whilst in
said workplace. If I'm wrong, well I never knew that.

--
"Global warming, earthquakes, hurricanes, and other natural
disasters are a direct effect of the shrinking numbers of
Pirates since the 1800s"
  #6  
Old June 13th 06, 03:57 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Peter M
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,496
Default IP country identification?

On 13 Jun 2006, "[ste parker]" wrote:

Is there an actual requirement of having a TV licence to view BBC web
content?


Apparently. I'm not about to "test it" because I don't want to throw
a thousand pounds away on a fine. I'd prefer the whole lot made into
pay services and scrap the licence. I know some feel that just radio
is worth the money, but I see the expansion of the BBC as just a huge
drain (how much does it cost to run these big screens, and WTF do the
BBC want to operate them, as they seem just a frivolous waste of cash
to me).


I would have hoped that actually having a valid TV licence both at
home and at the workplace would allow viewing of the content whilst
in said workplace.


We're not "chipped" with all our details yet, to be scanned so our NI
number, home address, and TV licence status can be checked, so in the
meantime, a simple IP number test is about all they can easily do for
a quick and easy check of who can and who cannot use the service. If
they didn't use any test, or it was easily circumvented, then getting
agreements to allow them to cover sporting and other events would get
withdrawn, so you're an unfortunate victim to the restrictions placed
on the BBC by FIFA (?) in this case... I know that when there was R5
broadcast as a test service on Astra from 19.2E (the old analogue sat
with lots of German stations and a few encrypted Sky services) they'd
have to put a repeating audio loop on when during sports commentaries
where they were restricted to UK rights... Peter M.
  #7  
Old June 13th 06, 05:45 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Fred
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 42
Default IP country identification?


"[ste parker]" wrote in message
...
Despite being sat in an office in the UK, I'm unable to access a lot of
(streaming) content on the BBC website from work due to the network being
routed through the US (or that's where we get our external IP from
anyway). Is there an easy way round this? Any (preferably free) UK based
open proxies or anonymisers? The only things I've found still give me a
non-UK IP (megaproxy.com, proxify.com).

Considering I've just shelled out 130 for a TV licence, and also my
workplace has a paid up licence too it's annoying that I can't check out
any world cup highlights online over lunch!


Have a look at OnSpeed. I don't know if they are still working but it was
designed to speed up dial up connections. However it also worked with
broadband and as I found to my cost appears to be a good anonymiser as well.


  #8  
Old June 13th 06, 10:36 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
stephen
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 381
Default IP country identification?

"[ste parker]" wrote in message
...
Peter M wrote:
On 12 Jun 2006, "[ste parker]" wrote:

Is there an easy way round this?


If there were, could you imagine anyone being daft enough to post about

it?


Yes. What's daft about the possibility of an anonymiser that gives a UK
IP? Is it illegal?


No - or not for the TV licence.

there might be some stuff to do with getting around restrictions on specific
content?

The "daft" thing is that even if I had no TV
licence I could quite happily watch all the BBC web content I wanted
from home.

From the front cover of T3 magazine, there's now a portable Freeview

unit.
Sorry, only saw the front cover in the newsagent, and don't have the

mag.


I'm aware of these. The point was a service is legally paid up for that
I'm not able to make use of just because of where a network connection
happens to be routed.


None of the IP to geography mapping schemes are 100% perfect. if it is a big
issue, then maybe you need a local broadband link hooked into your network

or complain on the BBC web site and see if they can suggest a fix?

it cannot be that efficient to push local traffic across to the US before it
breaks out to the Internet, since the company will be paying for that
bandwidth in some way.


What I wonder about is the chance of anyone being caught out by this

licence
requirement, where all it needs is someone to be watching and a fine of

up
to 1000 pounds can be made. Odds of catching them may be low, unless

the
TV people will be getting IP info from the BBC (not all that difficult,
after all) and requesting every connection be linked back to an

address...


Is there an actual requirement of having a TV licence to view BBC web
content? Surely that's not far from saying it's illegal to listen to
the Radio 1 without a TV licence? I wouldn't have thought there was,
but I would have hoped that actually having a valid TV licence both at
home and at the workplace would allow viewing of the content whilst in
said workplace. If I'm wrong, well I never knew that.


the BBC page on licencing only mentions that you need a licence with PC if
you have a tuner card and watch live broadcast TV. After all, it is a "TV"
licence....

more to the point, if the place you watch in is licenced you are covered.

--
"Global warming, earthquakes, hurricanes, and other natural
disasters are a direct effect of the shrinking numbers of
Pirates since the 1800s"

--
Regards

- replace xyz with ntl


  #9  
Old June 13th 06, 11:56 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Trev
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 53
Default IP country identification?


"[ste parker]" wrote in message
...
Peter M wrote:
On 12 Jun 2006, "[ste parker]" wrote:

Is there an easy way round this?


If there were, could you imagine anyone being daft enough to post about
it?


Yes. What's daft about the possibility of an anonymiser that gives a UK
IP? Is it illegal? The "daft" thing is that even if I had no TV licence
I could quite happily watch all the BBC web content I wanted from home.

From the front cover of T3 magazine, there's now a portable Freeview
unit.
Sorry, only saw the front cover in the newsagent, and don't have the mag.


I'm aware of these. The point was a service is legally paid up for that
I'm not able to make use of just because of where a network connection
happens to be routed.

What I wonder about is the chance of anyone being caught out by this
licence
requirement, where all it needs is someone to be watching and a fine of
up to 1000 pounds can be made. Odds of catching them may be low, unless
the TV people will be getting IP info from the BBC (not all that
difficult, after all) and requesting every connection be linked back to
an address...


Is there an actual requirement of having a TV licence to view BBC web
content? Surely that's not far from saying it's illegal to listen to the
Radio 1 without a TV licence? I wouldn't have thought there was, but I
would have hoped that actually having a valid TV licence both at home and
at the workplace would allow viewing of the content whilst in said
workplace. If I'm wrong, well I never knew that.

Ok I'm curious Is this the BBC Broadband services that are only available
though participating ISP's.
In my case I had to connect to BBC though a page on the Pipex web site


  #10  
Old June 14th 06, 07:43 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
stephen
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 381
Default IP country identification?

"Trev" trevbowdenAT.dsl.pipex.COM wrote in message
...

"[ste parker]" wrote in message
...
Peter M wrote:
On 12 Jun 2006, "[ste parker]" wrote:

Is there an easy way round this?

If there were, could you imagine anyone being daft enough to post about
it?


Yes. What's daft about the possibility of an anonymiser that gives a UK
IP? Is it illegal? The "daft" thing is that even if I had no TV

licence
I could quite happily watch all the BBC web content I wanted from home.

From the front cover of T3 magazine, there's now a portable Freeview
unit.
Sorry, only saw the front cover in the newsagent, and don't have the

mag.


I'm aware of these. The point was a service is legally paid up for that
I'm not able to make use of just because of where a network connection
happens to be routed.

What I wonder about is the chance of anyone being caught out by this
licence
requirement, where all it needs is someone to be watching and a fine of
up to 1000 pounds can be made. Odds of catching them may be low,

unless
the TV people will be getting IP info from the BBC (not all that
difficult, after all) and requesting every connection be linked back to
an address...


Is there an actual requirement of having a TV licence to view BBC web
content? Surely that's not far from saying it's illegal to listen to

the
Radio 1 without a TV licence? I wouldn't have thought there was, but I
would have hoped that actually having a valid TV licence both at home

and
at the workplace would allow viewing of the content whilst in said
workplace. If I'm wrong, well I never knew that.

Ok I'm curious Is this the BBC Broadband services that are only available
though participating ISP's.


AFAIK they are available to IP adr that the BBC consider to be where people
pay their licence fee - ie "UK".

BBC use peering to the ISPs to limit bandwidth charges - they were peering
with a few hundred ISPs a couple of years - mainly UK but others as well.

Their peering policy said something like "traffic to anyone, but if you eat
a lot of bandwidth we want to peering arrangement"

There are some services restricted to participating ISPs - e.g. they are
running a multicast IP streaming trial, but ISPs have to have their
infrastructure ready for that and so "sign up" to pass the traffic.

In my case I had to connect to BBC though a page on the Pipex web site

--
Regards

- replace xyz with ntl


 




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