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Networking help for a terminally confused newbie.



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 18th 06, 12:45 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Michael Swift
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 55
Default Networking help for a terminally confused newbie.

It looks like my last matched pair of sons will move out soon so I have
a spare bedroom to turn into an office/study.

I have a 2/4 meg NTL cable modem in the lounge at the moment but thought
of setting up a wireless network so I don't have to have the cables
moved, I've read a few threads in the group and got the impression
wireless isn't as fast as wire so :-

Is this true?

Is a card or USB dongle the best receiver if wireless is OK?

Would it be better to let NTL re-cable, the cost difference would be
minimal bearing in mind when the sons move out I only need to connect
one PC.

Many Thanks.

Mike

--
Michael Swift We do not regard Englishmen as foreigners.
Kirkheaton We look on them only as rather mad Norwegians.
Yorkshire Halvard Lange
  #2  
Old June 18th 06, 10:53 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Colin Wilson
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Posts: 850
Default Networking help for a terminally confused newbie.

I have a 2/4 meg NTL cable modem in the lounge at the moment but thought
of setting up a wireless network so I don't have to have the cables
moved, I've read a few threads in the group and got the impression
wireless isn't as fast as wire so :-
Is this true?


Wireless "is" slower, but unless you're swapping files in-house you
won't notice any difference - even the slowest wireless protocol was
(IIRC) 11Mbits/sec - already more than double the speed of the incoming
data traffic.

Is a card or USB dongle the best receiver if wireless is OK?


I believe USB dongles are often better, as you can reposition them
easily. That said...

Would it be better to let NTL re-cable, the cost difference would be
minimal bearing in mind when the sons move out I only need to connect
one PC.


Wireless isn't particularly secure (although you can limit the exposure
by using encryption), but can be a real pain in the ass when it doesn't
want to work - I seem to be getting called to my wifes' friends' house
every month or so because it just doesn't want to play ball any more.
Its paired with a Voyager 2100 router - when it wants to.

On that note, avoid the Belkin dongle (model no. F5D7050 v2) - it uses
its own connection utility, not the built in Windows newtworking, and
its ****e. It even came with the wrong drivers (for the earlier variant)
in the box ffs (as bought in Office World).

Personally, i`d be strongly tempted to stick with wired - I have, but
perhaps i`m a luddite...
  #3  
Old June 18th 06, 11:42 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
gort
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 101
Default Networking help for a terminally confused newbie.


Personally, i`d be strongly tempted to stick with wired - I have, but
perhaps i`m a luddite...


No your not, you have wisely not fallen prey to all the hype about
wireless.

Dave

  #4  
Old June 18th 06, 12:12 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Retired
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6
Default Networking help for a terminally confused newbie.

Go for wired if you can. For wireless, you generally need to physically
connect the PC to the modem-router to set it up. (I theory you don't, but in
practice you do - I don't know anyone who has set up a modem remotely)
I have a lap-top and a second computer that I connect by wireless, once
connected they are OK, but sometimes they simply won't connect.

Retired



"Michael Swift" wrote in message
...
It looks like my last matched pair of sons will move out soon so I have
a spare bedroom to turn into an office/study.

I have a 2/4 meg NTL cable modem in the lounge at the moment but thought
of setting up a wireless network so I don't have to have the cables
moved, I've read a few threads in the group and got the impression
wireless isn't as fast as wire so :-

Is this true?

Is a card or USB dongle the best receiver if wireless is OK?

Would it be better to let NTL re-cable, the cost difference would be
minimal bearing in mind when the sons move out I only need to connect
one PC.

Many Thanks.

Mike

--
Michael Swift We do not regard Englishmen as foreigners.
Kirkheaton We look on them only as rather mad Norwegians.
Yorkshire Halvard Lange



  #5  
Old June 18th 06, 12:31 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Loz
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Posts: 65
Default Networking help for a terminally confused newbie.

gort wrote:
Personally, i`d be strongly tempted to stick with wired - I have, but
perhaps i`m a luddite...


No your not, you have wisely not fallen prey to all the hype about
wireless.


Maybe somewhat, but it is useful, for example.

Laptop users
People in rented accommodation

Cables are a lot faster. But I couldn't say wireless is unreliable or
difficult to set up - and least you don't need to work out where to put
the cables!






  #6  
Old June 18th 06, 12:41 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
gort
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 101
Default Networking help for a terminally confused newbie.

once
connected they are OK, but sometimes they simply won't connect.

Retired


People forget that wireless is subject to interference at various times.

Dave
  #7  
Old June 18th 06, 12:46 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
gort
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 101
Default Networking help for a terminally confused newbie.


Maybe somewhat, but it is useful, for example.

Laptop users
People in rented accommodation

Cables are a lot faster. But I couldn't say wireless is unreliable or
difficult to set up - and least you don't need to work out where to put
the cables!


Agreed, but if you only ever setup one installation and that works first
time, you become biased. I have setup quite a few in different types of
buildings and it is not infalliable. You do need to work out where to put
a wireless router in some places, move 6 metres and it wont work. Wireless
is subject to interference, as is all radio, which can vary from month to
month.
There is a lot which can go wrong even in home installations.

Dave

  #8  
Old June 18th 06, 12:49 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Loz
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 65
Default Networking help for a terminally confused newbie.

gort wrote:


Agreed, but if you only ever setup one installation and that works first
time, you become biased. I have setup quite a few in different types of
buildings and it is not infalliable. You do need to work out where to put
a wireless router in some places, move 6 metres and it wont work. Wireless
is subject to interference, as is all radio, which can vary from month to
month.
There is a lot which can go wrong even in home installations.


Absolutely but I have set up about half a dozen now - and I have had to
move all but 1 of the routers slightly in order for it to work where I
wanted to use the machine.

If you have a house with particularly thick walls it won't work. Stud
plaster doesn't seem to reduce the signal by much, but a couple of solid
supporting wall will all but kill it.

I still like the technology though!

  #9  
Old June 18th 06, 12:50 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Loz
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 65
Default Networking help for a terminally confused newbie.

gort wrote:
once
connected they are OK, but sometimes they simply won't connect.

Retired


People forget that wireless is subject to interference at various times.



On a rather busy piece of spectrum as well. Though I do sit here on my
bluetooth headset and it doesn't seem to make any difference (it more
than likely will be, but just not enough for me to notice!)




  #10  
Old June 18th 06, 02:04 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
gort
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 101
Default Networking help for a terminally confused newbie.


If you have a house with particularly thick walls it won't work. Stud
plaster doesn't seem to reduce the signal by much, but a couple of solid
supporting wall will all but kill it.


Wait till you come to a house with foil backed plasterboard !!g

Cheers

Dave

 




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