A Broadband and ADSL forum. BroadbanterBanter

Welcome to BroadbanterBanter.

You are currently viewing as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions and other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today.

Go Back   Home » BroadbanterBanter forum » Newsgroup Discussions » uk.comp.home-networking (UK home networking)
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

uk.comp.home-networking (UK home networking) (uk.comp.home-networking) Discussion of all aspects of computer networking in the home, regardless of the platforms, software, topologies and protocols used. Examples of topics include recommendations for hardware or suppliers (e.g. NICs and cabling), protocols, servers, and specific network software. Advertising is not allowed.

Buffalo NAS



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old August 7th 06, 07:32 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Buffalo NAS

I've been looking at the Buffalo network attached storage device with
installed Linux OS.

The model I am looking at included a USB printer server as well as a USB
(I assume that makes 2) soccket to allow an extra external hard drive for
expansion.

If anyone has experience of this device I am wondering; is it a DHCP
server issuing its own IP addresses and also, if a USB hub is plugged in
to the extra USB outlet would it effectively run numerous extra external
HDs on the network.

Geoff Lane

  #2  
Old August 7th 06, 09:11 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Buffalo NAS

"Geoff Lane" wrote in message
news
I've been looking at the Buffalo network attached storage device with
installed Linux OS.

The model I am looking at included a USB printer server as well as a USB
(I assume that makes 2) soccket to allow an extra external hard drive for
expansion.

If anyone has experience of this device I am wondering; is it a DHCP
server issuing its own IP addresses and also, if a USB hub is plugged in
to the extra USB outlet would it effectively run numerous extra external
HDs on the network.

Geoff Lane


I have two of the HG400LAN's (Gigabit NIC 400GB Disk)
It has a USB port on the back and one on the front - one is for the printer,
the other is for another disk - I haven't used either yet, but I understand
you have to use a particular one for each device. You can only install one
disk and one printer at the moment, maybe they will change the firmware at
some point (Let's hope)

It doesn't have a DHCP server, but it can obtain an IP from a DHCP server
(Or you can set it manually)

Sparks...


  #3  
Old August 8th 06, 11:07 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Buffalo NAS


"Sparks" wrote in message
...
"Geoff Lane" wrote in message
news
I've been looking at the Buffalo network attached storage device with
installed Linux OS.

The model I am looking at included a USB printer server as well as a USB
(I assume that makes 2) soccket to allow an extra external hard drive

for
expansion.

If anyone has experience of this device I am wondering; is it a DHCP
server issuing its own IP addresses and also, if a USB hub is plugged in
to the extra USB outlet would it effectively run numerous extra external
HDs on the network.

Geoff Lane


I have two of the HG400LAN's (Gigabit NIC 400GB Disk)
It has a USB port on the back and one on the front - one is for the

printer,
the other is for another disk - I haven't used either yet, but I

understand
you have to use a particular one for each device. You can only install one
disk and one printer at the moment, maybe they will change the firmware at
some point (Let's hope)

It doesn't have a DHCP server, but it can obtain an IP from a DHCP server
(Or you can set it manually)

Sparks...


I also have the 160gb Linkstation- i dont use the USB ports either, but I
understand the front one is Printer only, and the back one can be both. You
can use some flash disks as well as an external USB harddrive apparently,
although data written to these by the linkstation will not be accessable if
you plugged the drive direct to a PC. I think it uses its own strange FAT of
some sort.

I run it from a DG834 with DCHP turned off and it allocated a fixed IP
address- I know what ip to type into a IE window to find it that way!

Does what it says on the box and is reasonably quick.- but for some reason
forgets the date and time settings when mains input is lost.

I think the netgear toaster is more versatile and expandable though??

Tim..


  #4  
Old August 8th 06, 11:42 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Buffalo NAS

On Tue, 08 Aug 2006 11:07:15 +0100, Tim.. wrote:

I also have the 160gb Linkstation- i dont use the USB ports either, but I
understand the front one is Printer only, and the back one can be both. You
can use some flash disks as well as an external USB harddrive apparently,
although data written to these by the linkstation will not be accessable if
you plugged the drive direct to a PC. I think it uses its own strange FAT of
some sort.


Internally, the Linkstations uses Linux ext3 with journaling. I've never
tried connecting my printer through the USB port since my laser is
network-ready and my inkjet is wireless-ready. I do believe the external
USB hardrive should be formatted using VFAT, since the kernel used
couldn't mount NTFS filesystem.. I might be wrong though since I never
have a need to add another external HD to my linkstation.

I run it from a DG834 with DCHP turned off and it allocated a fixed IP
address- I know what ip to type into a IE window to find it that way!


I've static DHCP set on my WRT54GS router and I could just use the
hostname I assigned to the linkstation (ls2) without a need to remember
the IP address at all. If I need to access it without going through the
file explore tree, I just use file:\\ls2

Does what it says on the box and is reasonably quick.- but for some reason
forgets the date and time settings when mains input is lost.


Most probably it doesn't set to retrieve the date/time from ntp server?
Since my is no longer a virgin linkstation (it is running full Debian
Sarge's Linux distribution), couldn't really check this one out.

I think the netgear toaster is more versatile and expandable though??


You could freely open and add your own hard disk to the toaster and it
does run on Linux too. But the current linkstation has more powerful
processor and more RAM too (MIPS 400Mhz + 64MB RAM).

http://www.linkstationwiki.net if you need more information on hacking the
Linkstation and convert it to a small server (I'm using it to be my
network PDC and it has ftp and http server running at the moment).

  #5  
Old August 9th 06, 07:31 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Buffalo NAS

On Tue, 08 Aug 2006 10:42:15 +0000, Wira One wrote:


I also have the 160gb Linkstation-


I think the netgear toaster is more versatile and expandable though??


You could freely open and add your own hard disk to the toaster and it
does run on Linux too. But the current linkstation has more powerful
processor and more RAM too (MIPS 400Mhz + 64MB RAM).


Why do you think the netgear device is more versatile, I was personally
looking at the buffalo unit because of the printer server, this on its own
would cost me about 40 pounds so would make it quite useful for me.

Geoff Lane

  #6  
Old August 9th 06, 07:43 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Buffalo NAS


"Geoff Lane" wrote in message
news
On Tue, 08 Aug 2006 10:42:15 +0000, Wira One wrote:


I also have the 160gb Linkstation-


I think the netgear toaster is more versatile and expandable though??


You could freely open and add your own hard disk to the toaster and it
does run on Linux too. But the current linkstation has more powerful
processor and more RAM too (MIPS 400Mhz + 64MB RAM).


Why do you think the netgear device is more versatile, I was personally
looking at the buffalo unit because of the printer server, this on its own
would cost me about 40 pounds so would make it quite useful for me.

Geoff Lane


As far as I understand it, the Netgear "toaster" requires software loading
on each client PC, where as the Buffalo does not - this was the main reason
I got the Buffalo (Plus the fact I have read a lot of negative comments
about the Netgear "toaster")

Sparks...


  #7  
Old August 9th 06, 10:37 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Buffalo NAS

"Sparks" wrote in message


[snip]

I have two of the HG400LAN's (Gigabit NIC 400GB Disk)
It has a USB port on the back and one on the front - one
is for the printer, the other is for another disk - I
haven't used either yet, but I understand you have to use
a particular one for each device. You can only install
one disk and one printer at the moment, maybe they will
change the firmware at some point (Let's hope)
It doesn't have a DHCP server, but it can obtain an IP
from a DHCP server (Or you can set it manually)


Sounds similar to my Maxtor H14R300 device. Although mine has two USB
sockets which are both usable for either printers or additional USB
drives.

I have one question though, why can I buy a 300GB USB drive for under 100
but the same capacity NAS device costs twice as much..?!

Ivor


  #8  
Old August 9th 06, 10:40 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Buffalo NAS

"Geoff Lane" wrote in
message
news
On Tue, 08 Aug 2006 10:42:15 +0000, Wira One wrote:


I also have the 160gb Linkstation-


I think the netgear toaster is more versatile and
expandable though??


You could freely open and add your own hard disk to the
toaster and it does run on Linux too. But the current
linkstation has more powerful processor and more RAM
too (MIPS 400Mhz + 64MB RAM).


Why do you think the netgear device is more versatile, I
was personally looking at the buffalo unit because of the
printer server, this on its own would cost me about 40
pounds so would make it quite useful for me.


A friend of mine claims to have spoken to one of the developers of the
Netgear device and was told to avoid it..! I don't know why, but I took
the advice and bought a Maxtor H14R300 which has so far been faultless.

Ivor


 




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Buffalo WHR-HP-G54 or USR MAXg [email protected] uk.comp.home-networking (UK home networking) 1 April 25th 06 03:09 PM
Buffalo WHR-HP-G54 or USR MAXg [email protected] uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) 1 April 25th 06 03:09 PM
Buffalo Airstation WBR2-G54. HIDE34 uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) 0 July 28th 05 12:28 PM
Buffalo Airstation G54 Jim uk.comp.home-networking (UK home networking) 1 March 1st 05 09:51 AM
Buffalo WBR-54G and DLink DSL-300G+ Daniel Clarke uk.comp.home-networking (UK home networking) 0 January 27th 04 08:36 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 03:48 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 2.4.0
Copyright 2004-2019 BroadbanterBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.