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uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

Can someone explain master socket for me?



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 26th 06, 03:20 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
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Default Can someone explain master socket for me?

I moved into this new build property 18 months ago. There was no phone
connection at all. I ordered a phone. Three weeks later (Christmas got
in the way, I suppose) BT came and connected the phone. The BT
engineer removed the socket in the hall and enabled something so that
all other sockets in the house are enabled. I can access the phone or
plug in a modem via any socket. He intimated that this was an 'extra'
that I'd normally pay 'extra' for, but all he wanted in return was a
cup of tea.

If I get broadband, will I still be able to use any socket either for
phone or broadband?

Where does "master socket" figure in all of this?

Do I have one already? How could I tell?

Somewhere I read that a "central splitter" could be needed to separate
the ADSL signal from the phone signal. Would that apply in my case?
How could I tell?

Is there a novice's guide anywhere on the internet that describes the
whole palaver of converting/connecting to broadband in the UK?

Thanks.

MM
  #2  
Old August 26th 06, 03:35 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Can someone explain master socket for me?

Thus spaketh MM:
I moved into this new build property 18 months ago. There was no phone
connection at all. I ordered a phone. Three weeks later (Christmas got
in the way, I suppose) BT came and connected the phone. The BT
engineer removed the socket in the hall and enabled something so that
all other sockets in the house are enabled. I can access the phone or
plug in a modem via any socket. He intimated that this was an 'extra'
that I'd normally pay 'extra' for, but all he wanted in return was a
cup of tea.

If I get broadband, will I still be able to use any socket either for
phone or broadband?

Where does "master socket" figure in all of this?

Do I have one already? How could I tell?

Somewhere I read that a "central splitter" could be needed to separate
the ADSL signal from the phone signal. Would that apply in my case?
How could I tell?

Is there a novice's guide anywhere on the internet that describes the
whole palaver of converting/connecting to broadband in the UK?

Thanks.

MM



The master socket will be the socket that the incoming wiring is
connected to first, other sockets will be extensions/slaves of this, the
master socket has a capacitor to provide ringing for phones that don't
have their own ringing capacitor, the extensions get their ringing from
being wired to the master (pin 3).

You can use any socket for broadband, though on very ropey lines it
sometimes only reliably works from the master socket.

The filter or as some people call them splitters, just filter the
broadband noise away from the 'speech' side of the line, some call them
splitters as many have a connection for broadband (unfiltered) and a
connection for your phones/fax machine/Sky box (filtered).

You need to use a filter on any socket that has a phone/Sky Box/fax
machine etc on it.


--
DVD rental: www.southeastbirmingham.co.uk/dvd
PAYG Mobile Offers: www.southeastbirmingham.co.uk/payg
Items for sale: www.dodgy-dealer.co.uk

  #3  
Old August 26th 06, 03:50 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Can someone explain master socket for me?

On Sat, 26 Aug 2006 14:35:21 GMT, "{{{{{Welcome}}}}}"
wrote:

Thus spaketh MM:
I moved into this new build property 18 months ago. There was no phone
connection at all. I ordered a phone. Three weeks later (Christmas got
in the way, I suppose) BT came and connected the phone. The BT
engineer removed the socket in the hall and enabled something so that
all other sockets in the house are enabled. I can access the phone or
plug in a modem via any socket. He intimated that this was an 'extra'
that I'd normally pay 'extra' for, but all he wanted in return was a
cup of tea.

If I get broadband, will I still be able to use any socket either for
phone or broadband?

Where does "master socket" figure in all of this?

Do I have one already? How could I tell?

Somewhere I read that a "central splitter" could be needed to separate
the ADSL signal from the phone signal. Would that apply in my case?
How could I tell?

Is there a novice's guide anywhere on the internet that describes the
whole palaver of converting/connecting to broadband in the UK?

Thanks.

MM



The master socket will be the socket that the incoming wiring is
connected to first, other sockets will be extensions/slaves of this, the
master socket has a capacitor to provide ringing for phones that don't
have their own ringing capacitor, the extensions get their ringing from
being wired to the master (pin 3).

You can use any socket for broadband, though on very ropey lines it
sometimes only reliably works from the master socket.

The filter or as some people call them splitters, just filter the
broadband noise away from the 'speech' side of the line, some call them
splitters as many have a connection for broadband (unfiltered) and a
connection for your phones/fax machine/Sky box (filtered).

You need to use a filter on any socket that has a phone/Sky Box/fax
machine etc on it.


So it will go something like this:

1. I order broadband (e.g. from Zen).

2. Zen sends me an ADSL modem or router, or I buy one separately.

3. In due course the line is converted to ADSL.

4. No BT engineer needs to visit.

5. I install the ADSL modem/router in the room where the PC is and
connect the latter via the new modem to the phone extension socket in
that room.

6. Install software etc...

7. For the phone in the hall I need to obtain a splitter from
somewhere?

8. If I want to connect a second phone in another room I'll need
another splitter.

Is that more or less the procedure?

Thanks.

MM
  #4  
Old August 26th 06, 04:10 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Can someone explain master socket for me?

Thus spaketh MM:
On Sat, 26 Aug 2006 14:35:21 GMT, "{{{{{Welcome}}}}}"
wrote:

Thus spaketh MM:
I moved into this new build property 18 months ago. There was no
phone connection at all. I ordered a phone. Three weeks later
(Christmas got in the way, I suppose) BT came and connected the
phone. The BT engineer removed the socket in the hall and enabled
something so that all other sockets in the house are enabled. I can
access the phone or plug in a modem via any socket. He intimated
that this was an 'extra' that I'd normally pay 'extra' for, but all
he wanted in return was a cup of tea.

If I get broadband, will I still be able to use any socket either
for phone or broadband?

Where does "master socket" figure in all of this?

Do I have one already? How could I tell?

Somewhere I read that a "central splitter" could be needed to
separate the ADSL signal from the phone signal. Would that apply in
my case? How could I tell?

Is there a novice's guide anywhere on the internet that describes
the whole palaver of converting/connecting to broadband in the UK?

Thanks.

MM



The master socket will be the socket that the incoming wiring is
connected to first, other sockets will be extensions/slaves of this,
the master socket has a capacitor to provide ringing for phones that
don't have their own ringing capacitor, the extensions get their
ringing from being wired to the master (pin 3).

You can use any socket for broadband, though on very ropey lines it
sometimes only reliably works from the master socket.

The filter or as some people call them splitters, just filter the
broadband noise away from the 'speech' side of the line, some call
them splitters as many have a connection for broadband (unfiltered)
and a connection for your phones/fax machine/Sky box (filtered).

You need to use a filter on any socket that has a phone/Sky Box/fax
machine etc on it.


So it will go something like this:

1. I order broadband (e.g. from Zen).


Yes

2. Zen sends me an ADSL modem or router, or I buy one separately.


Yes, depending on who you sign up with you will be sent a modem, router
or you buy one.

3. In due course the line is converted to ADSL.


Yes, they just fiddle about at the exchange.


4. No BT engineer needs to visit.


If there are no problems, a BT engineer shouldn't have to visit.

5. I install the ADSL modem/router in the room where the PC is and
connect the latter via the new modem to the phone extension socket in
that room.


Yes, just pop the spliter/filter into the phone socket, you plug your
modem/router into the the RJ11 socket on the filter and the phone if you
wish into the BABT socket on the spliter/filter.


6. Install software etc...


If you are issued with a USB modem then I'd advise only install the
modem drivers, don't bother with any other junk they put on the disc.

If you have a router or Ethernet modem, then don't install any software,
just plug in to ethernet port, switch on and then go into the setup page
of the router to add your unsername and password for your broadband
account.

7. For the phone in the hall I need to obtain a splitter from
somewhere?


Usually you are provided with a couple of filters

8. If I want to connect a second phone in another room I'll need
another splitter.


Yes, they are used to remove any unwanted noise from being heard when
you are on the phone that might be off-putting.

Is that more or less the procedure?


That it is.

Thanks.


No worries.

MM



--
DVD rental: www.southeastbirmingham.co.uk/dvd
PAYG Mobile Offers: www.southeastbirmingham.co.uk/payg
Items for sale: www.dodgy-dealer.co.uk

  #5  
Old August 26th 06, 04:55 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Can someone explain master socket for me?

In message , Alan
wrote
In message , MM
wrote


So it will go something like this:

1. I order broadband (e.g. from Zen).

2. Zen sends me an ADSL modem or router, or I buy one separately.


Yes

http://www.adslguide.org.uk/guide/connections.asp


Sorry that link should have been
http://www.adslguide.org.uk/guide/summary.asp

--
Alan
news2006 {at} amac {dot} f2s {dot} com
  #6  
Old August 26th 06, 05:15 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Can someone explain master socket for me?

Thus spaketh {{{{{Welcome}}}}}:
Thus spaketh MM:
On Sat, 26 Aug 2006 14:35:21 GMT, "{{{{{Welcome}}}}}"
wrote:

Thus spaketh MM:
I moved into this new build property 18 months ago. There was no
phone connection at all. I ordered a phone. Three weeks later
(Christmas got in the way, I suppose) BT came and connected the
phone. The BT engineer removed the socket in the hall and enabled
something so that all other sockets in the house are enabled. I can
access the phone or plug in a modem via any socket. He intimated
that this was an 'extra' that I'd normally pay 'extra' for, but all
he wanted in return was a cup of tea.

If I get broadband, will I still be able to use any socket either
for phone or broadband?

Where does "master socket" figure in all of this?

Do I have one already? How could I tell?

Somewhere I read that a "central splitter" could be needed to
separate the ADSL signal from the phone signal. Would that apply in
my case? How could I tell?

Is there a novice's guide anywhere on the internet that describes
the whole palaver of converting/connecting to broadband in the UK?

Thanks.

MM


The master socket will be the socket that the incoming wiring is
connected to first, other sockets will be extensions/slaves of this,
the master socket has a capacitor to provide ringing for phones that
don't have their own ringing capacitor, the extensions get their
ringing from being wired to the master (pin 3).

You can use any socket for broadband, though on very ropey lines it
sometimes only reliably works from the master socket.

The filter or as some people call them splitters, just filter the
broadband noise away from the 'speech' side of the line, some call
them splitters as many have a connection for broadband (unfiltered)
and a connection for your phones/fax machine/Sky box (filtered).

You need to use a filter on any socket that has a phone/Sky Box/fax
machine etc on it.


So it will go something like this:

1. I order broadband (e.g. from Zen).


Yes

2. Zen sends me an ADSL modem or router, or I buy one separately.


Yes, depending on who you sign up with you will be sent a modem,
router or you buy one.

3. In due course the line is converted to ADSL.


Yes, they just fiddle about at the exchange.


4. No BT engineer needs to visit.


If there are no problems, a BT engineer shouldn't have to visit.

5. I install the ADSL modem/router in the room where the PC is and
connect the latter via the new modem to the phone extension socket in
that room.


Yes, just pop the spliter/filter into the phone socket, you plug your
modem/router into the the RJ11 socket on the filter and the phone if
you wish into the BABT socket on the spliter/filter.


6. Install software etc...


If you are issued with a USB modem then I'd advise only install the
modem drivers, don't bother with any other junk they put on the disc.

If you have a router or Ethernet modem, then don't install any
software, just plug in to ethernet port, switch on and then go into
the setup page of the router to add your unsername and password for
your broadband account.

7. For the phone in the hall I need to obtain a splitter from
somewhere?


Usually you are provided with a couple of filters

8. If I want to connect a second phone in another room I'll need
another splitter.


Yes, they are used to remove any unwanted noise from being heard when
you are on the phone that might be off-putting.

Is that more or less the procedure?


That it is.

Thanks.


No worries.

MM


Just to add, if you can, go down the router route, usb modems are dodgy
at best.

  #7  
Old August 26th 06, 05:46 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Can someone explain master socket for me?

On Sat, 26 Aug 2006 16:55:22 +0100, Alan
wrote:

In message , Alan
wrote
In message , MM
wrote


So it will go something like this:

1. I order broadband (e.g. from Zen).

2. Zen sends me an ADSL modem or router, or I buy one separately.


Yes

http://www.adslguide.org.uk/guide/connections.asp


Sorry that link should have been
http://www.adslguide.org.uk/guide/summary.asp


Ah, interesting! Thanks.

MM
  #8  
Old August 26th 06, 05:59 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Can someone explain master socket for me?

MM wrote:
I moved into this new build property 18 months ago. There was no phone
connection at all. I ordered a phone. Three weeks later (Christmas got
in the way, I suppose) BT came and connected the phone. The BT
engineer removed the socket in the hall and enabled something so that
all other sockets in the house are enabled. I can access the phone or
plug in a modem via any socket. He intimated that this was an 'extra'
that I'd normally pay 'extra' for, but all he wanted in return was a
cup of tea.

If I get broadband, will I still be able to use any socket either for
phone or broadband?

Where does "master socket" figure in all of this?

Do I have one already? How could I tell?

Somewhere I read that a "central splitter" could be needed to separate
the ADSL signal from the phone signal. Would that apply in my case?
How could I tell?

Is there a novice's guide anywhere on the internet that describes the
whole palaver of converting/connecting to broadband in the UK?


Along with the info provided by Welcome and Alan you mjight find the
following links useful:

Master sockets, filters and wiring.

http://www.clarity.it/telecoms/adsl_articles.htm

Note: The Clarity filtered NTE5 faceplate also includes a facility to wire
in ADSL extensions, in addition to phone extensions.

and for an explanation of Max DSL (which is probably what you will receive)

http://www.farina1.com/bookmark/0000...7/00020260.HTM

--
Old Codger
e-mail use reply to field

What matters in politics is not what happens, but what you can make people
believe has happened. [Janet Daley 27/8/2003]


  #9  
Old August 26th 06, 06:46 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Can someone explain master socket for me?


Just to add, if you can, go down the router route, usb modems are dodgy
at best.


FFS don't take him down this route!. He has been given the same advice
many times over in uk.telecom and has ignored it while repeating the same
question over and over again. Good Luck!

Dave
  #10  
Old August 26th 06, 08:08 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Can someone explain master socket for me?

{{{{{Welcome}}}}} wrote:
The master socket will be the socket that the incoming wiring is
connected to first, other sockets will be extensions/slaves of this,
the master socket has a capacitor to provide ringing for phones that
don't have their own ringing capacitor, the extensions get their
ringing from being wired to the master (pin 3).


Of course you are right, but unfortunately, more often than not the
site electricien will install masters (3/1a typically) at all points
for some reason or another & this can often cause problems with the
ADSL. Here again the bell wire by it's very nature (being a longish
length of unbalanced wire) can also cause problems with ADSL, but
let's not go looking for problems which aren't already evident....

You can use any socket for broadband, though on very ropey lines it
sometimes only reliably works from the master socket.


Removing the bell wire & making sure that the extensions are extension
sockets & not master sockets will help more often than not in these
circumstances, as long as the extensions have been run in the
appropiate cable (not burglar alarm cable......yes they do use it as
it's cheaper than telephone cable) & that they haven't used split
pairs.

The filter or as some people call them splitters, just filter the
broadband noise away from the 'speech' side of the line, some call
them splitters as many have a connection for broadband (unfiltered)
and a connection for your phones/fax machine/Sky box (filtered).


They also do have a slight effect on the ADSL side as well, but as I
said it is slight & only occcaisionally will that one rear it's ugly
head...


You need to use a filter on any socket that has a phone/Sky Box/fax
machine etc on it.


& above all make sure that the Burglar alarm company puts a filter on
their feed as close to the master socket as possible (long lengths of
unbalanced stranded, non filtered cable is not good for your ADSL
signal). Even had a case recently where I found an illicit burglar
alarm feed which had been connected to the faceplate (all alarms
should be connected via a Block 80b). The customer wasn't aware of it
& the burglar alarm company stated that the alarm wasn't monitored &
didn't dial out but the fitter had connected it anyway. Remove feed,
ADSL comes up, tests ok & the customer can get on line & then is hit
with a bill because the burglar alarm fitter has cocked it up (it
wasn't the first time either probably won't be the last time as well).


 




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