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uk.comp.home-networking (UK home networking) (uk.comp.home-networking) Discussion of all aspects of computer networking in the home, regardless of the platforms, software, topologies and protocols used. Examples of topics include recommendations for hardware or suppliers (e.g. NICs and cabling), protocols, servers, and specific network software. Advertising is not allowed.

Uplink



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 30th 06, 05:15 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
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Not a problem really, just curiosity. I bought a secondhand 10/100
switch a couple of years ago and used it with a D-Link wireless router
to feed various PCs. The D-Link expired recently and I replaced it
with a Netgear wireless router. Since doing so, however, I can no
longer patch the router to one of the 16 standard ports on the switch:
it /must/ be patched to the "uplink" port. Does this mean that the
uplink port or one of the routers was crossover wired?

  #2  
Old August 30th 06, 06:59 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
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On 30 Aug 2006 09:15:46 -0700, "marvin"
wrote:

Not a problem really, just curiosity. I bought a secondhand 10/100
switch a couple of years ago and used it with a D-Link wireless router
to feed various PCs. The D-Link expired recently and I replaced it
with a Netgear wireless router. Since doing so, however, I can no
longer patch the router to one of the 16 standard ports on the switch:
it /must/ be patched to the "uplink" port. Does this mean that the
uplink port or one of the routers was crossover wired?


Yes.

IME hubs and switches often had a uplink port (or a switchable one)
which did away with the need for a crossover cable.

Robert
Robert
  #4  
Old August 30th 06, 10:17 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
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Default Uplink

marvin wrote:

Interesting. The former router was older but could cope.. the newer
one can't?!


Can you identify the model numbers of both units?
  #5  
Old August 31st 06, 07:55 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
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Default Uplink

On Wed, 30 Aug 2006 22:17:03 +0100, Dougal
DougalAThiskennel.free-online.co.uk wrote:

marvin wrote:

Interesting. The former router was older but could cope.. the newer
one can't?!


Can you identify the model numbers of both units?


My recollection is that it was the older hubs/switches which had
specific "link" ports or switched ones to achieve the crossover.

Soln. buy a crossover cable and make sure you keep it well labelled!
Robert
  #6  
Old August 31st 06, 10:40 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
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Default Uplink

In message . com,
marvin writes
[ X/uplink ports]
Interesting. The former router was older but could cope.. the newer
one can't?!


Some do, some don't. Uplink ports used to be shared. There would be two
sockets on a switch next to each other sharing a single channel, one a
straight-through and the other a crossover. You could use one socket or
the other but not both at the same time. The electronics got smarter and
the uplink socket on a switch became autoswitching, able to detect what
kind of cable and device was connected to it and adapt automatically.
Nowadays even on cheap switches all the sockets will do this
autoswitching.

However doing this adds complexity and reduces reliability to the
switch design and "real" switches don't do this. The switch makers
assume that professionally installed switches will be set up with the
right cables instead of having to work around mistakes by
less-experienced installers.
--
To reply, my gmail address is nojay1 Robert Sneddon
 




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