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uk.comp.home-networking (UK home networking) (uk.comp.home-networking) Discussion of all aspects of computer networking in the home, regardless of the platforms, software, topologies and protocols used. Examples of topics include recommendations for hardware or suppliers (e.g. NICs and cabling), protocols, servers, and specific network software. Advertising is not allowed.

Wired or Wireless



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 1st 06, 01:06 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Paul Sweeney
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Wired or Wireless

I am in the process of adding a major extension to our home and this is the
perfect time to get some cables in the wall if I am going to do it at all.

My question, I have read allot of damning reports about Wireless Networking
and unreliable Routers etc.

Should I go wireless?

Should I install one of the commercially available Home Networking systems?

I have seen a system advertised on eBay (Wiselan)

Advice please..

TIA

Paul


  #2  
Old October 1st 06, 02:04 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Martin Underwood
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 218
Default Wired or Wireless

I am in the process of adding a major extension to our home and this
is the perfect time to get some cables in the wall if I am going to
do it at all.
My question, I have read allot of damning reports about Wireless
Networking and unreliable Routers etc.

Should I go wireless?


My advice is that if you have the choice, wired (Ethernet) is faster, more
secure, more resilient (less prone to intermittent dropouts of service).

I have a laptop with a Netgear WG111T USB adaptor. Usually this performs
flawlessly throughout my house, though it has an annoying habit of locking
the PC (no mouse or keboard caps-lock response) when the PC has been on a
while and the PC and wireless adaptor get hot. When I use the laptop in bed
(OK, I know it's decadent!) I have to have a desk fan blowing air onto the
laptop to prevent it getting hot and the PC locking up. Lockups only occur
if the wireless adaptor is plugged in.

I also tried a Netgear WG511T Cardbus adaptor which was much faster (since
my laptop's USB ports are only USB1) but suffered intermittent outages of
exactly one minute (twelve "no response" lines from a ping -t) despite the
Netgear control app and the Windows computer-and-two-radiating-arcs icon
both indicating good signal strength which each fluctuated slightly over
time, demonstrating that these icons were providing real information, not a
frozen snapshot. Another PC with a built-in wireless adaptor did not
experience these outages when pinging the same router at the same time when
situated right next to my PC. So it's the Netgear card, not the router,
that's at fault.

Wireless is great for low-bandwidth usage (downloading emails, accessing web
sites) from anywhere around the house. However you must be prepared for
intermittent dropouts of service and/or PC lockups, if my experience is
typical. I've also found that even with the laptop right next to the router,
a prolonged tree-structure copy of a 100 MB or so between the laptop and the
desktop PC will sometimes fail part-way through, whereas plugging the laptop
into the Ethernet port of the router always succeeds - and it's much faster
too, which is more of an issue for PC-to-PC access than for internet access
where the ADSL speed rather than the wireless speed is more likely to be the
rate-limiting step.

I'd suggest that you take the opportunity to install one or more LAN points
in the new extension, and maybe plug a wireless access point into one to
provide roaming coverage for a laptop if required, safe in the knowledge
that if you have problems, you can still plug the PC into Ethernet.


  #3  
Old October 1st 06, 02:23 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Mike Scott
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 102
Default Wired or Wireless

Martin Underwood wrote:
I am in the process of adding a major extension to our home and this
is the perfect time to get some cables in the wall if I am going to
do it at all.
My question, I have read allot of damning reports about Wireless
Networking and unreliable Routers etc.

Should I go wireless?


My advice is that if you have the choice, wired (Ethernet) is faster, more
secure, more resilient (less prone to intermittent dropouts of service).


Seconded.

....
I'd suggest that you take the opportunity to install one or more LAN points
in the new extension,


If you do this, provide plenty of wires while it's easy. It's as cheap
to install 2 or 3 lengths in a conduit as one. And don't forget you can
use cat5 as phone extension wiring too.

--
Please use the corrected version of the address below for replies.
Replies to the header address will be junked, as will mail from
various domains listed at www.scottsonline.org.uk
Mike Scott Harlow Essex England.(unet -a-t- scottsonline.org.uk)
  #4  
Old October 1st 06, 02:25 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Dr Zoidberg
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 41
Default Wired or Wireless

I am in the process of adding a major extension to our home and this
is the perfect time to get some cables in the wall if I am going to
do it at all.
My question, I have read allot of damning reports about Wireless
Networking and unreliable Routers etc.

Should I go wireless?

While you have the opportunity to run some cables I'd take it.
Wireless networking is nice and though there can be some problems most
people get it working well.
That said , wired connections are faster , more secure , and you may in
future decide that you want to plug some equipment in that has an ethernet
port but no wireless support - games consoles for example.

If you go wireless only you'll need a wireless bridge for these things which
will be more expense and hassle.


--
Alex

"I laugh in the face of danger. Then I hide until it goes away"

www.drzoidberg.co.uk www.ebayfaq.co.uk


  #5  
Old October 1st 06, 02:37 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Jon
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 666
Default Wired or Wireless

"Paul Sweeney" declared for all the
world to hear...
I am in the process of adding a major extension to our home and this is the
perfect time to get some cables in the wall if I am going to do it at all.

My question, I have read allot of damning reports about Wireless Networking
and unreliable Routers etc.

Should I go wireless?

Should I install one of the commercially available Home Networking systems?

I have seen a system advertised on eBay (Wiselan)

Advice please..


CAT5 if you can! You'll only regret it later!
--
Regards
Jon
  #6  
Old October 1st 06, 02:45 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Paul Sweeney @ntlworld.co>
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Wired or Wireless

Martin Underwood wrote:

I'd suggest that you take the opportunity to install one or more LAN
points in the new extension, and maybe plug a wireless access point
into one to provide roaming coverage for a laptop if required, safe
in the knowledge that if you have problems, you can still plug the PC
into Ethernet.


Many thanks for the replies, so to clarify, the wireless points plug into
the wired points to give a wider range?

The Wiselan system I saw on eBay seems to fit the bill, any comments? (item
no. 220033437971)

Thanks again

Paul



  #7  
Old October 1st 06, 05:23 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
M
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4
Default Wired or Wireless


The Wiselan system I saw on eBay seems to fit the bill, any comments?
(item no. 220033437971)

If you just want to install a computer network then this is probably a bit
over the top. If you want to expand it to cater for AV distribution then
this (with the appropriate expansion kits) is what you need but you need to
wire all the AV points in now.

As the others have suggested - cat 5 cable is the best to go, and if it
turns out that you want to locate a pc away from one of the new wall lan
points, then you can always put a local wireless access point there plugged
into a wall lan point.

This is what I did - put cat 5 across the house, with a wireless router &
switch in the office (one end of the house - wireless wont cover other end
100% as has to run through about 6 solid brick walls). Initially the wall
mounted lan sockets were all in the right place, but as usual - SWMBO
decided to re-arrange the furniture so I put a wireless access point to
cover the area (other end of the house) when I wanted to run wireless.

Also, as stated above, wireless ok for general browsing / email etc, but
whenever I'm doing any work connecting to remote (work) servers, heavy file
work etc, always plug in a cable - much faster and will not drop out.

M.


  #8  
Old October 1st 06, 06:29 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Robert Sneddon
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 11
Default Wired or Wireless

In message , Jon
writes
"Paul Sweeney" declared for all the
world to hear...



Should I install one of the commercially available Home Networking systems?

I have seen a system advertised on eBay (Wiselan)

Advice please..


CAT5 if you can! You'll only regret it later!


I've got a job upcoming to cable a friend's new flat. I'll be running
CAT6 for him as his computers and network servers will be using gigabit
Ethernet. CAT6 wiring means he can upgrade to 10G when or if SOHO kit
becomes available. As others have mentioned, Ethernet wiring will carry
phone signals too. You simply plug in a converter dongle into the RJ45
wall-socket then connect the phone to that.

I'll be putting in a small patch panel in a cupboard that allows
reconfiguring the various wires for phone or computer; this is a bit
more complicated than fixed point-to-point runs but it does allow you to
change things around at a later date more easily.

I recommend you draw up some diagrams where you want to put boxes and
run wires before you start. Conduit strip with a clip-on cover is a
better idea than using nailed cable clips to hold the cable along
skirting boards, especially if you're running two or three cables to the
same place.
--
To reply, my gmail address is nojay1 Robert Sneddon
  #9  
Old October 2nd 06, 04:16 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
tony broughton
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4
Default Wired or Wireless

On 2006-10-01, Paul Sweeney paul.sweeney wrote:
I am in the process of adding a major extension to our home and this is the
perfect time to get some cables in the wall if I am going to do it at all.

My question, I have read allot of damning reports about Wireless Networking
and unreliable Routers etc.

Should I go wireless?

Should I install one of the commercially available Home Networking systems?

I have seen a system advertised on eBay (Wiselan)

Advice please..

TIA

Paul



FWIW my advice is, go for wired, and buy good quality network components,
which mainly means sticking to good brands and avoiding the 50p
realtek adaptors and cheap realtek-based switches. In practice for a home
network that means something like 3com 3c905 nic's or intel pro/100 nics,
and a good SOHO-grade switch like the netgear FS105/8/16 or one of the
3com 8-port officeconnect models (cheap at ebuyer), I'd also recommend the
Planet switches especially 16-port and larger which can be picked up cheap on
ebay and offer good performance for the price, although they do contain
small fans so are not silent. If you wanted to spend a little more you
might consider the HP ProCurve 8-port 10/100 switch which costs about 50-60
retail, it's worth every penny. What you'll get for sticking with good
quality wired components is zero security problems (wireless can have issues),
mature adapter software drivers, and great performance including low latency
and maximum exploitation of the available bandwidth. Personally I'd only use
wireless for something like a laptop outdoors on the lawn where cabling is
inconvenient, but for any serious work I'd choose wired every time.
Speaking of cable, getting some good quality cat-5 or better put in is always
a good policy, there are a lot of very cheap quality cables on the market,
as always you get what you pay for.

Tony
  #10  
Old October 2nd 06, 04:34 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
AP
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7
Default Wired or Wireless

Dare a total IT-ignoramous at least moot the idea that it all depends on
what you want to use it for. If you need to transfer mega-files, and/or have
serious security concerns, then cabling would certainly seem the way to go.
If on the other hand you're basically a domestic user who wants to do a bit
of emailing/webery from around the house, it seems to me that wireless is
certainly worth considering. I got a Belkin ADSL modem & wirless router from
misco for about 40 all in, and a Belkin PCMCIA card from ebay for under a
tenner incl delivery, and got the whole thing up & running in a couple of
hours. And I am, as mentioned earlier, a total numby when it comes to this
kind of thing. Works absolutely fine - does everything I wanted it to do -
no hassle, no unsightly wires. Worth considering, I would've thought.
('Course now I've writ this, it'll probably all go pear-shaped...)
"Paul Sweeney @ntlworld.co" paul.sweeneynospam wrote in message
...
I am in the process of adding a major extension to our home and this is the
perfect time to get some cables in the wall if I am going to do it at all.

My question, I have read allot of damning reports about Wireless
Networking and unreliable Routers etc.

Should I go wireless?

Should I install one of the commercially available Home Networking
systems?

I have seen a system advertised on eBay (Wiselan)

Advice please..

TIA

Paul



 




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