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uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

Options to improve adsl performance



 
 
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  #1  
Old February 28th 07, 12:14 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Options to improve adsl performance

As per many other posters, I have poor realised download speeds on an
8Mb adsl service.

My router (a netgear DG834G) shows sync speed as ~6Mb, DS attenuation
at 30db, but a noise margin of between 1 and 6 db. Noise margin is
occasionally shown as a very large number, which I presume to mean it
has gone negative and the router stats page has a bug(?)

Although my house is only ~10 years old, I cannot locate a master
socket (of either NTE-5 style, or older style - no capacitors behind
the faceplates). Unfortunately, I have recently had a loft conversion
and the BT drop cable (from overhead line) disappears from view (i am
not demolishing the new bedroom/bathroom to get to it!). So I cannot
test a master socket.

I have the router near my PC, plugged into a socket with a dangly adsl
filter to break out a filtered line for my dect phone base. The only
other equipment is a sky box plugged into another socket (with dangly
filter) via a long extension wire. There is another (unused) socket
in the kitchen.

From opening the faceplates, I can see they look to be wired in

series. I can't think of a way of telling which is first (i.e.
nearest the bt drop).

All I've tried so far is replacing the dangly filter with a faceplate
and disconnecting the in and out ring wires from that socket (the one
the router connects to). That had no effect.

I have booked an engineer visit from BT, to install a new master
socket (and possibly one or more extensions). What I'd like is advice
on how to wire up my extensions and what to ask the engineer to do.

I was thinking of getting a master socket installed in the loft, very
close to the point of entry, and using an adslnation NTE-2005 or
similar. From there I have a few choices. 1) Move my router up to the
crawl space in the loft and hooking it up to the network via a spare
ethernet outlet I had installed. [I would need a new ethernet switch
near the PC to patch the other network cables]. The DECT phone base
could also go here, I suppose. The sky box would still need a
(filtered) extension somewhere accessible. 2) Hook up both filtered
and unfiltered pairs to the new master socket and run separate lines
downstairs. Is it possible/advisable to run these over different
pairs on a single cat5/6 cable? I have plenty of cat6 spare and could
run the cable out of site along the route of my other network
cabling. Would the BT engineer be willing or able to do this for me?
Or am I best to just get him to do the master socket and then rewire
extensions myself.

Any advice welcome....

  #2  
Old February 28th 07, 01:36 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
kráftéé
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,765
Default Options to improve adsl performance

wrote:
As per many other posters, I have poor realised download speeds on
an 8Mb adsl service.

My router (a netgear DG834G) shows sync speed as ~6Mb, DS
attenuation at 30db, but a noise margin of between 1 and 6 db.
Noise margin is occasionally shown as a very large number, which I
presume to mean it has gone negative and the router stats page has
a bug(?)


Quite possibly, you have to remember if you are on ADSL MAX the target
SNR will be 6dB unless you convince your ISP to have it raised (I had
mine raised, whilst I was at PN, so the target was 9dB) which could
make your connection more stable

Although my house is only ~10 years old, I cannot locate a master
socket (of either NTE-5 style, or older style - no capacitors behind
the faceplates). Unfortunately, I have recently had a loft
conversion and the BT drop cable (from overhead line) disappears
from view (i am not demolishing the new bedroom/bathroom to get to
it!). So I cannot test a master socket.


OOOOooppps, poor planning there, but you aren't the first & most
deffinitely wont be the last...

I have the router near my PC, plugged into a socket with a dangly
adsl filter to break out a filtered line for my dect phone base.
The only other equipment is a sky box plugged into another socket
(with dangly filter) via a long extension wire. There is another
(unused) socket in the kitchen.

From opening the faceplates, I can see they look to be wired in

series. I can't think of a way of telling which is first (i.e.
nearest the bt drop).

All I've tried so far is replacing the dangly filter with a
faceplate and disconnecting the in and out ring wires from that
socket (the one the router connects to). That had no effect.


You have to do that at the master to be completely covered, anywhere
afterwards may make no difference.

I have booked an engineer visit from BT, to install a new master
socket (and possibly one or more extensions). What I'd like is
advice on how to wire up my extensions and what to ask the engineer
to do.

I was thinking of getting a master socket installed in the loft,
very close to the point of entry, and using an adslnation NTE-2005
or similar.


Some BT engineers will refuse to work in lofts, a lot will depend on
how good the access will be & how easy it is to get around it.
Another question which rears it head is how will he be able to connect
back onto your existing extensions, not unless you are willing to wave
goodby to them.

From there I have a few choices. 1) Move my router up
to the crawl space in the loft and hooking it up to the network via
a spare ethernet outlet I had installed. [I would need a new
ethernet switch near the PC to patch the other network cables].


One BIG problem......heat, it will get extremely hot up there during
any sunny days, how hot will depend on what time of year it is...


The DECT phone base could also go here, I suppose.


Once again heat is your main problem

The sky box
would still need a (filtered) extension somewhere accessible.


If you fit a faceplate filter you will not (normally) require any
other filtering.

2)
Hook up both filtered and unfiltered pairs to the new master socket
and run separate lines downstairs.


ref my first remark are you just going to get the engineer to fit the
master near your loft hatch & not bother with any existing extensions?

Is it possible/advisable to run
these over different pairs on a single cat5/6 cable?


If you believe you may already have a crosstalk problem then use 2
cables, you can use a spare pair in a cat5 cable but you may have
crosstalk.

I have plenty
of cat6 spare and could run the cable out of site along the route
of my other network cabling. Would the BT engineer be willing or
able to do this for me? Or am I best to just get him to do the
master socket and then rewire extensions myself.


You've answered my first point now, yes he may be able but willing
could be another matter, being honest if you know what you're doing &
have a modicum of common sense I would recomend that you do it
yourself, that way it'll be done the way you want it to be.

One thing you haven't stated is what is your synch speed?


  #3  
Old February 28th 07, 03:01 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Eeyore
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,222
Default Options to improve adsl performance



kraftee wrote:

wrote:
As per many other posters, I have poor realised download speeds on
an 8Mb adsl service.

My router (a netgear DG834G) shows sync speed as ~6Mb, DS
attenuation at 30db, but a noise margin of between 1 and 6 db.
Noise margin is occasionally shown as a very large number, which I
presume to mean it has gone negative and the router stats page has
a bug(?)


Quite possibly, you have to remember if you are on ADSL MAX the target
SNR will be 6dB unless you convince your ISP to have it raised (I had
mine raised, whilst I was at PN, so the target was 9dB) which could
make your connection more stable

Although my house is only ~10 years old, I cannot locate a master
socket (of either NTE-5 style, or older style - no capacitors behind
the faceplates). Unfortunately, I have recently had a loft
conversion and the BT drop cable (from overhead line) disappears
from view (i am not demolishing the new bedroom/bathroom to get to
it!). So I cannot test a master socket.


OOOOooppps, poor planning there, but you aren't the first & most
deffinitely wont be the last...

I have the router near my PC, plugged into a socket with a dangly
adsl filter to break out a filtered line for my dect phone base.
The only other equipment is a sky box plugged into another socket
(with dangly filter) via a long extension wire. There is another
(unused) socket in the kitchen.

From opening the faceplates, I can see they look to be wired in

series. I can't think of a way of telling which is first (i.e.
nearest the bt drop).

All I've tried so far is replacing the dangly filter with a
faceplate and disconnecting the in and out ring wires from that
socket (the one the router connects to). That had no effect.


You have to do that at the master to be completely covered, anywhere
afterwards may make no difference.

I have booked an engineer visit from BT, to install a new master
socket (and possibly one or more extensions). What I'd like is
advice on how to wire up my extensions and what to ask the engineer
to do.

I was thinking of getting a master socket installed in the loft,
very close to the point of entry, and using an adslnation NTE-2005
or similar.


Some BT engineers will refuse to work in lofts, a lot will depend on
how good the access will be & how easy it is to get around it.
Another question which rears it head is how will he be able to connect
back onto your existing extensions, not unless you are willing to wave
goodby to them.

From there I have a few choices. 1) Move my router up
to the crawl space in the loft and hooking it up to the network via
a spare ethernet outlet I had installed. [I would need a new
ethernet switch near the PC to patch the other network cables].


One BIG problem......heat, it will get extremely hot up there during
any sunny days, how hot will depend on what time of year it is...

The DECT phone base could also go here, I suppose.


Once again heat is your main problem

The sky box
would still need a (filtered) extension somewhere accessible.


If you fit a faceplate filter you will not (normally) require any
other filtering.

2)
Hook up both filtered and unfiltered pairs to the new master socket
and run separate lines downstairs.


ref my first remark are you just going to get the engineer to fit the
master near your loft hatch & not bother with any existing extensions?

Is it possible/advisable to run
these over different pairs on a single cat5/6 cable?


If you believe you may already have a crosstalk problem then use 2
cables, you can use a spare pair in a cat5 cable but you may have
crosstalk.

I have plenty
of cat6 spare and could run the cable out of site along the route
of my other network cabling. Would the BT engineer be willing or
able to do this for me? Or am I best to just get him to do the
master socket and then rewire extensions myself.


You've answered my first point now, yes he may be able but willing
could be another matter, being honest if you know what you're doing &
have a modicum of common sense I would recomend that you do it
yourself, that way it'll be done the way you want it to be.

One thing you haven't stated is what is your synch speed?


" My router (a netgear DG834G) shows sync speed as ~6Mb, " !

Graham

  #4  
Old February 28th 07, 03:45 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Alec
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 14
Default Options to improve adsl performance

If your sync speed is 6 meg you are not going to get much better are you?

How far are you from the exchange?

Alec
wrote in message
oups.com...
As per many other posters, I have poor realised download speeds on an
8Mb adsl service.

My router (a netgear DG834G) shows sync speed as ~6Mb, DS attenuation
at 30db, but a noise margin of between 1 and 6 db. Noise margin is
occasionally shown as a very large number, which I presume to mean it
has gone negative and the router stats page has a bug(?)

Although my house is only ~10 years old, I cannot locate a master
socket (of either NTE-5 style, or older style - no capacitors behind
the faceplates). Unfortunately, I have recently had a loft conversion
and the BT drop cable (from overhead line) disappears from view (i am
not demolishing the new bedroom/bathroom to get to it!). So I cannot
test a master socket.

I have the router near my PC, plugged into a socket with a dangly adsl
filter to break out a filtered line for my dect phone base. The only
other equipment is a sky box plugged into another socket (with dangly
filter) via a long extension wire. There is another (unused) socket
in the kitchen.

From opening the faceplates, I can see they look to be wired in

series. I can't think of a way of telling which is first (i.e.
nearest the bt drop).

All I've tried so far is replacing the dangly filter with a faceplate
and disconnecting the in and out ring wires from that socket (the one
the router connects to). That had no effect.

I have booked an engineer visit from BT, to install a new master
socket (and possibly one or more extensions). What I'd like is advice
on how to wire up my extensions and what to ask the engineer to do.

I was thinking of getting a master socket installed in the loft, very
close to the point of entry, and using an adslnation NTE-2005 or
similar. From there I have a few choices. 1) Move my router up to the
crawl space in the loft and hooking it up to the network via a spare
ethernet outlet I had installed. [I would need a new ethernet switch
near the PC to patch the other network cables]. The DECT phone base
could also go here, I suppose. The sky box would still need a
(filtered) extension somewhere accessible. 2) Hook up both filtered
and unfiltered pairs to the new master socket and run separate lines
downstairs. Is it possible/advisable to run these over different
pairs on a single cat5/6 cable? I have plenty of cat6 spare and could
run the cable out of site along the route of my other network
cabling. Would the BT engineer be willing or able to do this for me?
Or am I best to just get him to do the master socket and then rewire
extensions myself.

Any advice welcome....



  #5  
Old February 28th 07, 04:15 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
kráftéé
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,765
Default Options to improve adsl performance

Eeyore wrote:
kraftee wrote:

wrote:
As per many other posters, I have poor realised download speeds on
an 8Mb adsl service.

My router (a netgear DG834G) shows sync speed as ~6Mb, DS
attenuation at 30db, but a noise margin of between 1 and 6 db.
Noise margin is occasionally shown as a very large number, which I
presume to mean it has gone negative and the router stats page has
a bug(?)


Quite possibly, you have to remember if you are on ADSL MAX the
target SNR will be 6dB unless you convince your ISP to have it
raised (I had mine raised, whilst I was at PN, so the target was
9dB) which could make your connection more stable

Although my house is only ~10 years old, I cannot locate a master
socket (of either NTE-5 style, or older style - no capacitors
behind the faceplates). Unfortunately, I have recently had a loft
conversion and the BT drop cable (from overhead line) disappears
from view (i am not demolishing the new bedroom/bathroom to get to
it!). So I cannot test a master socket.


OOOOooppps, poor planning there, but you aren't the first & most
deffinitely wont be the last...

I have the router near my PC, plugged into a socket with a dangly
adsl filter to break out a filtered line for my dect phone base.
The only other equipment is a sky box plugged into another socket
(with dangly filter) via a long extension wire. There is another
(unused) socket in the kitchen.

From opening the faceplates, I can see they look to be wired in
series. I can't think of a way of telling which is first (i.e.
nearest the bt drop).

All I've tried so far is replacing the dangly filter with a
faceplate and disconnecting the in and out ring wires from that
socket (the one the router connects to). That had no effect.


You have to do that at the master to be completely covered,
anywhere afterwards may make no difference.

I have booked an engineer visit from BT, to install a new master
socket (and possibly one or more extensions). What I'd like is
advice on how to wire up my extensions and what to ask the
engineer to do.

I was thinking of getting a master socket installed in the loft,
very close to the point of entry, and using an adslnation NTE-2005
or similar.


Some BT engineers will refuse to work in lofts, a lot will depend
on how good the access will be & how easy it is to get around it.
Another question which rears it head is how will he be able to
connect back onto your existing extensions, not unless you are
willing to wave goodby to them.

From there I have a few choices. 1) Move my router up
to the crawl space in the loft and hooking it up to the network
via a spare ethernet outlet I had installed. [I would need a new
ethernet switch near the PC to patch the other network cables].


One BIG problem......heat, it will get extremely hot up there
during any sunny days, how hot will depend on what time of year it
is...

The DECT phone base could also go here, I suppose.


Once again heat is your main problem

The sky box
would still need a (filtered) extension somewhere accessible.


If you fit a faceplate filter you will not (normally) require any
other filtering.

2)
Hook up both filtered and unfiltered pairs to the new master
socket and run separate lines downstairs.


ref my first remark are you just going to get the engineer to fit
the master near your loft hatch & not bother with any existing
extensions?

Is it possible/advisable to run
these over different pairs on a single cat5/6 cable?


If you believe you may already have a crosstalk problem then use 2
cables, you can use a spare pair in a cat5 cable but you may have
crosstalk.

I have plenty
of cat6 spare and could run the cable out of site along the route
of my other network cabling. Would the BT engineer be willing or
able to do this for me? Or am I best to just get him to do the
master socket and then rewire extensions myself.


You've answered my first point now, yes he may be able but willing
could be another matter, being honest if you know what you're
doing & have a modicum of common sense I would recomend that you
do it yourself, that way it'll be done the way you want it to be.

One thing you haven't stated is what is your synch speed?


" My router (a netgear DG834G) shows sync speed as ~6Mb, " !

Graham


Missed that line, wonder if the OP thinks it's worth the £120+ & all
the extra work he is going to have to put in to get that extra 1.5Mb,
anyway my original reply is still of some worth....


  #6  
Old February 28th 07, 04:24 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Bob Smith
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default Options to improve adsl performance


wrote in message
oups.com...
As per many other posters, I have poor realised download speeds on an
8Mb adsl service.

My router (a netgear DG834G) shows sync speed as ~6Mb, DS attenuation
at 30db, but a noise margin of between 1 and 6 db. Noise margin is
occasionally shown as a very large number, which I presume to mean it
has gone negative and the router stats page has a bug(?)

Although my house is only ~10 years old, I cannot locate a master
socket (of either NTE-5 style, or older style - no capacitors behind
the faceplates). Unfortunately, I have recently had a loft conversion
and the BT drop cable (from overhead line) disappears from view (i am
not demolishing the new bedroom/bathroom to get to it!). So I cannot
test a master socket.

I have the router near my PC, plugged into a socket with a dangly adsl
filter to break out a filtered line for my dect phone base. The only
other equipment is a sky box plugged into another socket (with dangly
filter) via a long extension wire. There is another (unused) socket
in the kitchen.

From opening the faceplates, I can see they look to be wired in

series. I can't think of a way of telling which is first (i.e.
nearest the bt drop).

All I've tried so far is replacing the dangly filter with a faceplate
and disconnecting the in and out ring wires from that socket (the one
the router connects to). That had no effect.

I have booked an engineer visit from BT, to install a new master
socket (and possibly one or more extensions). What I'd like is advice
on how to wire up my extensions and what to ask the engineer to do.

I was thinking of getting a master socket installed in the loft, very
close to the point of entry, and using an adslnation NTE-2005 or
similar. From there I have a few choices. 1) Move my router up to the
crawl space in the loft and hooking it up to the network via a spare
ethernet outlet I had installed. [I would need a new ethernet switch
near the PC to patch the other network cables]. The DECT phone base
could also go here, I suppose. The sky box would still need a
(filtered) extension somewhere accessible. 2) Hook up both filtered
and unfiltered pairs to the new master socket and run separate lines
downstairs. Is it possible/advisable to run these over different
pairs on a single cat5/6 cable? I have plenty of cat6 spare and could
run the cable out of site along the route of my other network
cabling. Would the BT engineer be willing or able to do this for me?
Or am I best to just get him to do the master socket and then rewire
extensions myself.

Any advice welcome....


Don't use Cat5 cable for line extensions, I've tried it and it was a
disaster. A cheap flat extension cable was superior for BB.

Probably due to the incorrect impedance (Cat 5 is 100ohm and line wiring
cable is 600 ohm)

Bob S


  #7  
Old February 28th 07, 04:28 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
DodgyDunk
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3
Default Options to improve adsl performance

On 28 Feb, 15:45, "Alec" wrote:
If your sync speed is 6 meg you are not going to get much better are you?

AFAIK, Sync speed being 6 Mb does not necessarily translate to
download speeds of anywhere near that, because the poor noise margin
causes many errors and eventually dropped sync.

It's the stability that's more of an issue. And, being a bit geeky, I
want the best set-up I can!

How far are you from the exchange?

No idea (or if it's in a straight line). My attenuation figure of
30db seems to indicate that 5-6Mb is attainable.

  #8  
Old February 28th 07, 05:02 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Eeyore
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,222
Default Options to improve adsl performance



Bob Smith wrote:

wrote in message

As per many other posters, I have poor realised download speeds on an
8Mb adsl service.

My router (a netgear DG834G) shows sync speed as ~6Mb, DS attenuation
at 30db, but a noise margin of between 1 and 6 db. Noise margin is
occasionally shown as a very large number, which I presume to mean it
has gone negative and the router stats page has a bug(?)

Although my house is only ~10 years old, I cannot locate a master
socket (of either NTE-5 style, or older style - no capacitors behind
the faceplates). Unfortunately, I have recently had a loft conversion
and the BT drop cable (from overhead line) disappears from view (i am
not demolishing the new bedroom/bathroom to get to it!). So I cannot
test a master socket.

I have the router near my PC, plugged into a socket with a dangly adsl
filter to break out a filtered line for my dect phone base. The only
other equipment is a sky box plugged into another socket (with dangly
filter) via a long extension wire. There is another (unused) socket
in the kitchen.

From opening the faceplates, I can see they look to be wired in

series. I can't think of a way of telling which is first (i.e.
nearest the bt drop).

All I've tried so far is replacing the dangly filter with a faceplate
and disconnecting the in and out ring wires from that socket (the one
the router connects to). That had no effect.

I have booked an engineer visit from BT, to install a new master
socket (and possibly one or more extensions). What I'd like is advice
on how to wire up my extensions and what to ask the engineer to do.

I was thinking of getting a master socket installed in the loft, very
close to the point of entry, and using an adslnation NTE-2005 or
similar. From there I have a few choices. 1) Move my router up to the
crawl space in the loft and hooking it up to the network via a spare
ethernet outlet I had installed. [I would need a new ethernet switch
near the PC to patch the other network cables]. The DECT phone base
could also go here, I suppose. The sky box would still need a
(filtered) extension somewhere accessible. 2) Hook up both filtered
and unfiltered pairs to the new master socket and run separate lines
downstairs. Is it possible/advisable to run these over different
pairs on a single cat5/6 cable? I have plenty of cat6 spare and could
run the cable out of site along the route of my other network
cabling. Would the BT engineer be willing or able to do this for me?
Or am I best to just get him to do the master socket and then rewire
extensions myself.

Any advice welcome....


Don't use Cat5 cable for line extensions, I've tried it and it was a
disaster. A cheap flat extension cable was superior for BB.

Probably due to the incorrect impedance (Cat 5 is 100ohm and line wiring
cable is 600 ohm)


Where do you get the 600 ohms from ? I'll bet you it isn't.

Graham

  #9  
Old February 28th 07, 05:19 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Bob Smith
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default Options to improve adsl performance


"Eeyore" wrote in message
...


Bob Smith wrote:

wrote in message

As per many other posters, I have poor realised download speeds on an
8Mb adsl service.

My router (a netgear DG834G) shows sync speed as ~6Mb, DS attenuation
at 30db, but a noise margin of between 1 and 6 db. Noise margin is
occasionally shown as a very large number, which I presume to mean it
has gone negative and the router stats page has a bug(?)

Although my house is only ~10 years old, I cannot locate a master
socket (of either NTE-5 style, or older style - no capacitors behind
the faceplates). Unfortunately, I have recently had a loft conversion
and the BT drop cable (from overhead line) disappears from view (i am
not demolishing the new bedroom/bathroom to get to it!). So I cannot
test a master socket.

I have the router near my PC, plugged into a socket with a dangly adsl
filter to break out a filtered line for my dect phone base. The only
other equipment is a sky box plugged into another socket (with dangly
filter) via a long extension wire. There is another (unused) socket
in the kitchen.

From opening the faceplates, I can see they look to be wired in
series. I can't think of a way of telling which is first (i.e.
nearest the bt drop).

All I've tried so far is replacing the dangly filter with a faceplate
and disconnecting the in and out ring wires from that socket (the one
the router connects to). That had no effect.

I have booked an engineer visit from BT, to install a new master
socket (and possibly one or more extensions). What I'd like is advice
on how to wire up my extensions and what to ask the engineer to do.

I was thinking of getting a master socket installed in the loft, very
close to the point of entry, and using an adslnation NTE-2005 or
similar. From there I have a few choices. 1) Move my router up to the
crawl space in the loft and hooking it up to the network via a spare
ethernet outlet I had installed. [I would need a new ethernet switch
near the PC to patch the other network cables]. The DECT phone base
could also go here, I suppose. The sky box would still need a
(filtered) extension somewhere accessible. 2) Hook up both filtered
and unfiltered pairs to the new master socket and run separate lines
downstairs. Is it possible/advisable to run these over different
pairs on a single cat5/6 cable? I have plenty of cat6 spare and could
run the cable out of site along the route of my other network
cabling. Would the BT engineer be willing or able to do this for me?
Or am I best to just get him to do the master socket and then rewire
extensions myself.

Any advice welcome....


Don't use Cat5 cable for line extensions, I've tried it and it was a
disaster. A cheap flat extension cable was superior for BB.

Probably due to the incorrect impedance (Cat 5 is 100ohm and line wiring
cable is 600 ohm)


Where do you get the 600 ohms from ? I'll bet you it isn't.

Graham


600 ohms is well known as the characteristic impedance of BT lines and has
been for many years.

Bob S


  #10  
Old February 28th 07, 07:33 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Alec
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Default Options to improve adsl performance

The 600 ohm figure is that achieved by the older open wire systems on
telegraph poles.

The modern twisted pairs will be nearer 100 ohm.

Alec


"Bob Smith" wrote in message
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"Eeyore" wrote in message
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Bob Smith wrote:

wrote in message

As per many other posters, I have poor realised download speeds on an
8Mb adsl service.

My router (a netgear DG834G) shows sync speed as ~6Mb, DS attenuation
at 30db, but a noise margin of between 1 and 6 db. Noise margin is
occasionally shown as a very large number, which I presume to mean it
has gone negative and the router stats page has a bug(?)

Although my house is only ~10 years old, I cannot locate a master
socket (of either NTE-5 style, or older style - no capacitors behind
the faceplates). Unfortunately, I have recently had a loft conversion
and the BT drop cable (from overhead line) disappears from view (i am
not demolishing the new bedroom/bathroom to get to it!). So I cannot
test a master socket.

I have the router near my PC, plugged into a socket with a dangly adsl
filter to break out a filtered line for my dect phone base. The only
other equipment is a sky box plugged into another socket (with dangly
filter) via a long extension wire. There is another (unused) socket
in the kitchen.

From opening the faceplates, I can see they look to be wired in
series. I can't think of a way of telling which is first (i.e.
nearest the bt drop).

All I've tried so far is replacing the dangly filter with a faceplate
and disconnecting the in and out ring wires from that socket (the one
the router connects to). That had no effect.

I have booked an engineer visit from BT, to install a new master
socket (and possibly one or more extensions). What I'd like is advice
on how to wire up my extensions and what to ask the engineer to do.

I was thinking of getting a master socket installed in the loft, very
close to the point of entry, and using an adslnation NTE-2005 or
similar. From there I have a few choices. 1) Move my router up to the
crawl space in the loft and hooking it up to the network via a spare
ethernet outlet I had installed. [I would need a new ethernet switch
near the PC to patch the other network cables]. The DECT phone base
could also go here, I suppose. The sky box would still need a
(filtered) extension somewhere accessible. 2) Hook up both filtered
and unfiltered pairs to the new master socket and run separate lines
downstairs. Is it possible/advisable to run these over different
pairs on a single cat5/6 cable? I have plenty of cat6 spare and could
run the cable out of site along the route of my other network
cabling. Would the BT engineer be willing or able to do this for me?
Or am I best to just get him to do the master socket and then rewire
extensions myself.

Any advice welcome....

Don't use Cat5 cable for line extensions, I've tried it and it was a
disaster. A cheap flat extension cable was superior for BB.

Probably due to the incorrect impedance (Cat 5 is 100ohm and line wiring
cable is 600 ohm)


Where do you get the 600 ohms from ? I'll bet you it isn't.

Graham


600 ohms is well known as the characteristic impedance of BT lines and has
been for many years.

Bob S



 




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