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uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

Credit card fraud



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 19th 07, 01:03 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Graham
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 153
Default Credit card fraud

I recently send an email to a small hotel in France quoting my credit card
details as a deposit. On the same day that I sent these details, there was
a fraudulent transaction on my credit card, billing $19.99 to
Blizzard-Enterprises. The credit card company cannot tell me what time the
fraudulent transaction took place.

Google shows that Blizzard-Enterprises are commonly associated with this
sort of fraud.

Is it likely that the email itself (sent via Demon) was the source of the
fraud?

Does anybody here have any experience of this?

--
Graham J


  #2  
Old May 19th 07, 01:06 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
SteveH
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 52
Default Credit card fraud

Graham wrote:

I recently send an email to a small hotel in France quoting my credit card
details as a deposit. On the same day that I sent these details, there was
a fraudulent transaction on my credit card, billing $19.99 to
Blizzard-Enterprises. The credit card company cannot tell me what time the
fraudulent transaction took place.

Google shows that Blizzard-Enterprises are commonly associated with this
sort of fraud.

Is it likely that the email itself (sent via Demon) was the source of the
fraud?

Does anybody here have any experience of this?


No - but I thought everyone knew not to send credit card details via
email.


--
SteveH 'You're not a real petrolhead unless you've owned an Alfa Romeo'
www.italiancar.co.uk - Honda VFR800 - Hongdou GY200 - Alfa 75 TSpark
Alfa 156 TSpark - B6 Passat 2.0TDI SE - COSOC KOTL
BOTAFOT #87 - BOTAFOF #18 - MRO # - UKRMSBC #7 - Apostle #2 - YTC #
  #3  
Old May 19th 07, 02:24 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Eeyore
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,222
Default Credit card fraud



Graham wrote:

I recently send an email to a small hotel in France quoting my credit card
details as a deposit.


You won't do that again will you ?

Graham

  #4  
Old May 19th 07, 03:09 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 529
Default Credit card fraud


On 19-May-2007, "Graham" wrote:

Is it likely that the email itself (sent via Demon) was the source of the
fraud?


Unlikely that they are monitoring all their users emails 24/7 on the
off chance of getting hold of credit card details.
Could be your PC has a keylogger planted that emails keystrokes,
or possibly a rogue employee at the hotel.
I'm surprised that the credit card companies have not set up
a PayPal, or Google Pay, type of system. Then the payee
never gets to see your card details.

A local restaurant has been skimming cards, also petrol
stations, Heathrow Express machines. You buy a s/h PC
at a commercial effects auction, it's from a firm that's
gone bust, full of credit card details (name, address,
phone number) and verification
numbers. Give your card details to anyone and it's
potentially compromised.
I only buy on line from those who take PayPal, and
don't shop at TKmax.

  #5  
Old May 19th 07, 03:51 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
It's Me
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 219
Default Credit card fraud

Hate to say it but your own fault.


  #6  
Old May 19th 07, 03:55 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
stephen
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 381
Default Credit card fraud

wrote in message
...

On 19-May-2007, "Graham" wrote:

Is it likely that the email itself (sent via Demon) was the source of

the
fraud?


Unlikely that they are monitoring all their users emails 24/7 on the
off chance of getting hold of credit card details.
Could be your PC has a keylogger planted that emails keystrokes,
or possibly a rogue employee at the hotel.
I'm surprised that the credit card companies have not set up
a PayPal, or Google Pay, type of system. Then the payee
never gets to see your card details.

A local restaurant has been skimming cards, also petrol
stations, Heathrow Express machines. You buy a s/h PC
at a commercial effects auction, it's from a firm that's
gone bust, full of credit card details (name, address,
phone number) and verification
numbers. Give your card details to anyone and it's
potentially compromised.
I only buy on line from those who take PayPal, and
don't shop at TKmax.


i had my credit card info put on a spoof Paypal account 2 months ago - still
not got all the money back......

--
Regards

- replace xyz with ntl


  #7  
Old May 19th 07, 04:51 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Keith Willcocks
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 70
Default Credit card fraud


"Graham" wrote in message
...
I recently send an email to a small hotel in France quoting my credit card
details as a deposit. On the same day that I sent these details, there was
a fraudulent transaction on my credit card, billing $19.99 to
Blizzard-Enterprises. The credit card company cannot tell me what time the
fraudulent transaction took place.

Google shows that Blizzard-Enterprises are commonly associated with this
sort of fraud.

Is it likely that the email itself (sent via Demon) was the source of the
fraud?

Does anybody here have any experience of this?



I recently had no choice but to send credit card details to the States. I
took the precaution of putting the details in a Word document which I then
password protected. The password was sent in one email and the Word
document was attached to a second one which was sent a bit later. Not
foolproof but safer than a straight email bearing all.
--
Keith Willcocks
(If you can't laugh at life, it ain't worth living!)


  #8  
Old May 19th 07, 05:14 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 529
Default Credit card fraud


On 19-May-2007, "stephen" wrote:

i had my credit card info put on a spoof Paypal account 2 months ago - still
not got all the money back......


But your credit card details were compromised first, then used to
create the PayPal account, and presumably an Unverified
PayPal account which has limits until it becomes verified.
  #9  
Old May 19th 07, 05:35 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Jay L. T. Cornwall
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 21
Default Credit card fraud

Keith Willcocks wrote:

I recently had no choice but to send credit card details to the States. I
took the precaution of putting the details in a Word document which I then
password protected. The password was sent in one email and the Word
document was attached to a second one which was sent a bit later. Not
foolproof but safer than a straight email bearing all.


If the recipient has some technical knowhow, GPG is perfect for
transmitting sensitive information. I hooked up Enigmail to my
Thunderbird client and nowadays send all emails signed; sensitive ones
encrypted as well. By defaulting to signed email, there's some
additional protection from impersonation.

The only downside is that most of the PGP keyservers seem to be in a
state of permanent semi-brokenness, so I just link to the public key on
my website.

--
Jay L. T. Cornwall, http://www.esuna.co.uk/~jay/
PhD Student
Imperial College London
  #10  
Old May 19th 07, 06:56 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
John
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 38
Default Credit card fraud


"Graham" wrote in message
...
I recently send an email to a small hotel in France quoting my credit card
details as a deposit. On the same day that I sent these details, there was
a fraudulent transaction on my credit card, billing $19.99 to
Blizzard-Enterprises. The credit card company cannot tell me what time the
fraudulent transaction took place.

Google shows that Blizzard-Enterprises are commonly associated with this
sort of fraud.

Is it likely that the email itself (sent via Demon) was the source of the
fraud?

Does anybody here have any experience of this?


Emails are not encrypted. Anything in an email is sent as clear text and if
anyone is sniffing your packets (Oo'er missus )) your credit card details
are there in plain sight, waiting to be abused.

John


 




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