A Broadband and ADSL forum. BroadbanterBanter

Welcome to BroadbanterBanter.

You are currently viewing as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions and other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today.

Go Back   Home » BroadbanterBanter forum » Newsgroup Discussions » uk.telecom.voip (UK VOIP)
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

uk.telecom.voip (UK VOIP) (uk.telecom.voip) Discussion of topics relevant to packet based voice technologies including Voice over IP (VoIP), Fax over IP (FoIP), Voice over Frame Relay (VoFR), Voice over Broadband (VoB) and Voice on the Net (VoN) as well as service providers, hardware and software for use with these technologies. Advertising is not allowed.

Telephone over the Internet



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old July 1st 07, 07:29 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Bill Ridgeway
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 114
Default Telephone over the Internet

The following was originally posted to uk.telecom.broadband and I was
advised that this is the appropriate NG.

I am thinking of switching my telephone access to the Internet (VOIP). I
have a wireless router and adapter. However, before making the jump -

Am I correct in presuming I would need a special phone to could connect
wirelessly (I couldn't use my existing phone)?
Am I correct in presuming the computer would have to be on 24/7?
What would happen to incoming calls if the computer was not on?
Is there an appreciable time in delay in two-way speech?
Are there any other advantages (other than cost) / disadvantages?
How reliable is VOIP?
Does VOIP suffer from traffic / congestion problems?
Is there a source of information for beginners?

Whilst VOIP is included in the monthly bill it appears to be 'free' -
although, in reality, it is paid for. I don't want to fall into the trap of
having a low cost / low reliability service.

Thanks.

Bill Ridgeway


  #2  
Old July 1st 07, 07:40 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Paul Cupis
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 802
Default Telephone over the Internet

Bill Ridgeway wrote:
Am I correct in presuming I would need a special phone to could connect
wirelessly (I couldn't use my existing phone)?


You can continue to use your existing phone if you buy/use an "Analogue
Telephone Adapter" (ATA) - you plug your phone into this and plug the
ATA into your ADSL router or similar. Depending on the ATA, you can also
plug it into your telephone line and have all incoming calls go through
it to your "normal" telephone.

Am I correct in presuming the computer would have to be on 24/7?


Not if using an ATA, as this contains enough computer to connect to your
VoIP supplier. If you are using VoIP software on your computer or an
ADSL modem instead of router, then your computer would have to be on to
make/receive calls.

What would happen to incoming calls if the computer was not on?


Depends on what you want to happen. Calls could be cleared as
unavailable or engaged, or you could have incoming calls go to voicemail
or similar.

Is there an appreciable time in delay in two-way speech?
How reliable is VOIP?
Does VOIP suffer from traffic / congestion problems?


Typically the above is all reliant on the speed/quality of your internet
connection, as opposed to anything to do with the actual VoIP service.

Are there any other advantages (other than cost) / disadvantages?


Additional services, easy/cheap number routing, the ability to take your
number/calls to another location if it has an internet connection.

Whilst VOIP is included in the monthly bill it appears to be 'free' -
although, in reality, it is paid for. I don't want to fall into the trap of
having a low cost / low reliability service.


This sounds like you are planning on taking up a VoIP service with your
ISP? What happens if you want to change your ISP?
  #3  
Old July 1st 07, 08:43 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Ivor Jones
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,969
Default Telephone over the Internet



"Bill Ridgeway" wrote in message

The following was originally posted to
uk.telecom.broadband and I was advised that this is the
appropriate NG.
I am thinking of switching my telephone access to the
Internet (VOIP). I have a wireless router and adapter. However, before
making the jump -
Am I correct in presuming I would need a special phone to
could connect wirelessly (I couldn't use my existing
phone)?


No, you can use an existing phone. It depends whether you want to use the
same phone for all calls or whether you want a separate phone for the
additional number (easier IMHO).

Am I correct in presuming the computer would have to be
on 24/7?


No, use an ATA (Analogue Telephone Adaptor).

What would happen to incoming calls if the computer was
not on?


See above.

Is there an appreciable time in delay in two-way speech?


Not in my experience.

Are there any other advantages (other than cost) /
disadvantages?


It's just like using a normal phone.

How reliable is VOIP?


Depends on several things - your ISP (do you get much downtime) or the
VoIP provider (some are better than others).

Does VOIP suffer from traffic / congestion problems?


If you mean does it suffer if the broadband connection is being heavily
used, then yes it can. Get a router with QoS (Quality of Service) - this
will prioritise the VoIP traffic.

Is there a source of information for beginners?


There are several, but like anything on the internet, how accurate it is
depends on a lot of things ;-)

Whilst VOIP is included in the monthly bill it appears to
be 'free' - although, in reality, it is paid for.


I don't understand this.

I don't want to fall into the trap of having a low cost /
low reliability service.



Ivor


  #4  
Old July 1st 07, 10:16 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Graham
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 188
Default Telephone over the Internet


"Bill Ridgeway" wrote in message
...
The following was originally posted to uk.telecom.broadband and I was
advised that this is the appropriate NG.

I am thinking of switching my telephone access to the Internet (VOIP). I
have a wireless router and adapter. However, before making the jump -




We don't know what you mean by an "adapter" is it an analogue telephone

adapter (ATA), tell us the make and model.



Am I correct in presuming I would need a special phone to could connect
wirelessly (I couldn't use my existing phone)?


There are special wifi and Ethernet IP phones, but I wouldn't recommend

you take that route. Use an ATA plugged into your router and an

any ordinary phone (including cordless) plugged into the ATA





Am I correct in presuming the computer would have to be on 24/7?


Only if you use an on-screen "softphone" you I hope will be using
the hardware I mentioned above, so your presumption is incorrect.

What would happen to incoming calls if the computer was not on?


N/A !

Is there an appreciable time in delay in two-way speech?


Barely perceivable.

Are there any other advantages (other than cost) / disadvantages?


How reliable is VOIP?


Very. Budget services which we will no doubt recommend to you here

won't have any access to emergency services, so have a suitable alternative

means to make a call available.



Does VOIP suffer from traffic / congestion problems?


Occasionally if my son is using peer - peer software and saturating my
upload

bandwidth. It hasn't happened for a long while though.A better router with

QoS would probably stop that ever happening.

Is there a source of information for beginners?


You are welcome to ask whatever you want on this Group,
most of us don't bite.

Whilst VOIP is included in the monthly bill it appears to be 'free' -
although, in reality, it is paid for. I don't want to fall into the trap
of
having a low cost / low reliability service.


Are you looking at something like BT-BBV? Think again.

Look, for example at www.sipgate.co.uk this has the advantage that
a single account will do outgoing and incoming calls and you
get a phone number; a real geographic phone number for practically
any STD code in the UK.

--
Graham.
%Profound_observation%


  #5  
Old July 1st 07, 10:52 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Bob Templeman
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8
Default Telephone over the Internet

I personally use a rotary dial heritage phone - 200 series with bell set -
via a pulse to tone sandman box plugged into my Voyager 2500V router. Only
the router needs to be switched on to provide the phone service. I have not
detected any significant difference in quality of service.
Bob T
"Ivor Jones" wrote in message
...


"Bill Ridgeway" wrote in message

The following was originally posted to
uk.telecom.broadband and I was advised that this is the
appropriate NG.
I am thinking of switching my telephone access to the
Internet (VOIP). I have a wireless router and adapter. However, before
making the jump -
Am I correct in presuming I would need a special phone to
could connect wirelessly (I couldn't use my existing
phone)?


No, you can use an existing phone. It depends whether you want to use the
same phone for all calls or whether you want a separate phone for the
additional number (easier IMHO).

Am I correct in presuming the computer would have to be
on 24/7?


No, use an ATA (Analogue Telephone Adaptor).

What would happen to incoming calls if the computer was
not on?


See above.

Is there an appreciable time in delay in two-way speech?


Not in my experience.

Are there any other advantages (other than cost) /
disadvantages?


It's just like using a normal phone.

How reliable is VOIP?


Depends on several things - your ISP (do you get much downtime) or the
VoIP provider (some are better than others).

Does VOIP suffer from traffic / congestion problems?


If you mean does it suffer if the broadband connection is being heavily
used, then yes it can. Get a router with QoS (Quality of Service) - this
will prioritise the VoIP traffic.

Is there a source of information for beginners?


There are several, but like anything on the internet, how accurate it is
depends on a lot of things ;-)

Whilst VOIP is included in the monthly bill it appears to
be 'free' - although, in reality, it is paid for.


I don't understand this.

I don't want to fall into the trap of having a low cost /
low reliability service.



Ivor





  #6  
Old July 2nd 07, 07:15 AM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Herman
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 100
Default Telephone over the Internet

"Graham" wrote in message
...

Look, for example at www.sipgate.co.uk this has the advantage that
a single account will do outgoing and incoming calls and you
get a phone number; a real geographic phone number for practically
any STD code in the UK.


If you have already got an unlocked ATA (Analogue Telephone Adapter that
isn't fixed to just one provider) then sipgate is one of a number of options
you could consider. I personally have a few technical issues with them, but
others on this group seem to use them OK. A provider I use is voip.co.uk,
which is not necessarily as cheap as Sipgate (depending on your calling
pattern), but I have found to be more reliable in my situation. Others will
no doubt be along to recommend their own personal favourites. If you are
after an out-of-the box solution, then Vonage is very good, but more
expensive than nearly all of the others, and cannot (or rather does not want
to) port numbers in or out. Their service is not good if you like to tinker
though, as it is all remotely provisioned.

Be aware that there is some configuration of your ATA that will be required
with most providers, and particularly if you are also using a router, make
good use of your chosen provider's technical support to get the setup
completed successfully. A router with QoS is desirable to ensure call
quality, and it is well worth going through the configuration of that, too.

Again, don't know if you already have an adapter, but if you are on ADSL,
you will need to keep a phone line ("naked DSL" not available yet). In this
case, you might want to consider an ATA with "PSTN fallover" which would
mean you can make use of the BT line for incoming calls, for emergency calls
(if not available with your provider), and in case of power failure.

Regarding the quality of your internet connection, this is the crucial part
for how good the service will be, more important than your phone service
provider as there are more points here that can fail. General advice is
that you need a reliable 100kbps in *BOTH* directions for an acceptable
quality call, the limiting factor generally being the upload speed as
opposed to the download speed. Upload speed is generally one tenth of the
download speed (i.e. a 1 Mbps connection actually has an max. upload speed
of 100kbps). Because the upload speed is less, this means that the people
you speak to will often notice quality issues quicker than you. Also bear
in mind that the maximum speed is not necessarily always achievable, so if
you have good quality between 6-8pm then there is a fair bet that you will
not experience such issues at other times of the day.

A couple of years ago, I tried VoIP for three months, just to check it
worked for me, and I have used it ever since. Since I established that the
reliability was only ever so slightly less than conventional telephony (also
called POTS) I took the plunge and got rid of my POTS line as I am on cable.
I got it back again a couple of months ago, purely for emergency calls. But
with the right equipment, the right ISP and the right ITSP, I am satisfied
that I would not need a POTS line but for this.

Feel free to ask more questions. There is a wealth of experience in this
newsgroup, and only some of us occasionally bite!!


  #7  
Old July 2nd 07, 07:18 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Graham
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 188
Default Telephone over the Internet

Upload speed is generally one tenth of the download speed (i.e. a 1 Mbps
connection actually has an max. upload speed of 100kbps).


I was under the impression that ADSL upload was often fixed at
around 256 Kb/s on a range of products with differing download speeds.

--
Graham.

%Profound_observation%


  #8  
Old July 2nd 07, 08:45 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Herman
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 100
Default Telephone over the Internet


"Graham" wrote in message
...
Upload speed is generally one tenth of the download speed (i.e. a 1 Mbps
connection actually has an max. upload speed of 100kbps).


I was under the impression that ADSL upload was often fixed at
around 256 Kb/s on a range of products with differing download speeds.

--
Graham.

%Profound_observation%

Could be. I may be getting it confused with the old cable 1mbps which was
100kbps upload... It's a while since I had adsl.


  #9  
Old July 2nd 07, 09:54 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Jon
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 666
Default Telephone over the Internet

declared for all the world to hear...
The following was originally posted to uk.telecom.broadband and I was
advised that this is the appropriate NG.

I am thinking of switching my telephone access to the Internet (VOIP). I
have a wireless router and adapter. However, before making the jump -

Am I correct in presuming I would need a special phone to could connect
wirelessly (I couldn't use my existing phone)?


If you purchase a device called an ATA (analogue telephone adapter) you
can use your existing telephone. There are special wifi VoIP phones but
these are quite expensive. An ATA would give more functionality and
flexibility for similar money.

Am I correct in presuming the computer would have to be on 24/7?


No. The router needs to be on, and the ATA if you go that way. The
computer is not part of the setup.

What would happen to incoming calls if the computer was not on?


n/a

Is there an appreciable time in delay in two-way speech?


Not that I've ever noticed.

Are there any other advantages (other than cost) / disadvantages?


No access to 999. 0870 etc are chargeable and dont come from any
inclusive allowance usually.

How reliable is VOIP?


99%

Does VOIP suffer from traffic / congestion problems?


If you've got a big download on the go it can get a bit lossy.

Is there a source of information for beginners?


This newsgroup!
--
Regards
Jon
  #10  
Old July 2nd 07, 10:15 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
GymRatZ
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 18
Default Telephone over the Internet

Jon wrote:

Is there an appreciable time in delay in two-way speech?


Not that I've ever noticed.


We very often find calls to and from UK mobiles can give problems not at
the VOIP end, but echo at the Mobile end. Originally I thought this was
more to do with routing outgoing calls through a non-uk provider
(voipcheap.com) but this is not the case as the same problems are often
experienced from the mobile user dialing in for which we use
voipfone.co.uk who are UK based.

Seems like VOIP codec seems to get mobiles a bit confused pretty often.
Though I'm sure this will be rectified by the Mobile companies as VOIP
becomes more commonplace.

Are there any other advantages (other than cost) / disadvantages?


No access to 999. 0870 etc are chargeable and dont come from any
inclusive allowance usually.


999 calls are available with certain providers.
with voipfone.co.uk you can now register your details with your account
address being the generating source for 999 calls.

This still doesn't tie you into having to route all your calls through
voipfone. I have found them excellent for providing incoming 0845 &
geographical numbers also for routing 0870, 0845, 0800, 0500 calls
through which tend to be more expensive (or not free) when routed
through voipcheap.com etc.


How reliable is VOIP?


99%


From a business perspective I certainly wouldn't dump my PSTN/ADSL
back-up solution in favour of a 100% voip/cable solution. Lost Phone
calls mean lost business, for which it might only take a single customer
to negate any savings made for the next 12 months or longer.

Does VOIP suffer from traffic / congestion problems?


If you've got a big download on the go it can get a bit lossy.


I have often found the need to pause my web-site uploads when making a
call to prevent conversation dropouts even though the router is supposed
to give voice data the highest Quality Of Service and has been set up to
do so as per Drayteks directions.

Pete
--
http://www.gymratz.co.uk
Gym Equipment, Fitness Equipment, Sports Nutrition UK
 




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Telephone over the Internet Bill Ridgeway uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) 14 July 3rd 07 08:10 PM
2-in-1 Skype Internet telephone paul123 uk.telecom.voip (UK VOIP) 6 March 24th 06 06:28 PM
The internet auction site eBay is in talks to buy net telephone company Skype {{{{{Welcome}}}}} uk.telecom.voip (UK VOIP) 0 September 8th 05 02:27 PM
Internet Gateway device created in Network Connections when I removed Internet Connection Sharing Martin Underwood uk.comp.home-networking (UK home networking) 2 April 7th 05 01:56 PM
IP Telephone off of a Avaya Telephone switch Netfool uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) 9 February 15th 05 12:09 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 02:17 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 2.4.0
Copyright 2004-2019 BroadbanterBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.