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uk.telecom.voip (UK VOIP) (uk.telecom.voip) Discussion of topics relevant to packet based voice technologies including Voice over IP (VoIP), Fax over IP (FoIP), Voice over Frame Relay (VoFR), Voice over Broadband (VoB) and Voice on the Net (VoN) as well as service providers, hardware and software for use with these technologies. Advertising is not allowed.

New user questions about VOIP



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 3rd 07, 12:48 PM posted to alt.consumers.uk-discounts.and.bargains,uk.telecom,uk.telecom.voip
Lem
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4
Default New user questions about VOIP

I'm a bit of a newbie when it comes to VOIP and I would like to ask
the specialists here for some pointers.

---

The FAQ I tend to read (eg http://www.voipfaq.net/types+of+voip.php)
do not really help me understand if I would find VOIP is either more
convenient or cheaper than what I have now.

(a) I work at home and have 2 MB cable internet.
(b) It is on for about two-thirds of the working day.
(c) 90% of my calls are to 01/02 and 0845/0844/0870 numbers.
(d) I recently an NTL deal for 24x7 free calls to 01/02 landlines.
(e) I pay £20-£25 per month just for calls (via 2p-a-min Tiscali).

---

(1) Is there any cost advantage in me getting VOIP. I think that in
my situation I would have to pay to use VOIP, wouldn't I.

(2) What destinations would I be better off using VOIP rather than
NTLs 24x7 service?

(3) As it just so happens I need to get a DECT handset. Is it worth
getting a DECT handset with VOIP capability (eg single Panasonic
handset £100 KX-TG9150ES verus non-VOIP £48 KXTG7120ES) or is the
steep extra £50 for VOIP mainly for convenience rather than for
economy?

Thank you for any info.
  #2  
Old July 3rd 07, 03:00 PM posted to alt.consumers.uk-discounts.and.bargains,uk.telecom,uk.telecom.voip
Brian
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 308
Default New user questions about VOIP

On 03-07-2007, Lem wrote:

(3) As it just so happens I need to get a DECT handset. Is it worth
getting a DECT handset with VOIP capability (eg single Panasonic
handset £100 KX-TG9150ES verus non-VOIP £48 KXTG7120ES) or is the
steep extra £50 for VOIP mainly for convenience rather than for
economy?


The extra 50 GBP is for being able to connect to a running version of
Skype on a computer. Which might be a great convenience if Skype was
your preferred method of VoIP communication and there were many Skype
users you were in contact with. Skype-to-Skype calls are free but you
would have to examine the rates on the Skype website to decide on the
economics of purchasing such a phone.

--
Brian
  #3  
Old July 3rd 07, 04:01 PM posted to alt.consumers.uk-discounts.and.bargains,uk.telecom,uk.telecom.voip
Linker3000
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 83
Default New user questions about VOIP

Lem wrote:
I'm a bit of a newbie when it comes to VOIP and I would like to ask
the specialists here for some pointers.

[Snip]

If you are serious about VoIP, forget Skype and go for a 'proper'
SIP-based service - there's plenty to choose from - I'm with voip.co.uk
and no doubt others will suggest their favourites.

With a suitable SIP phone (starting at around £30) or a regular phone
and an Analogue Telephone Adaptor (also starting around £30), you will
have a decent service that's not tied to having a PC running, plus you
can get bundled free minutes among a host of dial plans.

L3K
  #4  
Old July 3rd 07, 07:17 PM posted to alt.consumers.uk-discounts.and.bargains,uk.telecom,uk.telecom.voip
lordy
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default New user questions about VOIP

On 2007-07-03, Owain wrote:

and if you want to have a computer
running all the time you can run Asterisk on it to give you VoIP PBX
facilities.


A bit out of newbie territory but it also runs on Linksys WRT54G.
http://www.voip-info.org/wiki-Asterisk+Linksys+WRT54G


Lordy
  #5  
Old July 3rd 07, 07:18 PM posted to alt.consumers.uk-discounts.and.bargains,uk.telecom,uk.telecom.voip
Brian A
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,037
Default New user questions about VOIP

On Tue, 03 Jul 2007 16:43:11 +0100, Owain
wrote:

Lem wrote:
I'm a bit of a newbie when it comes to VOIP and I would like to ask
the specialists here for some pointers.
(1) Is there any cost advantage in me getting VOIP.


VoIP can be a lot cheaper if you want multiple lines/numbers eg to
separate home and business calls, or different numbers for special
promotions or to track advertising.

(3) As it just so happens I need to get a DECT handset. Is it worth
getting a DECT handset with VOIP capability (eg single Panasonic
handset £100 KX-TG9150ES verus non-VOIP £48 KXTG7120ES) or is the
steep extra £50 for VOIP mainly for convenience rather than for
economy?


As Brian says, those are for connecting to a computer. Use an Analogue
Terminal Adapter and connect any ordinary phone (or feed the output into
a PBX) or use a proper IP phone that connects direct to your router, and
you won't have to have your computer on all the time. A proper IP phone
can also cope with multiple 'lines' and if you want to have a computer
running all the time you can run Asterisk on it to give you VoIP PBX
facilities.

As you work from home your home will be subject to the Health and Safety
At Work Act and you should consider that VoIP is less resilient than
ordinary telephone service, doesn't work if you have a power or
equipment failure, and may not allow you to make 999 calls (and will not
provide the emergency services with your location automatically) so you
need to carry out a risk assessment and determine whether alternative
provision for 999 calls is needed.

Owain

I keep a spare mobile phone on at all times for 999 use.
I agree with Linker3000, it is far better to forget about Skype and
invest in a real voip system. When running Skype you have to factor in
the cost of running a computer or you have to buy expensive hardware
that runs on Skype without a computer. Whatever, you are tying
yourself up with a single provider.
Consider voip.co.uk for your UK 01/02 calls using an UNLOCKED ATA.
If you are retaining a BT landline then 18185 are probably the
cheapest for calls to 0845/0870. They are still accessible, via a
geographic 02 or a free 0808 via voip if you choose to drop your
landline (if you have cable broadband).

---
Remove 'no_spam_' from email address.

Sign the petition to get High Definition TV via Freeview.
Get your friends to sign too!
Ofcom want to auction off the spectrum needed for Hi Def.
TV.
http://petitions.pm.gov.uk/High-Definition/
---
  #6  
Old July 3rd 07, 08:18 PM posted to alt.consumers.uk-discounts.and.bargains,uk.telecom,uk.telecom.voip
Graham
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 188
Default New user questions about VOIP




(a) I work at home and have 2 MB cable internet.

That's a good start

(b) It is on for about two-thirds of the working day.

That's not so good. Why isn't it available 24/7?

(c) 90% of my calls are to 01/02 and 0845/0844/0870 numbers.

But what is the ratio of 01/02 to 0845/0844/0870? Non-geographic numbers are
bad news however you make your calls.

(d) I recently an NTL deal for 24x7 free calls to 01/02 landlines.

OK

(e) I pay £20-£25 per month just for calls (via 2p-a-min Tiscali).


I don't think I understand that.

---

(1) Is there any cost advantage in me getting VOIP. I think that in
my situation I would have to pay to use VOIP, wouldn't I.

No, at least not in the sense I think you mean.
You just buy the hardware, probably an ATA, and sign up for
one or more voip accounts. It' usually free to sign up and with
some like Sipgate.co.uk you can choose an incoming number
in almost any UK STD area. All free.
To make outgoing calls you put credit into the account. Sipgate
charge per minute for 01/02 calls, you might prefer an outgoing
provider like voipcheap.com (the one I use) which has a slightly
different credit protocol.

(2) What destinations would I be better off using VOIP rather than
NTLs 24x7 service?


Arn't you paying a premium in standing charge/line rental for this
privalage?

If you are calling international destinations that will be an important
factor in choosing your voip provider. As you will discover there are
many of these, largely unknown names to the public at large,
many are owned by the same corporation! But the main difference
between them is the rates they charge to particular countries.


(3) As it just so happens I need to get a DECT handset. Is it worth
getting a DECT handset with VOIP capability (eg single Panasonic
handset £100 KX-TG9150ES verus non-VOIP £48 KXTG7120ES) or is the
steep extra £50 for VOIP mainly for convenience rather than for
economy?


I would recommend you go for an ATA and an ordinary DECT phone.



Thank you for any info.




  #7  
Old July 3rd 07, 09:24 PM posted to alt.consumers.uk-discounts.and.bargains,uk.telecom,uk.telecom.voip
PC Paul
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default New user questions about VOIP

Graham wrote:
(a) I work at home and have 2 MB cable internet.

That's a good start

(b) It is on for about two-thirds of the working day.

That's not so good. Why isn't it available 24/7?


I suspect it is, it's the PC that's only on 2/3 of the day. But I may be
wrong.

To the OP:
With an ATA or a VoIP compatible router like the FritzBox you plug it
into the cable router and the phone is always available, whether the PC
is on or not. With an ATA you might need a network switch/hub to get
enough connections, but these are cheap.

In my case (Vonage - simple and flat rate per month for 01/02 numbers,
and they supplied the router 'free') I have a router that plugs into the
cable modem and gives me four ethernet ports and a normal phone jack.
You just plug a standard phone or DECT base station in and use it as normal.

The PC isn't involved at all.

(c) 90% of my calls are to 01/02 and 0845/0844/0870 numbers.

But what is the ratio of 01/02 to 0845/0844/0870? Non-geographic numbers are
bad news however you make your calls.

(d) I recently an NTL deal for 24x7 free calls to 01/02 landlines.

OK

(e) I pay £20-£25 per month just for calls (via 2p-a-min Tiscali).


I don't think I understand that.


Ouch. You can easily do better. You'd have trouble doing worse..

---

(1) Is there any cost advantage in me getting VOIP. I think that in
my situation I would have to pay to use VOIP, wouldn't I.

No, at least not in the sense I think you mean.
You just buy the hardware, probably an ATA, and sign up for
one or more voip accounts. It' usually free to sign up and with
some like Sipgate.co.uk you can choose an incoming number
in almost any UK STD area. All free.
To make outgoing calls you put credit into the account. Sipgate
charge per minute for 01/02 calls, you might prefer an outgoing
provider like voipcheap.com (the one I use) which has a slightly
different credit protocol.

(2) What destinations would I be better off using VOIP rather than
NTLs 24x7 service?


Arn't you paying a premium in standing charge/line rental for this
privalage?

If you are calling international destinations that will be an important
factor in choosing your voip provider. As you will discover there are
many of these, largely unknown names to the public at large,
many are owned by the same corporation! But the main difference
between them is the rates they charge to particular countries.

(3) As it just so happens I need to get a DECT handset. Is it worth
getting a DECT handset with VOIP capability (eg single Panasonic
handset £100 KX-TG9150ES verus non-VOIP £48 KXTG7120ES) or is the
steep extra £50 for VOIP mainly for convenience rather than for
economy?


I would recommend you go for an ATA and an ordinary DECT phone.


Ditto. Definitely don't get a VoIP phone. They cost luxury prices and
tie you to a single VoIP supplier, usually Skype.


  #8  
Old July 4th 07, 02:36 AM posted to alt.consumers.uk-discounts.and.bargains,uk.telecom,uk.telecom.voip
Martin²
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 848
Default New user questions about VOIP

You would make biggest saving by ditching your landline, thus doing away
with the line rental.
NTL / Virgin Media should let you do that.
You could make other savings if at least some of your regular contacts are
on VoIP too, then the calls can be free.
If that is of any use you could have second / third etc. line at no extra
cost (try that with BT !).
Regards,
Martin


  #9  
Old July 4th 07, 06:08 AM posted to alt.consumers.uk-discounts.and.bargains,uk.telecom,uk.telecom.voip
bhm
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 14
Default New user questions about VOIP


"Lem" wrote in message
...

uk.telecom.voip is this way --------


 




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