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uk.telecom.voip (UK VOIP) (uk.telecom.voip) Discussion of topics relevant to packet based voice technologies including Voice over IP (VoIP), Fax over IP (FoIP), Voice over Frame Relay (VoFR), Voice over Broadband (VoB) and Voice on the Net (VoN) as well as service providers, hardware and software for use with these technologies. Advertising is not allowed.

Stupid question? ISDN / ASDL / Cable



 
 
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  #1  
Old March 4th 08, 05:41 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Michael
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 43
Default Stupid question? ISDN / ASDL / Cable

Folks

I run a voip line on the end of a cable connection from Virgin, and I
fully understand that the system works as the cable is 'always on'.

What I don't understand is ..... others, who do not have 'always on'
cable, use VoIP ..... but how?

My Mum for example, uses (as it happens) AOL for her Internet -and it
a dial up broadband system. How could she use VoIP - would she have to
leave her connection to AOL on 24/7?

Sorry for being so thick.

Regards


Mick

--

  #2  
Old March 4th 08, 06:01 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
mr deo
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 53
Default Stupid question? ISDN / ASDL / Cable


"Michael" wrote in message
...
Folks

I run a voip line on the end of a cable connection from Virgin, and I
fully understand that the system works as the cable is 'always on'.

What I don't understand is ..... others, who do not have 'always on'
cable, use VoIP ..... but how?

My Mum for example, uses (as it happens) AOL for her Internet -and it
a dial up broadband system. How could she use VoIP - would she have to
leave her connection to AOL on 24/7?

Sorry for being so thick.

Regards


Mick

--


ASDL/CABLE are all "always on" and should be fine
ISDN can be "always on" or work like dialup.. depending on how it's
configured..

Dialup is not Viable for good quality VoIP (It was 15 years ago when you
were paying 3£/min for an international call)
On a personal note ;P..... AOL is not viable for anything or anyone no
matter where they are :P


  #3  
Old March 4th 08, 06:43 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Graham.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 503
Default Stupid question? ISDN / ASDL / Cable


"Michael" wrote in message
...
Folks

I run a voip line on the end of a cable connection from Virgin, and I
fully understand that the system works as the cable is 'always on'.

What I don't understand is ..... others, who do not have 'always on'
cable, use VoIP ..... but how?

My Mum for example, uses (as it happens) AOL for her Internet -and it
a dial up broadband system. How could she use VoIP - would she have to
leave her connection to AOL on 24/7?

Sorry for being so thick.

Regards


Mick

--



I imagine the only reason that your mums ADSL is not always on
is because she is using a USB modem powered by her computer.

Strictly speaking it is not "dial-up broadband" but Windows dial-up
networking is typically used to initiate the connection, so it may seem
that way.
For VoIP, and other serious internet use, you would have a router
to connect to the Internet independent of your computer(s)

--
Graham

%Profound_observation%


  #4  
Old March 4th 08, 06:47 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Ivor Jones
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 579
Default Stupid question? ISDN / ASDL / Cable

"Graham." wrote in message


[snip]

imagine the only reason that your mums ADSL is not
: : always on
: : is because she is using a USB modem powered by her
: : computer.
: :
: : Strictly speaking it is not "dial-up broadband" but
: : Windows dial-up networking is typically used to
: : initiate the connection, so it may seem that way.
: : For VoIP, and other serious internet use, you would
: : have a router
: : to connect to the Internet independent of your
: : computer(s)

Which with AOL is not as easy as it could be........

Ivor

  #5  
Old March 4th 08, 08:53 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Michael
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 43
Default Stupid question? ISDN / ASDL / Cable

Graham. wrote:


"Michael" wrote in message
...
Folks

I run a voip line on the end of a cable connection from Virgin, and
I fully understand that the system works as the cable is 'always
on'.

What I don't understand is ..... others, who do not have 'always on'
cable, use VoIP ..... but how?

My Mum for example, uses (as it happens) AOL for her Internet
-and it a dial up broadband system. How could she use VoIP - would
she have to leave her connection to AOL on 24/7?

Sorry for being so thick.

Regards


Mick

--



I imagine the only reason that your mums ADSL is not always on
is because she is using a USB modem powered by her computer.

Strictly speaking it is not "dial-up broadband" but Windows dial-up
networking is typically used to initiate the connection, so it may
seem that way.
For VoIP, and other serious internet use, you would have a router
to connect to the Internet independent of your computer(s)


Thanks Graham

I don't actually know if she has ADSL or ISDN - but I do know she has
the BT type USB modem ...... so that would seem to be ADSL.

She uses AOL as she in her 80's and I needed her to have some sort of
'safe' experience .... dare not let her loose at her age with an
unfettered experience!

In real terms, she uses the Internet to speak to my sister on the other
side of the Atlantic (Skype) ... and to swap email's with various
family members. Everything else is a struggle ..... if it were possible
to simply plug in an ATA and a phone, I be straight onto it ....

SIMPLE would have to be the key element.

Regards

Mick

--

  #6  
Old March 5th 08, 10:18 AM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Woody
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 48
Default Stupid question? ISDN / ASDL / Cable

"Michael" wrote in message
news
Graham. wrote:


"Michael" wrote in message
...
Folks

I run a voip line on the end of a cable connection from Virgin, and
I fully understand that the system works as the cable is 'always
on'.

What I don't understand is ..... others, who do not have 'always
on'
cable, use VoIP ..... but how?

My Mum for example, uses (as it happens) AOL for her Internet
-and it a dial up broadband system. How could she use VoIP - would
she have to leave her connection to AOL on 24/7?

Sorry for being so thick.

Regards


Mick

--



I imagine the only reason that your mums ADSL is not always on
is because she is using a USB modem powered by her computer.

Strictly speaking it is not "dial-up broadband" but Windows dial-up
networking is typically used to initiate the connection, so it may
seem that way.
For VoIP, and other serious internet use, you would have a router
to connect to the Internet independent of your computer(s)


Thanks Graham

I don't actually know if she has ADSL or ISDN - but I do know she has
the BT type USB modem ...... so that would seem to be ADSL.

She uses AOL as she in her 80's and I needed her to have some sort of
'safe' experience .... dare not let her loose at her age with an
unfettered experience!

In real terms, she uses the Internet to speak to my sister on the
other
side of the Atlantic (Skype) ... and to swap email's with various
family members. Everything else is a struggle ..... if it were
possible
to simply plug in an ATA and a phone, I be straight onto it ....

SIMPLE would have to be the key element.

Regards

Mick

--




A neighbour of ours is on AOL and has recently got broadband from the
same source. They provided a wireless router within the package. Maybe
try talking to AOL as it would look as though she has always-on ADSL and
just doesn't know it?

If that is the case then an ATA will do the job fine. I have a Sipura
which became Linksys which is now Cisco and it works well. Just make
sure she is not on a capped service as talk eats capacity.


--
Woody

harrogate three at ntlworld dot com


  #7  
Old March 6th 08, 12:23 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Mr JM
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 31
Default Stupid question? ISDN / ASDL / Cable


SIMPLE would have to be the key element.

Regards

Mick


So considere getting a proper VoIP phone (SNOM or others) that you plug into
a router. It looks like a phone, feel like a phone, works like a phone, and
(this is where you need an ADSL modem/router) is always on like any other
phone . You may have to install it and set it up for her, but after that, it
should be smooth....

JM


  #8  
Old March 7th 08, 09:10 AM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Michael
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 43
Default Stupid question? ISDN / ASDL / Cable

Mr JM wrote:


SIMPLE would have to be the key element.

Regards

Mick


So considere getting a proper VoIP phone (SNOM or others) that you
plug into a router. It looks like a phone, feel like a phone, works
like a phone, and (this is where you need an ADSL modem/router) is
always on like any other phone . You may have to install it and set
it up for her, but after that, it should be smooth....

JM


Thanks everyone.

I'll give it some thought before making a suggestion. She's not known
as the Prophet Of Doom for no good reason, so I will have to KNOW it
will work first time upon installation. Will do some research with AOL
I think!

Again, thanks for the comments and suggestions.

Mick

--

  #9  
Old March 7th 08, 11:39 AM posted to uk.telecom.voip
R. Mark Clayton
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 699
Default Stupid question? ISDN / ASDL / Cable


"Michael" wrote in message
...
Folks

I run a voip line on the end of a cable connection from Virgin, and I
fully understand that the system works as the cable is 'always on'.

What I don't understand is ..... others, who do not have 'always on'
cable, use VoIP ..... but how?

My Mum for example, uses (as it happens) AOL for her Internet -and it
a dial up broadband system. How could she use VoIP - would she have to
leave her connection to AOL on 24/7?

Sorry for being so thick.

Regards


Mick

--


It doesn't have to be "always on", just when you want to use it or take
calls - a bit like my girlfriends mobile.

It is possible to VOIP over an ISDN connection, but I never tried it. The
quality would probably be similar to PSTN, but not as good as raw ISDN.

It was possible to VOIP over dial up, but as you can imagine the quality
would be poor.

Perhaps someone can tell us if you can VOIP over 3G and how many channels
you need, bear in mind though that the network providers will intentionally
impede this working easily.


  #10  
Old March 7th 08, 02:34 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Gordon Henderson
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Posts: 797
Default Stupid question? ISDN / ASDL / Cable

In article ,
R. Mark Clayton wrote:

"Michael" wrote in message
...
Folks

I run a voip line on the end of a cable connection from Virgin, and I
fully understand that the system works as the cable is 'always on'.

What I don't understand is ..... others, who do not have 'always on'
cable, use VoIP ..... but how?

My Mum for example, uses (as it happens) AOL for her Internet -and it
a dial up broadband system. How could she use VoIP - would she have to
leave her connection to AOL on 24/7?

Sorry for being so thick.

Regards


Mick

--


It doesn't have to be "always on", just when you want to use it or take
calls - a bit like my girlfriends mobile.

It is possible to VOIP over an ISDN connection, but I never tried it. The
quality would probably be similar to PSTN, but not as good as raw ISDN.

It was possible to VOIP over dial up, but as you can imagine the quality
would be poor.


I've managed to have a successfull VoIP conversation over a shakey 33.6K
modem connection using the GSM codec. I imagine it might have been a
shade better using g729... Latency was a bit high (as ping times are
over dialup), but other than that it was "usable"...

If you can get both channels of the ISDN line up, then running a full
bandwidth codec (g711) over it via SIP or IAX should't be an issue at
all. Bit of a waste of the lines though, but if you had free Internet
connectivity over it, it might be better than paying BT ...

Perhaps someone can tell us if you can VOIP over 3G and how many channels
you need, bear in mind though that the network providers will intentionally
impede this working easily.


I've had a colleague call me via VoIP and a 3G connection. Bit laggy,
but otherwise OK. Not had a chance to try myself yet. Maybe this weekend
I'll have a play...

Gordon
 




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