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For Kraftee - lead single pair entry cable?



 
 
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  #1  
Old March 15th 08, 10:31 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
m
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 82
Default For Kraftee - lead single pair entry cable?

Hi Kraftee.

In your experience, would the final 50ft or so length of single pair
from the BT outside to the NTE(I assume he has one) being the original
lead covered cable, from the 1050s or earlier, be a problem with BB?
He only syncs at 2.6 whereas we next door get 6.2.
Although on a different exchange number, they are served from the same
exchange building (in Ealing)and I know for a fact there is only a
single street cable on most of the route.
I am sure I would never think of doing a temporary bypass (would I??)
but IF I do, and it improves things, will BT replace it FOC?
Especially as he has just signed up for a BT homehub etc etc.

Mike

  #2  
Old March 15th 08, 12:07 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Parker 51
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Posts: 2
Default For Kraftee - lead single pair entry cable?


"m" wrote in message
...

snip

... would the final 50ft or so length of single pair from the BT
outside to the NTE(I assume he has one) being the original lead covered
cable, from the 1050s or earlier, be a problem with BB?


snip

Almost certainly.

I don't think they had even invented tin cans on the end of a piece of
string in the 11th century!


  #3  
Old March 15th 08, 03:08 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
naza
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Posts: 185
Default For Kraftee - lead single pair entry cable?


... would the final 50ft or so length of single pair from the BT
outside to the NTE(I assume he has one) being the original lead covered
cable, from the 1050s or earlier, be a problem with BB?


I don't think they had even invented tin cans on the end of a piece of
string in the 11th century!


I think he means 1950's. Got a mate with the same problem. In exactly
the same position as your mate. Everyone around him gets 7mbps, he
gets just under 2mbps. I assume the guy has got the older grey cable
dropwire, I used to have one until this year when there was a problem
with the phone line and it was replaced by BT. It made no change
whatsoever to the attenuation but improvement in the SNR, with a
twisted pair for quite obvious reasons. Speed gain of 200kbps, and no
drop-outs during the day. Before hand when the lights on the street
came on the EMI from them would reduce the noisemargin and make the
modem resync at a lower speed
  #4  
Old March 15th 08, 03:18 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Eeyore
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Posts: 3,222
Default For Kraftee - lead single pair entry cable?



naza wrote:

... would the final 50ft or so length of single pair from the BT
outside to the NTE(I assume he has one) being the original lead covered
cable, from the 1050s or earlier, be a problem with BB?


I don't think they had even invented tin cans on the end of a piece of
string in the 11th century!


I think he means 1950's. Got a mate with the same problem. In exactly
the same position as your mate. Everyone around him gets 7mbps, he
gets just under 2mbps. I assume the guy has got the older grey cable
dropwire, I used to have one until this year when there was a problem
with the phone line and it was replaced by BT. It made no change
whatsoever to the attenuation but improvement in the SNR, with a
twisted pair for quite obvious reasons. Speed gain of 200kbps, and no
drop-outs during the day. Before hand when the lights on the street
came on the EMI from them would reduce the noisemargin and make the
modem resync at a lower speed


I had a figure of eight style grey drop wire ages ago but before I got
broadband so I can't make a direct comparison but simply the fact it's not a
twisted pair would be a negative factor for ADSL.

Graham


  #5  
Old March 15th 08, 03:26 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Roger Mills
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Posts: 368
Default For Kraftee - lead single pair entry cable?

In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
m wrote:

Hi Kraftee.

In your experience, would the final 50ft or so length of single pair
from the BT outside to the NTE(I assume he has one) being the original
lead covered cable, from the 1050s or earlier, be a problem with BB?
He only syncs at 2.6 whereas we next door get 6.2.
Although on a different exchange number, they are served from the same
exchange building (in Ealing)and I know for a fact there is only a
single street cable on most of the route.
I am sure I would never think of doing a temporary bypass (would I??)
but IF I do, and it improves things, will BT replace it FOC?
Especially as he has just signed up for a BT homehub etc etc.

Mike


If you only 'assume' that your neighbour has an NTE, you presumably know
little or nothing about his internal wiring, which could have a significant
influence on synch speed. If he has an NTE5 with removeable faceplate, get
him to plug his ADSL kit directly into the test socket behind the faceplate,
and see whether that makes any difference.
--
Cheers,
Roger
______
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monitored.. Messages sent to it may not be read for several weeks.
PLEASE REPLY TO NEWSGROUP!


  #6  
Old March 15th 08, 05:53 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Roger Mills
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Posts: 368
Default For Kraftee - lead single pair entry cable?

In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
Eeyore wrote:


I had a figure of eight style grey drop wire ages ago but before I got
broadband so I can't make a direct comparison but simply the fact
it's not a twisted pair would be a negative factor for ADSL.

Graham


Why? A twisted pair cable is good for cancelling out any induced
electro-magnetic pickup - but if the cable is not running close to a source
of such pickup, it really doesn't matter.
--
Cheers,
Roger
______
Email address maintained for newsgroup use only, and not regularly
monitored.. Messages sent to it may not be read for several weeks.
PLEASE REPLY TO NEWSGROUP!


  #7  
Old March 15th 08, 06:41 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Eeyore
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Posts: 3,222
Default For Kraftee - lead single pair entry cable?



Roger Mills wrote:

In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
Eeyore wrote:

I had a figure of eight style grey drop wire ages ago but before I got
broadband so I can't make a direct comparison but simply the fact
it's not a twisted pair would be a negative factor for ADSL.


Why? A twisted pair cable is good for cancelling out any induced
electro-magnetic pickup - but if the cable is not running close to a source
of such pickup, it really doesn't matter.


Electro-magnetic noise is EVERYWHERE these days.

Graham

  #8  
Old March 15th 08, 07:08 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
kráftéé
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Posts: 1,765
Default For Kraftee - lead single pair entry cable?

naza wrote:
... would the final 50ft or so length of single pair from
the BT outside to the NTE(I assume he has one) being the original
lead covered cable, from the 1050s or earlier, be a problem with
BB?


I don't think they had even invented tin cans on the end of a
piece of string in the 11th century!


I think he means 1950's. Got a mate with the same problem. In
exactly the same position as your mate. Everyone around him gets
7mbps, he gets just under 2mbps. I assume the guy has got the older
grey cable dropwire, I used to have one until this year when there
was a problem with the phone line and it was replaced by BT. It
made no change whatsoever to the attenuation but improvement in the
SNR, with a twisted pair for quite obvious reasons. Speed gain of
200kbps, and no drop-outs during the day. Before hand when the
lights on the street came on the EMI from them would reduce the
noisemargin and make the modem resync at a lower speed


It's standard practice now to change any DW8 anywhere on a job,just to
bring it up to standard, just wish some would remember it though (did
I really say that?)....


  #9  
Old March 15th 08, 07:10 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
kráftéé
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,765
Default For Kraftee - lead single pair entry cable?

Roger Mills wrote:
In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
Eeyore wrote:


I had a figure of eight style grey drop wire ages ago but before I
got broadband so I can't make a direct comparison but simply the
fact it's not a twisted pair would be a negative factor for ADSL.

Graham


Why? A twisted pair cable is good for cancelling out any induced
electro-magnetic pickup - but if the cable is not running close to
a source of such pickup, it really doesn't matter.


It all depends on the strength of the signal affecting the service &
the twist also help to stop the pick up of RF pick up as well as EM.


  #10  
Old March 15th 08, 07:14 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
kráftéé
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,765
Default For Kraftee - lead single pair entry cable?

m wrote:
Hi Kraftee.

In your experience, would the final 50ft or so length of single pair
from the BT outside to the NTE(I assume he has one) being the
original lead covered cable, from the 1050s or earlier, be a
problem with BB? He only syncs at 2.6 whereas we next door get 6.2.
Although on a different exchange number, they are served from the
same exchange building (in Ealing)and I know for a fact there is
only a single street cable on most of the route.
I am sure I would never think of doing a temporary bypass (would
I??) but IF I do, and it improves things, will BT replace it FOC?
Especially as he has just signed up for a BT homehub etc etc.

Mike


Think you've got the jist, while I was away. Yes it could make a very
big difference to the service he gets.

As for getting it changed free of charge.........Well when the moon is
blue.

Sorry if I sound unsympathetic but that is the way it works nowadays.

Remer also that just because he comes of the same pole as you, doesn't
mean to say that he is routed thru the same cables which can make a
very big difference.


 




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