A Broadband and ADSL forum. BroadbanterBanter

Welcome to BroadbanterBanter.

You are currently viewing as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions and other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today.

Go Back   Home » BroadbanterBanter forum » Newsgroup Discussions » uk.telecom.voip (UK VOIP)
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

uk.telecom.voip (UK VOIP) (uk.telecom.voip) Discussion of topics relevant to packet based voice technologies including Voice over IP (VoIP), Fax over IP (FoIP), Voice over Frame Relay (VoFR), Voice over Broadband (VoB) and Voice on the Net (VoN) as well as service providers, hardware and software for use with these technologies. Advertising is not allowed.

DIY ISP



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old April 10th 08, 10:57 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Theo Markettos
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 539
Default DIY ISP

Let's say I want to set up my own dialin server. I don't have a spare PSTN
phone connection. Getting a geographic incoming number is usually
straightforward (Sipgate et al are free). What are the issues with trying
to do this with VOIP? I suppose the problem is I don't actually want V near
any IP. Is there any protocol to having the PSTN-VOIP gateway act as a
modem, rather than a voice sampler? I know there are protocols for fax, but
for modem data?

Is there some way I could get, say, an encapsulated PPP stream over the net?
Are there services that provide this?

Thanks
Theo
  #2  
Old April 11th 08, 10:46 AM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Paul Hayes
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 50
Default DIY ISP

Theo Markettos wrote:
Let's say I want to set up my own dialin server. I don't have a spare PSTN
phone connection. Getting a geographic incoming number is usually
straightforward (Sipgate et al are free). What are the issues with trying
to do this with VOIP? I suppose the problem is I don't actually want V near
any IP. Is there any protocol to having the PSTN-VOIP gateway act as a
modem, rather than a voice sampler? I know there are protocols for fax, but
for modem data?

Is there some way I could get, say, an encapsulated PPP stream over the net?
Are there services that provide this?

Thanks
Theo


This is difficult to make work. What bitrate you can achieve will
depend on the quality of the IP link between you and your VoIP service
provider. I'd say to probably hope for around 14,400bps using g711a/u
codec. There is an ITU standard called V.150.1 which is the modem
equivalent of t.38 but I've never heard of any equipment or service
providers using it. Timing critical connections such as modem and faxes
are always going to be a pain over IP due to the lack of strict timing
between source and destination on a IP network.

If you are using a Linksys ATA then your best bet is to read this I
wrote a while ago about faxing over IP:

http://www.provu.co.uk/pdf/sipura/ip...ra_linksys.pdf

otherwise, try and apply the same settings to whatever ATA you have. It
basically involves turning off features such as variable jitter buffers
and echo cancellation which can all interfere with the modem comms.

Someone asked this very same question on here not so long ago I'm sure.
Try searching the list archives to see who it was and if they got
anywhere with it.

Another option would be to search for a dialup ISP who simply allow you
to connect as and when you want for no charge other than the phone call,
such companies exist... the name Geoisp springs to mind although I could
be imagining it.

cheers,
Paul.
  #3  
Old April 11th 08, 01:27 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Desk Rabbit
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 169
Default DIY ISP

Theo Markettos wrote:
Let's say I want to set up my own dialin server. I don't have a spare PSTN
phone connection. Getting a geographic incoming number is usually
straightforward (Sipgate et al are free). What are the issues with trying
to do this with VOIP? I suppose the problem is I don't actually want V near
any IP. Is there any protocol to having the PSTN-VOIP gateway act as a
modem, rather than a voice sampler? I know there are protocols for fax, but
for modem data?

Is there some way I could get, say, an encapsulated PPP stream over the net?
Are there services that provide this?

Thanks
Theo

What you need is one of these
http://networking.ringofsaturn.com/R...Portmaster.php

Seriously though, what are you *actually* trying to achieve? If you want
to connect to your PC then use any one of the many remote control
programs. Are you wanting to give a dialup service for clients and
customers? If so use one of the many free dialup numbers such as
http://www.adial.co.uk/
http://www.free-dialup.net/
http://www.nocostdialup.co.uk/

These came from a simple Google of free dialup.
  #4  
Old April 11th 08, 06:03 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Theo Markettos
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 539
Default DIY ISP

Desk Rabbit wrote:
What you need is one of these
http://networking.ringofsaturn.com/R...Portmaster.php


A bit more than I wanted And doesn't it require a POTS or ISDN line to
operate?

Seriously though, what are you *actually* trying to achieve? If you want
to connect to your PC then use any one of the many remote control
programs. Are you wanting to give a dialup service for clients and
customers? If so use one of the many free dialup numbers such as
http://www.adial.co.uk/
http://www.free-dialup.net/
http://www.nocostdialup.co.uk/


'Free' dialup comes from the same school as 'unlimited' broadband - ie it
isn't. If you use it for anything more than trivial lengths of time you end
up with a very large phone bill.

I'm wanting a dialup with a geographic number. I'm also wanting one that
doesn't become engaged or congested at busy times (which rules out GeoISP
and similar). It's an advantage for it to terminate in my network because
then I have control over onward routing, rather than at some random ISP. Of
course I could tunnel, but then I'd waste precious dialup bandwidth on the
encapsulation.

Now it seems to me that an ATA is more complex than a modem, so I can't see
why the PSTN-Internet interface couldn't accommodate a modem too. And get
better rates than an analogue-analogue connection because a device
synchronised to digital PSTN can do 56K.

I suppose the problem is the business model - Sipgate only make a tiny
amount from incoming calls and most of their revenue is from outgoing calls.
Such a system wouldn't have anything outgoing. But I'm not averse to paying
an up-front fee.

Theo
  #5  
Old April 11th 08, 07:42 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
TheFug
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 140
Default DIY ISP

Theo Markettos schreef:
Let's say I want to set up my own dialin server. I don't have a spare PSTN
phone connection. Getting a geographic incoming number is usually
straightforward (Sipgate et al are free). What are the issues with trying
to do this with VOIP? I suppose the problem is I don't actually want V near
any IP. Is there any protocol to having the PSTN-VOIP gateway act as a
modem, rather than a voice sampler? I know there are protocols for fax, but
for modem data?

Is there some way I could get, say, an encapsulated PPP stream over the net?
Are there services that provide this?

Thanks
Theo


I guess not, this wheel has already been invented for you....it was hard
enough

--

The Fug.

( VoIP/SIP switched by: www.mysipswitch.com )
  #6  
Old April 11th 08, 10:53 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Gordon Henderson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 797
Default DIY ISP

In article ,
Theo Markettos wrote:
Desk Rabbit wrote:
What you need is one of these
http://networking.ringofsaturn.com/R...Portmaster.php


A bit more than I wanted And doesn't it require a POTS or ISDN line to
operate?

Seriously though, what are you *actually* trying to achieve? If you want
to connect to your PC then use any one of the many remote control
programs. Are you wanting to give a dialup service for clients and
customers? If so use one of the many free dialup numbers such as
http://www.adial.co.uk/
http://www.free-dialup.net/
http://www.nocostdialup.co.uk/


'Free' dialup comes from the same school as 'unlimited' broadband - ie it
isn't. If you use it for anything more than trivial lengths of time you end
up with a very large phone bill.

I'm wanting a dialup with a geographic number. I'm also wanting one that
doesn't become engaged or congested at busy times (which rules out GeoISP
and similar). It's an advantage for it to terminate in my network because
then I have control over onward routing, rather than at some random ISP. Of
course I could tunnel, but then I'd waste precious dialup bandwidth on the
encapsulation.

Now it seems to me that an ATA is more complex than a modem, so I can't see
why the PSTN-Internet interface couldn't accommodate a modem too. And get
better rates than an analogue-analogue connection because a device
synchronised to digital PSTN can do 56K.


I think you'll struggle to get 56K.

So, PC (digital) - Modem (analogue) - PSTN (digital) - ITSP (maybe
same digital?) - Internet - ATA - Modem (analogue)

I think that because you've got a 2nd analog link in there that 33K6 is
the best you could expect.

In paractice because of the nature of the Internet, jitter, packet loss
then maintaining a modem signal might be tricky...

Saying that, I've experimented with sending FAXes over the Internet (fax
machine - ATA - Internet - Asterisk - email) and it's generally
worked OK, but I'd not like to rely on it.

I suppose the problem is the business model - Sipgate only make a tiny
amount from incoming calls and most of their revenue is from outgoing calls.
Such a system wouldn't have anything outgoing. But I'm not averse to paying
an up-front fee.


You've nothing to lose (well a few pence) by connecting a modem to a BT
line and dialling your Sipgate number with an ATA connected to a modem
(connected to eg. a Linux box running PPP) and seeing what happens...

Good luck!

Gordon
  #7  
Old April 12th 08, 03:03 PM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Desk Rabbit
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 169
Default DIY ISP

Theo Markettos wrote:
Desk Rabbit wrote:
What you need is one of these
http://networking.ringofsaturn.com/R...Portmaster.php


A bit more than I wanted And doesn't it require a POTS or ISDN line to
operate?

No it doesn't but it's the only way you are going to get a 56K
connection with a modem. 33-36K is the best you will get modem to modem.

snip irrelevancies

So once again I ask, what exactly are you trying to a achieve?

Let me put it another way, assuming you get this link working, what are
you going to use it for?
  #8  
Old April 13th 08, 08:47 AM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Desk Rabbit
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 17
Default DIY ISP

Gordon Henderson wrote:
In article ,
Theo Markettos wrote:

Desk Rabbit wrote:

What you need is one of these
http://networking.ringofsaturn.com/R...Portmaster.php


A bit more than I wanted And doesn't it require a POTS or ISDN line to
operate?


Seriously though, what are you *actually* trying to achieve? If you want
to connect to your PC then use any one of the many remote control
programs. Are you wanting to give a dialup service for clients and
customers? If so use one of the many free dialup numbers such as
http://www.adial.co.uk/
http://www.free-dialup.net/
http://www.nocostdialup.co.uk/


'Free' dialup comes from the same school as 'unlimited' broadband - ie it
isn't. If you use it for anything more than trivial lengths of time you end
up with a very large phone bill.

I'm wanting a dialup with a geographic number. I'm also wanting one that
doesn't become engaged or congested at busy times (which rules out GeoISP
and similar). It's an advantage for it to terminate in my network because
then I have control over onward routing, rather than at some random ISP. Of
course I could tunnel, but then I'd waste precious dialup bandwidth on the
encapsulation.

Now it seems to me that an ATA is more complex than a modem, so I can't see
why the PSTN-Internet interface couldn't accommodate a modem too. And get
better rates than an analogue-analogue connection because a device
synchronised to digital PSTN can do 56K.



I think you'll struggle to get 56K.

Indeed. 56K back to back doesn't work. From Wikipedia:-

"56k modems can only work at 56k if there is one pulse-code modulation
to analog conversion in the path between the internet service provider's
digital equipment and the user's modem. When this is not the case or
when two 56k modems are used to communicate with each other they will
generally fall back to 33.6 kbit/s using V.34 analog modulation. The 56
kbit/s transmission exploits the fact that most telephone exchanges are
interconnected with digital lines and so can use more efficient
transmission techniques over twisted-pair lines."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/56k_modem
  #9  
Old April 13th 08, 10:50 AM posted to uk.telecom.voip
stephen
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 381
Default DIY ISP

"Desk Rabbit" wrote in message
...
Gordon Henderson wrote:
In article ,
Theo Markettos wrote:

Desk Rabbit wrote:

What you need is one of these
http://networking.ringofsaturn.com/R...Portmaster.php

A bit more than I wanted And doesn't it require a POTS or ISDN line

to
operate?


Seriously though, what are you *actually* trying to achieve? If you

want
to connect to your PC then use any one of the many remote control
programs. Are you wanting to give a dialup service for clients and
customers? If so use one of the many free dialup numbers such as
http://www.adial.co.uk/
http://www.free-dialup.net/
http://www.nocostdialup.co.uk/

'Free' dialup comes from the same school as 'unlimited' broadband - ie

it
isn't. If you use it for anything more than trivial lengths of time you

end
up with a very large phone bill.

I'm wanting a dialup with a geographic number. I'm also wanting one

that
doesn't become engaged or congested at busy times (which rules out

GeoISP
and similar). It's an advantage for it to terminate in my network

because
then I have control over onward routing, rather than at some random ISP.

Of
course I could tunnel, but then I'd waste precious dialup bandwidth on

the
encapsulation.

Now it seems to me that an ATA is more complex than a modem, so I can't

see
why the PSTN-Internet interface couldn't accommodate a modem too. And

get
better rates than an analogue-analogue connection because a device
synchronised to digital PSTN can do 56K.



I think you'll struggle to get 56K.

Indeed. 56K back to back doesn't work. From Wikipedia:-


not quite - the test describes the ISP digital modems are doing the reverse
conversion.

what this is saying is 2 V.92? modems wont give you 56kbps back to back if
you go thru 2 analog to PCM conversions in between (ie modem -analog
line - PCM - analog - modem).

obviously there is kit that can cope with 1 conversion, since all those old
modem dial in banks run by ISPs did exactly that - although they had to
hooked up in a particular way to make it work.

"56k modems can only work at 56k if there is one pulse-code modulation
to analog conversion in the path between the internet service provider's
digital equipment and the user's modem. When this is not the case or
when two 56k modems are used to communicate with each other they will
generally fall back to 33.6 kbit/s using V.34 analog modulation. The 56
kbit/s transmission exploits the fact that most telephone exchanges are
interconnected with digital lines and so can use more efficient
transmission techniques over twisted-pair lines."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/56k_modem

--
Regards

- replace xyz with ntl


  #10  
Old April 13th 08, 11:52 AM posted to uk.telecom.voip
Gordon Henderson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 797
Default DIY ISP

In article ,
stephen wrote:

obviously there is kit that can cope with 1 conversion, since all those old
modem dial in banks run by ISPs did exactly that - although they had to
hooked up in a particular way to make it work.


They went by various names - eg. Livingston Portmonster, or "not
modems" .... They plumbed into the PSTN via E1 / ISDN30 lines and took
the data digitally with no intervening analogue conversion stage, other
than the modem at the customers end. (hence the term "not modem") They
did clever DSP type work internally to recreate the original digital
data out of the digitally encoded analogue data, ran the other end of
the (usually) PPP link, then presented it as an IP connection out on an
Ethernet line.

Gordon
 




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 01:54 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 2.4.0
Copyright 2004-2019 BroadbanterBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.