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uk.comp.home-networking (UK home networking) (uk.comp.home-networking) Discussion of all aspects of computer networking in the home, regardless of the platforms, software, topologies and protocols used. Examples of topics include recommendations for hardware or suppliers (e.g. NICs and cabling), protocols, servers, and specific network software. Advertising is not allowed.

What practical range does one get with wireless networking?



 
 
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  #1  
Old April 14th 08, 08:20 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 180
Default What practical range does one get with wireless networking?

OK, I acknowledge that pretty much "how long is a piece of string" but
I can be a *bit* more spcific! :-)

I have a Draytek Vigor 2820n router sitting on my desk with its three
aerials. If I stick the matching Vigor N61 wireless USB adapter in a
laptop (which I don't have at the moment) what sort of range am I
likely to get?

The house has brick walls, will the signal get through an internal and
an external wall to the outside? Once outside there's very little in
the way for quite a distance.

--
Chris Green
  #2  
Old April 14th 08, 08:31 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Conor
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Posts: 161
Default What practical range does one get with wireless networking?

In article , says...
OK, I acknowledge that pretty much "how long is a piece of string" but
I can be a *bit* more spcific! :-)

I have a Draytek Vigor 2820n router sitting on my desk with its three
aerials. If I stick the matching Vigor N61 wireless USB adapter in a
laptop (which I don't have at the moment) what sort of range am I
likely to get?

The house has brick walls, will the signal get through an internal and
an external wall to the outside? Once outside there's very little in
the way for quite a distance.


Sod all. USB adapters are ****e. Most of the signal from the USB stick
to the router will be blocked by the wall. The router isn't the issue.

On my Netgear I can get a very good signal through 2 walls, 10ft deep
conservatory then a 40ft garden.


--
Conor

I only please one person per day. Today is not your day. Tomorrow isn't
looking good either. - Scott Adams
  #3  
Old April 14th 08, 09:42 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Mortimer
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 342
Default What practical range does one get with wireless networking?

"Conor" wrote in message
...
In article , says...
OK, I acknowledge that pretty much "how long is a piece of string" but
I can be a *bit* more spcific! :-)

I have a Draytek Vigor 2820n router sitting on my desk with its three
aerials. If I stick the matching Vigor N61 wireless USB adapter in a
laptop (which I don't have at the moment) what sort of range am I
likely to get?

The house has brick walls, will the signal get through an internal and
an external wall to the outside? Once outside there's very little in
the way for quite a distance.


Sod all. USB adapters are ****e. Most of the signal from the USB stick
to the router will be blocked by the wall. The router isn't the issue.

On my Netgear I can get a very good signal through 2 walls, 10ft deep
conservatory then a 40ft garden.


With my Netgear DG834GT I get perfect reception upstairs and downstairs
within my house (OK, so the internal walls are just plasterboard!) and also
across the communal parking area about 50 yards away. Mind you I felt a
pillock walking around the car park with my laptop in "water-divining"
position checking for signal range ;-)


  #4  
Old April 15th 08, 10:20 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 180
Default What practical range does one get with wireless networking?

Mortimer wrote:
"Conor" wrote in message
...
In article , says...
OK, I acknowledge that pretty much "how long is a piece of string" but
I can be a *bit* more spcific! :-)

I have a Draytek Vigor 2820n router sitting on my desk with its three
aerials. If I stick the matching Vigor N61 wireless USB adapter in a
laptop (which I don't have at the moment) what sort of range am I
likely to get?

The house has brick walls, will the signal get through an internal and
an external wall to the outside? Once outside there's very little in
the way for quite a distance.


Sod all. USB adapters are ****e. Most of the signal from the USB stick
to the router will be blocked by the wall. The router isn't the issue.

On my Netgear I can get a very good signal through 2 walls, 10ft deep
conservatory then a 40ft garden.


With my Netgear DG834GT I get perfect reception upstairs and downstairs
within my house (OK, so the internal walls are just plasterboard!) and also
across the communal parking area about 50 yards away. Mind you I felt a
pillock walking around the car park with my laptop in "water-divining"
position checking for signal range ;-)

OK, thanks, that gives me some sort of idea of the sort of range I'm
likely to be able to get.

I have just realised that I can move the router to an upstairs window
sill as I have both a telephone connection and a cat5 lead going
there. That should enable me to get reasonable outside coverage at
least.

--
Chris Green
  #5  
Old April 15th 08, 10:39 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Mortimer
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 342
Default What practical range does one get with wireless networking?

wrote in message
...
With my Netgear DG834GT I get perfect reception upstairs and downstairs
within my house (OK, so the internal walls are just plasterboard!) and
also
across the communal parking area about 50 yards away. Mind you I felt a
pillock walking around the car park with my laptop in "water-divining"
position checking for signal range ;-)

OK, thanks, that gives me some sort of idea of the sort of range I'm
likely to be able to get.

I have just realised that I can move the router to an upstairs window
sill as I have both a telephone connection and a cat5 lead going
there. That should enable me to get reasonable outside coverage at
least.


Just remembered another situation with very difficult results: router
upstairs beside a window in a modern wooden-clad brick house but it gives a
barely usable signal in a wooden shed about 20 yards away with direct line
of sight to the router. I don't think the shed has foil lining on the
internal plasterboard skin.

This is with either a DG834G or a DG834PN - the latter is supposed to cope
better with weaker multipath signals.


  #6  
Old April 15th 08, 11:00 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
JohnW
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 34
Default What practical range does one get with wireless networking?

Mortimer, in article
[email protected], says...

Just remembered another situation with very difficult results: router
upstairs beside a window in a modern wooden-clad brick house but it gives a
barely usable signal in a wooden shed about 20 yards away with direct line
of sight to the router. I don't think the shed has foil lining on the
internal plasterboard skin.


No, but the house probably has, since there should be a vapour
barrier, which can be a foil coated product since this has the
added function of reflecting radiant heat.

My house is particularly bad for WiFi, since it uses the old
breeze blocks made from furnace ash, which has a high metallic
content. I can hardly get coverage from room to room, not to
mention standing wave interference...

--
JohnW.
Replace the obvious with co.uk in 2 places to mail me.
  #7  
Old April 15th 08, 05:29 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 180
Default What practical range does one get with wireless networking?

JohnW wrote:
Mortimer, in article
[email protected], says...

Just remembered another situation with very difficult results: router
upstairs beside a window in a modern wooden-clad brick house but it gives a
barely usable signal in a wooden shed about 20 yards away with direct line
of sight to the router. I don't think the shed has foil lining on the
internal plasterboard skin.


No, but the house probably has, since there should be a vapour
barrier, which can be a foil coated product since this has the
added function of reflecting radiant heat.

My house is particularly bad for WiFi, since it uses the old
breeze blocks made from furnace ash, which has a high metallic
content. I can hardly get coverage from room to room, not to
mention standing wave interference...

I just realised my wife has left her laptop at home so I did the
"wandering about wireless divining with a laptop" thing. I'm trying
the BT Business Hub wireless first as it is turned on.

With the router on my desk it just about covers the house but not much
more. I'll try it upstairs and/or the Draytek Vigor and see if
they're any better.

This is with the built-in wireless on the Laptop, a Fujitsu Lifebook.

--
Chris Green
  #8  
Old April 21st 08, 03:43 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
GB
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 18
Default What practical range does one get with wireless networking?


wrote in message
...

This is with the built-in wireless on the Laptop, a Fujitsu Lifebook.



http://www.freeantennas.com/projects...te2/index.html
Try one of these (seriously).



  #9  
Old April 22nd 08, 12:25 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Another Dave
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 35
Default What practical range does one get with wireless networking?

On Mon, 21 Apr 2008 15:43:55 +0100, GB wrote:

wrote in message

http://www.freeantennas.com/projects...te2/index.html Try one of
these (seriously).


Cool! I'll try one of these.

--
/home/david/Sig.txt
  #10  
Old April 22nd 08, 12:25 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Another Dave
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 35
Default What practical range does one get with wireless networking?

On Mon, 21 Apr 2008 15:43:55 +0100, GB wrote:

wrote in message

http://www.freeantennas.com/projects...te2/index.html Try one of
these (seriously).


Cool! I'll try one of these.

--
/home/david/Sig.txt
 




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