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uk.comp.home-networking (UK home networking) (uk.comp.home-networking) Discussion of all aspects of computer networking in the home, regardless of the platforms, software, topologies and protocols used. Examples of topics include recommendations for hardware or suppliers (e.g. NICs and cabling), protocols, servers, and specific network software. Advertising is not allowed.

Using tow LAN connectors on desktop mainboard



 
 
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  #1  
Old April 16th 08, 04:45 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Roger R
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default Using tow LAN connectors on desktop mainboard

My XP desktop mainboard (Asus) has two ethernet LAN connectors.
One 100T Mb speed, the other a gigabyte speed.

Mainboard manual has no guide for implementation of these connectors.

I thought to use the 100 speed for connection to router and then internet,
and to use the high speed connector to link to a Win98 machine that I have
fitted with gigabyte speed card. This doesn't seem to work however.

The 100 speed connector works fine for the router modem internet, but the
high speed link to the other machine doesn't work at all, and knocks the
internet connection out when enabled.

What might be the intended purpose of these two LAN connectors?

Is a simple network linking two machines using a high speed connection and
the low speed connection for the router, possible using these LAN
connectors?

Roger R


  #2  
Old April 16th 08, 11:42 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
PeeGee
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Posts: 311
Default Using tow LAN connectors on desktop mainboard

Roger R wrote:
My XP desktop mainboard (Asus) has two ethernet LAN connectors.
One 100T Mb speed, the other a gigabyte speed.

Mainboard manual has no guide for implementation of these connectors.

I thought to use the 100 speed for connection to router and then internet,
and to use the high speed connector to link to a Win98 machine that I have
fitted with gigabyte speed card. This doesn't seem to work however.

The 100 speed connector works fine for the router modem internet, but the
high speed link to the other machine doesn't work at all, and knocks the
internet connection out when enabled.

What might be the intended purpose of these two LAN connectors?

Is a simple network linking two machines using a high speed connection and
the low speed connection for the router, possible using these LAN
connectors?

Roger R



With 100Mb, you would use a cross-over cable to connect the computers -
don't know if there is an equivalent for Gigabit :-(

Otherwise, you will need a gigabit switch or one of the NICs to be
capable of presenting the equivalent interface (effectively appearing to
be a switch).

--
PeeGee

The reply address is a spam trap. All mail is reported as spam.
"Nothing should be able to load itself onto a computer without the
knowledge or consent of the computer user. Software should also be able
to be removed from a computer easily."
Peter Cullen, Microsoft Chief Privacy Strategist (Computing 18 Aug 05)
  #6  
Old April 17th 08, 06:50 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Rob Morley
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Posts: 1,379
Default Using tow LAN connectors on desktop mainboard

In article , Roger R
says...

Connecting all three...XP, Win98 and router/modem...to a gigabyte switch
works fine but I was worried about the vulnerability of the win98 machine
as, apart from that in the router/modem, it has no separate firewall. The
XP machine has third party (Zone Alarm) firewall, but that is not available
for win98.


Previous version are available he

download.zonelabs.com/bin/free/information/znalm/zaReleaseHistory.html

I think the 5.X versions ran on W98, but I can't remember - I switched
to Kerio Personal Firewall which was much better. It's long since been
discontinued but can still download it he

http://web.archive.org/web/200404041....com/dwn/kpf/k
erio-pf-2.1.5-en-win.exe

http://tinyurl.com/6yp8ea

I thought it might improve the security of the win98 machine if it could
only be reached through the XP machine by putting it on a dedicated gigabyte
link using the other ethernet connector. Presumably if this were achieved
it would not have access to the internet...or would it?


Not unless you were running software to let the two networks talk to
each other.

...perhaps that was the previous trouble...it was also set up with TCP/IP
giving internet access and conflicted with the XP machine TCP/IP.

If properly configured the two networks should have no effect on each
other at all.
  #7  
Old April 18th 08, 07:18 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Jon
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Posts: 666
Default Using tow LAN connectors on desktop mainboard

In article , d-e-c-o-d-e-
says...
Connecting all three...XP, Win98 and router/modem...to a gigabyte switch
works fine but I was worried about the vulnerability of the win98 machine
as, apart from that in the router/modem, it has no separate firewall. The
XP machine has third party (Zone Alarm) firewall, but that is not available
for win98.


The forewall in the router will offer sufficient protection from
incoming stuff. Zone alarm is good at stopping outgoing stuff, so as
long as you dont habitually click on things you shouldnt you ought to be
allright.

The win98 machine will still be behnd the router/firewall, it won't be
exposed.

I thought it might improve the security of the win98 machine if it could
only be reached through the XP machine by putting it on a dedicated gigabyte
link using the other ethernet connector. Presumably if this were achieved
it would not have access to the internet...or would it?


You could, but it would take a lot of buggering about. I think what you
describing is called bridging? If so, one way of doing it would be on
the XP machine go to network connections, highlight the 2 connections by
holding CTRL and clicking on them both, then right-click and choose
"bridge".

I've never had occasion to use it so I don't know 100% of the above is
true, but it rings a bell.
--
Regards
Jon
  #8  
Old April 18th 08, 10:17 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
PeeGee
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 311
Default Using tow LAN connectors on desktop mainboard

Roger R wrote:
"Jon" wrote in message
...
In article , d-e-c-o-d-e-
says...
Is a simple network linking two machines using a high speed connection
and
the low speed connection for the router, possible using these LAN
connectors?

Can you noy just link the win98 machine to the router also?


Yes I can do that...the router/modem is 4 port 100T...but then the XP
Win98 link is only 100T and I want to transfere large...2Gb video files.

Connecting all three...XP, Win98 and router/modem...to a gigabyte switch
works fine but I was worried about the vulnerability of the win98 machine
as, apart from that in the router/modem, it has no separate firewall. The
XP machine has third party (Zone Alarm) firewall, but that is not available
for win98.

I thought it might improve the security of the win98 machine if it could
only be reached through the XP machine by putting it on a dedicated gigabyte
link using the other ethernet connector. Presumably if this were achieved
it would not have access to the internet...or would it?


What you are describing is Internet Connection Sharing (ICS), though
IIRC it was originally used to allow a network to use a single computer
with an analogue modem - I used it with two Win98 systems - though I
don't see why another NIC couldn't be used. It is still available in XP.


...perhaps that was the previous trouble...it was also set up with TCP/IP
giving internet access and conflicted with the XP machine TCP/IP.

Roger R






--
PeeGee

The reply address is a spam trap. All mail is reported as spam.
"Nothing should be able to load itself onto a computer without the
knowledge or consent of the computer user. Software should also be able
to be removed from a computer easily."
Peter Cullen, Microsoft Chief Privacy Strategist (Computing 18 Aug 05)
 




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