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uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

Diagnosing intermittent connection problems



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 5th 08, 10:22 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Mortimer
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 342
Default Diagnosing intermittent connection problems

A customer has been having intermittent ADSL connection problems ever since
she got broadband about 6 months ago (though I only learned of this a week
ago) and the symptoms have got much more frequent over the past couple of
weeks.

Can I check that I have done the correct diagnostic checks.

The router is a BT Voyager 210.

Symptoms are either:

1. Router DSL light remains on but Internet light (ADSL logon) goes out.
This is the more frequent symptom.

or

2. Router DSL light goes out and router retrains. This happens less
frequently.


Typically everything works fine for about an hour and then there is a flurry
of problems with failures maybe every 10 minutes or so, followed by another
long fault-free period.

Why would a router that has a good DSL carrier intermittently lose its logon
and need to be manually connected again, either by rebooting the router or
else by going into the router's config page and pressing the Connect button?

I have put the router in the master test socket with all other
wiring/equipment disconnected. I have replaced the RJ11-RJ11 cable and
microfilter with an RJ11-BT cable to elimiminate the effect of faults in the
cable or filter.

I have checked the line stats and they are good: downstream attenuation of
about 30 dB and noise margin of 8 dB, and upstream lower attenuation /
higher margin. The results for the router in the master test socket are only
about 2 dB better than those with the router in the normal house wiring with
everythign connected, which suggests that wiring/equipment is not the cause.

Despite these good figures, the router can be seen to lose sync at random -
the stats then disappear.

I have tried with another router (BT Voyager 220) and this reported the same
stats and failed in the same way. I wasn't able to check the loss of ADSL
logon connection when there was a good DSL carrier because this router was
locked to work only with BT lines - I've since learned how to re-flash it to
remove that restriction!


Does all of this point to a line fault between the master socket and the
exchange? It may be significant that when I was doing all my testing, there
was constant heavy rain which could cause water in cable joins on poles or
in underground ducts.


I've raised a call with the ISP but they haven't yet responded apart from
acknowledging the ticket and escalating it to the correct department.


  #2  
Old June 5th 08, 10:45 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Graham J
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 389
Default Diagnosing intermittent connection problems



"Mortimer" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
A customer has been having intermittent ADSL connection problems ever since
she got broadband about 6 months ago (though I only learned of this a week
ago) and the symptoms have got much more frequent over the past couple of
weeks.

Can I check that I have done the correct diagnostic checks.

The router is a BT Voyager 210.

Symptoms are either:

1. Router DSL light remains on but Internet light (ADSL logon) goes out.
This is the more frequent symptom.

or

2. Router DSL light goes out and router retrains. This happens less
frequently.


[snip details]


Have you tried a different make of router? (A reputable brand such as
Vigor)

Get the router to report to a local syslog so you can see exactly when the
failures occur and their nature.

Who is the ISP ?? If they don't respond to you within a few hours with a
sensible proposal for resolving the problem I suggest a change to a more
technically competent ISP is your first priority.

--
Graham J


  #3  
Old June 6th 08, 12:08 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
kráftéé
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,765
Default Diagnosing intermittent connection problems

Mortimer wrote:
A customer has been having intermittent ADSL connection problems
ever since she got broadband about 6 months ago (though I only
learned of this a week ago) and the symptoms have got much more
frequent over the past couple of weeks.

Can I check that I have done the correct diagnostic checks.

The router is a BT Voyager 210.

Symptoms are either:

1. Router DSL light remains on but Internet light (ADSL logon) goes
out. This is the more frequent symptom.

or

2. Router DSL light goes out and router retrains. This happens less
frequently.


Typically everything works fine for about an hour and then there is
a flurry of problems with failures maybe every 10 minutes or so,
followed by another long fault-free period.

Why would a router that has a good DSL carrier intermittently lose
its logon and need to be manually connected again, either by
rebooting the router or else by going into the router's config page
and pressing the Connect button?
I have put the router in the master test socket with all other
wiring/equipment disconnected. I have replaced the RJ11-RJ11 cable
and microfilter with an RJ11-BT cable to elimiminate the effect of
faults in the cable or filter.

I have checked the line stats and they are good: downstream
attenuation of about 30 dB and noise margin of 8 dB, and upstream
lower attenuation / higher margin. The results for the router in
the master test socket are only about 2 dB better than those with
the router in the normal house wiring with everythign connected,
which suggests that wiring/equipment is not the cause.
Despite these good figures, the router can be seen to lose sync at
random - the stats then disappear.

I have tried with another router (BT Voyager 220) and this reported
the same stats and failed in the same way. I wasn't able to check
the loss of ADSL logon connection when there was a good DSL carrier
because this router was locked to work only with BT lines - I've
since learned how to re-flash it to remove that restriction!


Does all of this point to a line fault between the master socket
and the exchange? It may be significant that when I was doing all
my testing, there was constant heavy rain which could cause water
in cable joins on poles or in underground ducts.


I've raised a call with the ISP but they haven't yet responded
apart from acknowledging the ticket and escalating it to the
correct department.


It could be an intermitent noise on the line, buggers to find if there isn't
any other diagnostics. Had one today, in the end I had to swap a pair as
there were no fault conditions other than this intermitent noise (& before
anybody says, no I didn't give it a blast with my Mega as it's been taken
away from me so I have to use the infamous Hawk, looks like a ladies hand
bag stuffed with bricks & is twice as useless, most of the time).


  #4  
Old June 6th 08, 11:35 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Klunk
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 98
Default Diagnosing intermittent connection problems

On Thu, 05 Jun 2008 23:08:09 +0100, kraftee passed an empty day by
writing:

Mortimer wrote:
A customer has been having intermittent ADSL connection problems ever
since she got broadband about 6 months ago (though I only learned of
this a week ago) and the symptoms have got much more frequent over the
past couple of weeks.

Can I check that I have done the correct diagnostic checks.

The router is a BT Voyager 210.

Symptoms are either:

1. Router DSL light remains on but Internet light (ADSL logon) goes
out. This is the more frequent symptom.

or

2. Router DSL light goes out and router retrains. This happens less
frequently.


Typically everything works fine for about an hour and then there is a
flurry of problems with failures maybe every 10 minutes or so, followed
by another long fault-free period.

Why would a router that has a good DSL carrier intermittently lose its
logon and need to be manually connected again, either by rebooting the
router or else by going into the router's config page and pressing the
Connect button?
I have put the router in the master test socket with all other
wiring/equipment disconnected. I have replaced the RJ11-RJ11 cable and
microfilter with an RJ11-BT cable to elimiminate the effect of faults
in the cable or filter.

I have checked the line stats and they are good: downstream attenuation
of about 30 dB and noise margin of 8 dB, and upstream lower attenuation
/ higher margin. The results for the router in the master test socket
are only about 2 dB better than those with the router in the normal
house wiring with everythign connected, which suggests that
wiring/equipment is not the cause. Despite these good figures, the
router can be seen to lose sync at random - the stats then disappear.

I have tried with another router (BT Voyager 220) and this reported the
same stats and failed in the same way. I wasn't able to check the loss
of ADSL logon connection when there was a good DSL carrier because this
router was locked to work only with BT lines - I've since learned how
to re-flash it to remove that restriction!


Does all of this point to a line fault between the master socket and
the exchange? It may be significant that when I was doing all my
testing, there was constant heavy rain which could cause water in cable
joins on poles or in underground ducts.


I've raised a call with the ISP but they haven't yet responded apart
from acknowledging the ticket and escalating it to the correct
department.


It could be an intermitent noise on the line, buggers to find if there
isn't any other diagnostics. Had one today, in the end I had to swap a
pair as there were no fault conditions other than this intermitent noise
(& before anybody says, no I didn't give it a blast with my Mega as it's
been taken away from me so I have to use the infamous Hawk, looks like a
ladies hand bag stuffed with bricks & is twice as useless, most of the
time).


The 'infamous hawk' has a 500v insulation tester built in, just like the
old 18c megger. Don't say you missed that on the training and threw the
booklet in the back of your van ;-)
  #5  
Old June 6th 08, 09:29 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
kráftéé
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,765
Default Diagnosing intermittent connection problems

Klunk wrote:
On Thu, 05 Jun 2008 23:08:09 +0100, kraftee passed an empty day by
writing:

Mortimer wrote:
A customer has been having intermittent ADSL connection problems
ever since she got broadband about 6 months ago (though I only
learned of this a week ago) and the symptoms have got much more
frequent over the past couple of weeks.

Can I check that I have done the correct diagnostic checks.

The router is a BT Voyager 210.

Symptoms are either:

1. Router DSL light remains on but Internet light (ADSL logon)
goes out. This is the more frequent symptom.

or

2. Router DSL light goes out and router retrains. This happens
less frequently.


Typically everything works fine for about an hour and then there
is a flurry of problems with failures maybe every 10 minutes or
so, followed by another long fault-free period.

Why would a router that has a good DSL carrier intermittently
lose its logon and need to be manually connected again, either by
rebooting the router or else by going into the router's config
page and pressing the Connect button?
I have put the router in the master test socket with all other
wiring/equipment disconnected. I have replaced the RJ11-RJ11
cable and microfilter with an RJ11-BT cable to elimiminate the
effect of faults in the cable or filter.

I have checked the line stats and they are good: downstream
attenuation of about 30 dB and noise margin of 8 dB, and upstream
lower attenuation / higher margin. The results for the router in
the master test socket are only about 2 dB better than those with
the router in the normal house wiring with everythign connected,
which suggests that wiring/equipment is not the cause. Despite
these good figures, the router can be seen to lose sync at random
- the stats then disappear.

I have tried with another router (BT Voyager 220) and this
reported the same stats and failed in the same way. I wasn't able
to check the loss of ADSL logon connection when there was a good
DSL carrier because this router was locked to work only with BT
lines - I've since learned how to re-flash it to remove that
restriction!


Does all of this point to a line fault between the master socket
and the exchange? It may be significant that when I was doing all
my testing, there was constant heavy rain which could cause water
in cable joins on poles or in underground ducts.


I've raised a call with the ISP but they haven't yet responded
apart from acknowledging the ticket and escalating it to the
correct department.


It could be an intermitent noise on the line, buggers to find if
there isn't any other diagnostics. Had one today, in the end I
had to swap a pair as there were no fault conditions other than
this intermitent noise (& before anybody says, no I didn't give it
a blast with my Mega as it's been taken away from me so I have to
use the infamous Hawk, looks like a ladies hand bag stuffed with
bricks & is twice as useless, most of the time).


The 'infamous hawk' has a 500v insulation tester built in, just
like the old 18c megger. Don't say you missed that on the training
and threw the booklet in the back of your van ;-)


Believe or not I'm still waiting for the advanced Hawk training for over 2
years & the no training was provided by 2 work shy coaches looking for a
couple of days out of the field.. As for coupling it to my PC via Bluetooth
or serial port I figured it out on my own but don't see a use for it until
they actually start to record the test readings, like never as with the
Harrier..


  #6  
Old June 6th 08, 09:53 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
m
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 82
Default Diagnosing intermittent connection problems



kraftee wrote:

The 'infamous hawk' has a 500v insulation tester built in, just
like the old 18c megger. Don't say you missed that on the training
and threw the booklet in the back of your van ;-)



Believe or not I'm still waiting for the advanced Hawk training for over 2
years & the no training was provided by 2 work shy coaches looking for a
couple of days out of the field.. As for coupling it to my PC via Bluetooth
or serial port I figured it out on my own but don't see a use for it until
they actually start to record the test readings, like never as with the
Harrier..


I am surprised you are allowed to use anything like 500v with all
today's Health and Safety.
The old original 'Meggers' with big handles were really good! I only
managed to leave work with smaller version.

The GPO safely madness even went as far as being the ecuse for not
renting unequipped fibres (like they used to do with coaxes) cos someone
said that there was adanger of looking down a 'lit' fibre it it was
provisioned by a third party.

Have to say anyone looking down a fibre is stupid anyway - although the
laser pointers are a very good quick way to see if a fibre is continuous.
We used them often on TV Outside Broadcasts to check the temporary .

Mikefibres

  #7  
Old June 7th 08, 02:09 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
kráftéé
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,765
Default Diagnosing intermittent connection problems

m wrote:
kraftee wrote:

The 'infamous hawk' has a 500v insulation tester built in, just
like the old 18c megger. Don't say you missed that on the training
and threw the booklet in the back of your van ;-)



Believe or not I'm still waiting for the advanced Hawk training
for over 2 years & the no training was provided by 2 work shy
coaches looking for a couple of days out of the field.. As for
coupling it to my PC via Bluetooth or serial port I figured it out
on my own but don't see a use for it until they actually start to
record the test readings, like never as with the Harrier..


I am surprised you are allowed to use anything like 500v with all
today's Health and Safety.
The old original 'Meggers' with big handles were really good! I only
managed to leave work with smaller version.

The GPO safely madness even went as far as being the ecuse for not
renting unequipped fibres (like they used to do with coaxes) cos
someone said that there was adanger of looking down a 'lit' fibre
it it was provisioned by a third party.

Have to say anyone looking down a fibre is stupid anyway - although
the laser pointers are a very good quick way to see if a fibre is
continuous. We used them often on TV Outside Broadcasts to check
the temporary .
Mikefibres


Don't tell him it's nearer 150V as he will then have to make up something
else to grumble about.

But it is typical & is still going on, we've got new starters who have got
no idea what or how to test using equipment supposedly costing thousands of
pounds. 'Der Management' appear to have the believe that if you spend lots
of money on new equipment & nothing on training things are going to improve.
For me the most prominent one is the lack of DSL training now given to
supposed DSL trained engineers. When I was trained (& it was one of the few
you had to pass & yes some did fail) it was a residential 2 week course & it
still didn't cover all the areas required, nowadays it's 2 days in the local
'skill centre' being taught by someone who just wants an easy couple of days
& then they are sent out with the simple instruction if the green LED is on
everything is ok. I do really wish it was that simple.....


  #8  
Old June 7th 08, 07:25 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Klunk
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 98
Default Diagnosing intermittent connection problems

On Fri, 06 Jun 2008 20:29:29 +0100, kraftee passed an empty day by
writing:

Klunk wrote:
On Thu, 05 Jun 2008 23:08:09 +0100, kraftee passed an empty day by
writing:

Mortimer wrote:
A customer has been having intermittent ADSL connection problems ever
since she got broadband about 6 months ago (though I only learned of
this a week ago) and the symptoms have got much more frequent over
the past couple of weeks.

Can I check that I have done the correct diagnostic checks.

The router is a BT Voyager 210.

Symptoms are either:

1. Router DSL light remains on but Internet light (ADSL logon) goes
out. This is the more frequent symptom.

or

2. Router DSL light goes out and router retrains. This happens less
frequently.


Typically everything works fine for about an hour and then there is a
flurry of problems with failures maybe every 10 minutes or so,
followed by another long fault-free period.

Why would a router that has a good DSL carrier intermittently lose
its logon and need to be manually connected again, either by
rebooting the router or else by going into the router's config page
and pressing the Connect button? I have put the router in the master
test socket with all other wiring/equipment disconnected. I have
replaced the RJ11-RJ11 cable and microfilter with an RJ11-BT cable to
elimiminate the effect of faults in the cable or filter.

I have checked the line stats and they are good: downstream
attenuation of about 30 dB and noise margin of 8 dB, and upstream
lower attenuation / higher margin. The results for the router in the
master test socket are only about 2 dB better than those with the
router in the normal house wiring with everythign connected, which
suggests that wiring/equipment is not the cause. Despite these good
figures, the router can be seen to lose sync at random - the stats
then disappear.

I have tried with another router (BT Voyager 220) and this reported
the same stats and failed in the same way. I wasn't able to check the
loss of ADSL logon connection when there was a good DSL carrier
because this router was locked to work only with BT lines - I've
since learned how to re-flash it to remove that restriction!


Does all of this point to a line fault between the master socket and
the exchange? It may be significant that when I was doing all my
testing, there was constant heavy rain which could cause water in
cable joins on poles or in underground ducts.


I've raised a call with the ISP but they haven't yet responded apart
from acknowledging the ticket and escalating it to the correct
department.

It could be an intermitent noise on the line, buggers to find if there
isn't any other diagnostics. Had one today, in the end I had to swap
a pair as there were no fault conditions other than this intermitent
noise (& before anybody says, no I didn't give it a blast with my Mega
as it's been taken away from me so I have to use the infamous Hawk,
looks like a ladies hand bag stuffed with bricks & is twice as
useless, most of the time).


The 'infamous hawk' has a 500v insulation tester built in, just like
the old 18c megger. Don't say you missed that on the training and threw
the booklet in the back of your van ;-)


Believe or not I'm still waiting for the advanced Hawk training for over
2 years & the no training was provided by 2 work shy coaches looking for
a couple of days out of the field.. As for coupling it to my PC via
Bluetooth or serial port I figured it out on my own but don't see a use
for it until they actually start to record the test readings, like never
as with the Harrier..


It is not part of the advanced course. It is a basic feature of the unit.
Normally it tests at 95v but pressing the button next to that figure
cycles it through 95, 500, -500, -95. On later software they may have
removed it but it still exists in the 'bridge' mode enabling a nice blast
of 500v to be applied.

For intermittent noisy faults I bought a cheap Tempo Sidekick off of
eBay. The stress test was very useful and why BT have nothing like it I
don't know. It applies a 1khz tone across the pair at 140v and you can
watch the HR jump about on the meter. I picked it up for £30 (but I've
seen them go for a £1) and it gave me enough of an edge to spend more
valuable time drinking tea ;-)
  #9  
Old June 7th 08, 09:10 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
kráftéé
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,765
Default Diagnosing intermittent connection problems

Klunk wrote:
On Fri, 06 Jun 2008 20:29:29 +0100, kraftee passed an empty day by
writing:

Klunk wrote:
On Thu, 05 Jun 2008 23:08:09 +0100, kraftee passed an empty day by
writing:

Mortimer wrote:
A customer has been having intermittent ADSL connection
problems ever since she got broadband about 6 months ago
(though I only learned of this a week ago) and the symptoms
have got much more frequent over the past couple of weeks.

Can I check that I have done the correct diagnostic checks.

The router is a BT Voyager 210.

Symptoms are either:

1. Router DSL light remains on but Internet light (ADSL logon)
goes out. This is the more frequent symptom.

or

2. Router DSL light goes out and router retrains. This happens
less frequently.


Typically everything works fine for about an hour and then
there is a flurry of problems with failures maybe every 10
minutes or so, followed by another long fault-free period.

Why would a router that has a good DSL carrier intermittently
lose its logon and need to be manually connected again, either
by rebooting the router or else by going into the router's
config page and pressing the Connect button? I have put the
router in the master test socket with all other
wiring/equipment disconnected. I have replaced the RJ11-RJ11
cable and microfilter with an RJ11-BT cable to elimiminate the
effect of faults in the cable or filter.

I have checked the line stats and they are good: downstream
attenuation of about 30 dB and noise margin of 8 dB, and
upstream lower attenuation / higher margin. The results for the
router in the master test socket are only about 2 dB better
than those with the router in the normal house wiring with
everythign connected, which suggests that wiring/equipment is
not the cause. Despite these good figures, the router can be
seen to lose sync at random - the stats then disappear.

I have tried with another router (BT Voyager 220) and this
reported the same stats and failed in the same way. I wasn't
able to check the loss of ADSL logon connection when there was
a good DSL carrier because this router was locked to work only
with BT lines - I've since learned how to re-flash it to remove
that restriction!


Does all of this point to a line fault between the master
socket and the exchange? It may be significant that when I was
doing all my testing, there was constant heavy rain which could
cause water in cable joins on poles or in underground ducts.


I've raised a call with the ISP but they haven't yet responded
apart from acknowledging the ticket and escalating it to the
correct department.

It could be an intermitent noise on the line, buggers to find if
there isn't any other diagnostics. Had one today, in the end I
had to swap a pair as there were no fault conditions other than
this intermitent noise (& before anybody says, no I didn't give
it a blast with my Mega as it's been taken away from me so I
have to use the infamous Hawk, looks like a ladies hand bag
stuffed with bricks & is twice as useless, most of the time).

The 'infamous hawk' has a 500v insulation tester built in, just
like the old 18c megger. Don't say you missed that on the
training and threw the booklet in the back of your van ;-)


Believe or not I'm still waiting for the advanced Hawk training
for over 2 years & the no training was provided by 2 work shy
coaches looking for a couple of days out of the field.. As for
coupling it to my PC via Bluetooth or serial port I figured it out
on my own but don't see a use for it until they actually start to
record the test readings, like never as with the Harrier..


It is not part of the advanced course. It is a basic feature of the
unit. Normally it tests at 95v but pressing the button next to that
figure cycles it through 95, 500, -500, -95. On later software they
may have removed it but it still exists in the 'bridge' mode
enabling a nice blast of 500v to be applied.


Well that's where we differ, later software on mine which clearly states
95V, most probably HS have been involved

For intermittent noisy faults I bought a cheap Tempo Sidekick off of
eBay. The stress test was very useful and why BT have nothing like
it I don't know. It applies a 1khz tone across the pair at 140v and
you can watch the HR jump about on the meter. I picked it up for
£30 (but I've seen them go for a £1) and it gave me enough of an
edge to spend more valuable time drinking tea ;-)


So clearly you are one of the group you were slandering in previous post,
the one where you called field engineers lazy & drink tea all day. I
suppose it's ok if you have a box van (that makes you second stage then) but
all the end user facing engineers in this overall area have to put up with
panel vans where you don't have room to drinl tea let alone make it. before
you ask it, no the electric kettle (like a lot of other bits of kit) isn't
fit for puirpose.





  #10  
Old June 7th 08, 11:51 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Klunk
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 98
Default Diagnosing intermittent connection problems

On Sat, 07 Jun 2008 08:10:05 +0100, kraftee passed an empty day by
writing:

Klunk wrote:
On Fri, 06 Jun 2008 20:29:29 +0100, kraftee passed an empty day by
writing:

Klunk wrote:
On Thu, 05 Jun 2008 23:08:09 +0100, kraftee passed an empty day by
writing:

Mortimer wrote:
A customer has been having intermittent ADSL connection problems
ever since she got broadband about 6 months ago (though I only
learned of this a week ago) and the symptoms have got much more
frequent over the past couple of weeks.

Can I check that I have done the correct diagnostic checks.

The router is a BT Voyager 210.

Symptoms are either:

1. Router DSL light remains on but Internet light (ADSL logon) goes
out. This is the more frequent symptom.

or

2. Router DSL light goes out and router retrains. This happens less
frequently.


Typically everything works fine for about an hour and then there is
a flurry of problems with failures maybe every 10 minutes or so,
followed by another long fault-free period.

Why would a router that has a good DSL carrier intermittently lose
its logon and need to be manually connected again, either by
rebooting the router or else by going into the router's config page
and pressing the Connect button? I have put the router in the
master test socket with all other wiring/equipment disconnected. I
have replaced the RJ11-RJ11 cable and microfilter with an RJ11-BT
cable to elimiminate the effect of faults in the cable or filter.

I have checked the line stats and they are good: downstream
attenuation of about 30 dB and noise margin of 8 dB, and upstream
lower attenuation / higher margin. The results for the router in
the master test socket are only about 2 dB better than those with
the router in the normal house wiring with everythign connected,
which suggests that wiring/equipment is not the cause. Despite
these good figures, the router can be seen to lose sync at random -
the stats then disappear.

I have tried with another router (BT Voyager 220) and this reported
the same stats and failed in the same way. I wasn't able to check
the loss of ADSL logon connection when there was a good DSL carrier
because this router was locked to work only with BT lines - I've
since learned how to re-flash it to remove that restriction!


Does all of this point to a line fault between the master socket
and the exchange? It may be significant that when I was doing all
my testing, there was constant heavy rain which could cause water
in cable joins on poles or in underground ducts.


I've raised a call with the ISP but they haven't yet responded
apart from acknowledging the ticket and escalating it to the
correct department.

It could be an intermitent noise on the line, buggers to find if
there isn't any other diagnostics. Had one today, in the end I had
to swap a pair as there were no fault conditions other than this
intermitent noise (& before anybody says, no I didn't give it a
blast with my Mega as it's been taken away from me so I have to use
the infamous Hawk, looks like a ladies hand bag stuffed with bricks
& is twice as useless, most of the time).

The 'infamous hawk' has a 500v insulation tester built in, just like
the old 18c megger. Don't say you missed that on the training and
threw the booklet in the back of your van ;-)

Believe or not I'm still waiting for the advanced Hawk training for
over 2 years & the no training was provided by 2 work shy coaches
looking for a couple of days out of the field.. As for coupling it to
my PC via Bluetooth or serial port I figured it out on my own but
don't see a use for it until they actually start to record the test
readings, like never as with the Harrier..


It is not part of the advanced course. It is a basic feature of the
unit. Normally it tests at 95v but pressing the button next to that
figure cycles it through 95, 500, -500, -95. On later software they may
have removed it but it still exists in the 'bridge' mode enabling a
nice blast of 500v to be applied.


Well that's where we differ, later software on mine which clearly states
95V, most probably HS have been involved

For intermittent noisy faults I bought a cheap Tempo Sidekick off of
eBay. The stress test was very useful and why BT have nothing like it I
don't know. It applies a 1khz tone across the pair at 140v and you can
watch the HR jump about on the meter. I picked it up for 30 (but I've
seen them go for a 1) and it gave me enough of an edge to spend more
valuable time drinking tea ;-)


So clearly you are one of the group you were slandering in previous
post, the one where you called field engineers lazy & drink tea all day.
I suppose it's ok if you have a box van (that makes you second stage
then) but all the end user facing engineers in this overall area have to
put up with panel vans where you don't have room to drinl tea let alone
make it. before you ask it, no the electric kettle (like a lot of other
bits of kit) isn't fit for puirpose.


There you go jumping the gun and making wild assumptions again, in all
the years you have been posting here you've not gotten over doing that.

To answer your points before you disappear up your own arse:
1) I slandered nobody. I told the truth.
2) Yes, I had plenty of days drinking tea and dodging work. I also had
plenty of days doing work other people were dodging or f**king up.
3) I've always gone that 'extra mile'. Buying your own test kit to
resolve multiple repeat reports and basic things like actually knowing
how to use the kit you have tends to be helpful.
4) Customer facing always. Always apologising for lazy, overpaid, thick
engineers who spent the day cutting and running.
4) I don't recall ever driving a box van. They were for the extremely
lazy ****s (PPO's, PTO's etc.)
5) All electric kettles are fit for their purpose and PAT tested.

I've covered your points, keep digging - anything else?
 




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