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uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) (uk.telecom.broadband) Discussion of broadband services, technology and equipment as provided in the UK. Discussions of specific services based on ADSL, cable modems or other broadband technology are also on-topic. Advertising is not allowed.

New BT Iplate questions.



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 14th 08, 11:22 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Peter Crosland
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,463
Default New BT Iplate questions.

Reading the instructions that came with the Iplate kindly supplied FOC by
Plusnet I was puzzled by the fact that they said it should only be fitted to
NTE5 faceplates with the BT logo, and not the ones badged Openreach. So I
decided to investigate further. What I have established is that the fixed
part, that which is screwed to the wall, of the BT and Openreach NTE5 units
are identical both physically and electrically other than the logo.



I then looked inside the removable part of the NTE5 set. These differ both
physically and electrically. The Openreach one can be distinguished without
dismantling by a small moulded cylindrical protrusion below, and to the
right of the 4 way connector for wires. This allows clearance for an
additional capacitor that isolates the bell wire.



The Iplate has an inductor and a capacitor. Both the BT and Openreach
versions of the removable faceplate physically fit the Iplate but since the
instructions say not to use it I assume that there would be some undesirable
electrical interaction with the Openreach version.



As I don't have access to the necessary test gear I can't investigate
further and with the parlous state of my ADSL connection I don't intend to
experiment with it. The two types of NTE5 were kindly made available for
examination by a friendly builder who had salvaged them from buildings that
were being renovated.



I would be interested to hear from anyone who has any relevant detailed
knowledge of the IPlate design and application.

The email address is valid if you don't wish to comment publically.

Peter Crosland


  #2  
Old June 14th 08, 11:51 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
kráftéé
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,765
Default New BT Iplate questions.

Peter Crosland wrote:
Reading the instructions that came with the Iplate kindly supplied
FOC by Plusnet I was puzzled by the fact that they said it should
only be fitted to NTE5 faceplates with the BT logo, and not the
ones badged Openreach. So I decided to investigate further. What I
have established is that the fixed part, that which is screwed to
the wall, of the BT and Openreach NTE5 units are identical both
physically and electrically other than the logo.


I then looked inside the removable part of the NTE5 set. These
differ both physically and electrically. The Openreach one can be
distinguished without dismantling by a small moulded cylindrical
protrusion below, and to the right of the 4 way connector for
wires. This allows clearance for an additional capacitor that
isolates the bell wire.


The Iplate has an inductor and a capacitor. Both the BT and
Openreach versions of the removable faceplate physically fit the
Iplate but since the instructions say not to use it I assume that
there would be some undesirable electrical interaction with the
Openreach version.


As I don't have access to the necessary test gear I can't
investigate further and with the parlous state of my ADSL
connection I don't intend to experiment with it. The two types of
NTE5 were kindly made available for examination by a friendly
builder who had salvaged them from buildings that were being
renovated.


I would be interested to hear from anyone who has any relevant
detailed knowledge of the IPlate design and application.

The email address is valid if you don't wish to comment publically.

Peter Crosland


Think you'll find the the Iplate & the Openreach faceplate do exactly the
same job which is to choke any interference picked up by the bell wire
reducing your bandwidth. that's what I've gleaned from asking around but
like everybody else we're being kept in the dark.

One suggestion though do not pay to have it fitted as it would probably be a
complete waste of money (the fitting charge that is)


  #3  
Old June 15th 08, 10:51 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Peter Crosland
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,463
Default New BT Iplate questions.



--
Peter Crosland
"kraftee" wrote in message
news
Peter Crosland wrote:
Reading the instructions that came with the Iplate kindly supplied
FOC by Plusnet I was puzzled by the fact that they said it should
only be fitted to NTE5 faceplates with the BT logo, and not the
ones badged Openreach. So I decided to investigate further. What I
have established is that the fixed part, that which is screwed to
the wall, of the BT and Openreach NTE5 units are identical both
physically and electrically other than the logo.


I then looked inside the removable part of the NTE5 set. These
differ both physically and electrically. The Openreach one can be
distinguished without dismantling by a small moulded cylindrical
protrusion below, and to the right of the 4 way connector for
wires. This allows clearance for an additional capacitor that
isolates the bell wire.


The Iplate has an inductor and a capacitor. Both the BT and
Openreach versions of the removable faceplate physically fit the
Iplate but since the instructions say not to use it I assume that
there would be some undesirable electrical interaction with the
Openreach version.


As I don't have access to the necessary test gear I can't
investigate further and with the parlous state of my ADSL
connection I don't intend to experiment with it. The two types of
NTE5 were kindly made available for examination by a friendly
builder who had salvaged them from buildings that were being
renovated.


I would be interested to hear from anyone who has any relevant
detailed knowledge of the IPlate design and application.


Think you'll find the the Iplate & the Openreach faceplate do exactly the
same job which is to choke any interference picked up by the bell wire
reducing your bandwidth. that's what I've gleaned from asking around but
like everybody else we're being kept in the dark.


It seems that the two devices should do the same but why does the IPlate
need the addition of the wire wound inductor?

One suggestion though do not pay to have it fitted as it would probably be
a complete waste of money (the fitting charge that is)


Agreed but it has been designed so that it is very easy to fit assuming one
has a screwdriver and the ability to use it!

Peter Crosland


  #4  
Old June 15th 08, 01:26 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
kráftéé
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,765
Default New BT Iplate questions.

Peter Crosland wrote:
Peter Crosland wrote:
Reading the instructions that came with the Iplate kindly supplied
FOC by Plusnet I was puzzled by the fact that they said it should
only be fitted to NTE5 faceplates with the BT logo, and not the
ones badged Openreach. So I decided to investigate further. What I
have established is that the fixed part, that which is screwed to
the wall, of the BT and Openreach NTE5 units are identical both
physically and electrically other than the logo.


I then looked inside the removable part of the NTE5 set. These
differ both physically and electrically. The Openreach one can be
distinguished without dismantling by a small moulded cylindrical
protrusion below, and to the right of the 4 way connector for
wires. This allows clearance for an additional capacitor that
isolates the bell wire.


The Iplate has an inductor and a capacitor. Both the BT and
Openreach versions of the removable faceplate physically fit the
Iplate but since the instructions say not to use it I assume that
there would be some undesirable electrical interaction with the
Openreach version.


As I don't have access to the necessary test gear I can't
investigate further and with the parlous state of my ADSL
connection I don't intend to experiment with it. The two types of
NTE5 were kindly made available for examination by a friendly
builder who had salvaged them from buildings that were being
renovated.


I would be interested to hear from anyone who has any relevant
detailed knowledge of the IPlate design and application.


Think you'll find the the Iplate & the Openreach faceplate do
exactly the same job which is to choke any interference picked up
by the bell wire reducing your bandwidth. that's what I've
gleaned from asking around but like everybody else we're being
kept in the dark.


It seems that the two devices should do the same but why does the
IPlate need the addition of the wire wound inductor?


True, but remember the NTE faceplate will be free whilst you have to pay for
the Iplate so it's just got to be better (tongue in check sarcastic mode
off)

One suggestion though do not pay to have it fitted as it would
probably be a complete waste of money (the fitting charge that is)


Agreed but it has been designed so that it is very easy to fit
assuming one has a screwdriver and the ability to use it!


You'd be amazed how many people don't want to even take their own faceplate
off, even thought it could save them (quite literally) hundreds of pounds so
I'll wouldn't be suprised if some do want to pay to have the Iplate fitted.
Can't help but wonder about all those who have got the latest NTE who then
go on to buy/have fitted an Iplate as they are supposed to be mutually
exclusive. I can see more fun & games in the future


  #5  
Old June 19th 08, 07:28 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Terry_P
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 32
Default New BT Iplate questions.

On Sat, 14 Jun 2008 23:22:12 +0100, "Peter Crosland"
wrote:

Reading the instructions that came with the Iplate kindly supplied FOC by
Plusnet [snipped]


Can anyone tell me where I can buy an Iplate?

Thanks,
Terry_P
  #6  
Old June 19th 08, 09:58 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
Klunk
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 98
Default New BT Iplate questions.

On Thu, 19 Jun 2008 07:28:21 +0100, Terry_P passed an empty day by
writing:

On Sat, 14 Jun 2008 23:22:12 +0100, "Peter Crosland"
wrote:

Reading the instructions that came with the Iplate kindly supplied FOC
by Plusnet [snipped]


Can anyone tell me where I can buy an Iplate?

Thanks,
Terry_P


http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Faster-Broadband-BT-
IPlate_W0QQitemZ320264994574QQihZ011QQcategoryZ678 57QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

--
begin oefixed_in_2005.exe
  #7  
Old June 30th 08, 07:48 PM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default New BT Iplate questions.

I have an Iplate, purchased on Ebay at huge expense, and I am getting
up to 1.5MB increase in download speeds. It takes a little while to
rebalance itself but I seem to have moved from about 1.8MB to 3.3MB.

One question a friend has posed to me is - my Iplate is in the Master
BT Socket. My Broadband is connected directly into that socket. My
friend has a BT Master socket, but his internet is connected directly
into an extension socket. What benefit would an iplate be to him?

Roger










  #9  
Old July 4th 08, 01:13 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
m
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 82
Default New BT Iplate questions.



Terry_P wrote:
On Mon, 30 Jun 2008 11:48:26 -0700 (PDT),
wrote:


I have an Iplate, purchased on Ebay at huge expense, and I am getting
up to 1.5MB increase in download speeds. It takes a little while to
rebalance itself but I seem to have moved from about 1.8MB to 3.3MB.

One question a friend has posed to me is - my Iplate is in the Master
BT Socket. My Broadband is connected directly into that socket. My
friend has a BT Master socket, but his internet is connected directly
into an extension socket. What benefit would an iplate be to him?

Roger



That is a question I would like answered too. I have a new house with
integral garage and the BT Master socket is in the garage. I connect
my router into the socket in the bedroom above and it is the first
socket from the BT master socket. Would there be any benefit from an
Iplate in this situation?

TIA,
Terry_P


I don't profess to be an expert on the iplate but as I understand it, it
adds a high pass filter to the 'ring wire' so that ADSL data only goes
down the proper twisted pair to extensions (unless there has also been a
NTE filter plate at the master socket) and no 'one-legged' version of
the data escapes down the ring wire - causing an unbalance in the data
being sent around the house to extension sockets.
The whole advantage of fitting the NTE filter plate is that the ADSL
data is taken off the line at the earliest opportunity and not sent
around the house to multiple sockets. Each one of these can provide a
'mis-termination' to the data which can cause interference and
distortion to the ADSL signals or act as a pick-up of unwanted
interfering signals from electrical appliances etc.
(think like a ripple in a pond where anything sticking up out of the
water causes reflections which can cancel out the waves completely -
just the same in electrical signals in wires)

I am sure there will gradually appear people's experiences with the iplate.

In your situation, I should (temporarily?) connect your router (via a
filter) to the test socket behind the lower plate of the NTE.
If that makes a significant improvement in performance, consider fitting
a NTE filter and running a separate RJ11 up to your bedroom.
Maplin or CPC sell long RJ11 cables. No need to be ripped off in PC W****d

Mike

  #10  
Old July 4th 08, 10:30 AM posted to uk.telecom.broadband
John D.W.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5
Default New BT Iplate questions.

In article , says...


In your situation, I should (temporarily?) connect your router (via a
filter) to the test socket behind the lower plate of the NTE.
If that makes a significant improvement in performance, consider fitting
a NTE filter and running a separate RJ11 up to your bedroom.
Maplin or CPC sell long RJ11 cables. No need to be ripped off in PC W****d


I agree with this approach with one proviso - don't use a normal "flat"
RJ11 extension cable.

The OP should look at fitting a master socket faceplate filter of the
type that has a through connection from the back of the faceplate,
allowing the unfiltered ADSL signal to be connected pernamently e.g.
ADLnation XTE2005. Then connect the current twisted-pair phone cable to
the bedroom computer to the straight through connection and all the rest
of the home wiring to the filtered connection. This will remove the
ADSL signal from all the house wiring at the master socket, except on
the cable to the computer. This cable should only connect the A and B
wires to a single, twisted pair, with *no* other wires connected. The
socket in the bedroom should then be replaced with an RJ11 type so it
won't accept a dumb telephone, or with a filtered socket (e.g. XTF85),
if a local phone/fax modem is needed.

I find this to be much better than trying to run a plain RJ11 or a phone
extension cable, especially where this isn't twisted pair, all the way
back to the master socket's RJ11 ADSL socket. If you do want to use an
extension cable, you can get twisted pair RJ11s which do work - I've
even improved installations replacing only the cheap, flat RJ11 cable
supplied with the modem/router. It's (not) suprising the noise picked up
by this standard "ADSL modem" cable between the wall socket and the
modem/router, especaily when it is simply dropped down the back of the
computer with all the other noisy cables...

--
John W
To mail me replace the obvious with co.uk twice
 




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