A Broadband and ADSL forum. BroadbanterBanter

Welcome to BroadbanterBanter.

You are currently viewing as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions and other FREE features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload your own photos and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today.

Go Back   Home » BroadbanterBanter forum » Newsgroup Discussions » uk.comp.home-networking (UK home networking)
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

uk.comp.home-networking (UK home networking) (uk.comp.home-networking) Discussion of all aspects of computer networking in the home, regardless of the platforms, software, topologies and protocols used. Examples of topics include recommendations for hardware or suppliers (e.g. NICs and cabling), protocols, servers, and specific network software. Advertising is not allowed.

Network cable route



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old July 24th 08, 07:57 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Lonestar Steve
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Network cable route


Hi
I need to run a network cable to an upstairs bedroom, about 16 metres
in total. wireless won't work too well in this location for some
reason, rest of house ok.
The easiest route is running it next to the electric ring main cable,
would this effect the performance of the network connection?

Cheers
SJ
  #2  
Old July 24th 08, 08:50 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
robert
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 48
Default Network cable route

Lonestar Steve wrote:
Hi
I need to run a network cable to an upstairs bedroom, about 16 metres
in total. wireless won't work too well in this location for some
reason, rest of house ok.
The easiest route is running it next to the electric ring main cable,
would this effect the performance of the network connection?

Cheers
SJ

I have most of the rooms networked with the cables running alongside (
but of course physically separated as required by Elec regs) ringmains,
lighting cicuits and a submain over many metres.
Have no problems at all.
As long as you use proper network cable the twisted pairs should take
care of any potential mains pickup .
  #3  
Old July 26th 08, 01:35 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Paul P
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 19
Default Network cable route


"robert" wrote in message
...
Lonestar Steve wrote:
Hi
I need to run a network cable to an upstairs bedroom, about 16 metres
in total. wireless won't work too well in this location for some
reason, rest of house ok.
The easiest route is running it next to the electric ring main cable,
would this effect the performance of the network connection?

Cheers
SJ

I have most of the rooms networked with the cables running alongside ( but
of course physically separated as required by Elec regs) ringmains,
lighting cicuits and a submain over many metres.
Have no problems at all.
As long as you use proper network cable the twisted pairs should take care
of any potential mains pickup .


A twisted pair of cables will not prevent induction! You should be using
a SHIELDED cable. I run my PC cables everywhere near to mains
cables and it doesn't make any difference.


  #4  
Old July 26th 08, 02:20 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Rob Morley
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,379
Default Network cable route

On Sat, 26 Jul 2008 13:35:28 +0100
"Paul P" wrote:


"robert" wrote in message
...
Lonestar Steve wrote:
Hi
I need to run a network cable to an upstairs bedroom, about 16
metres in total. wireless won't work too well in this location for
some reason, rest of house ok.
The easiest route is running it next to the electric ring main
cable, would this effect the performance of the network connection?

Possibly - try it and see? You're not supposed to run Ethernet close
to power cabling, but in a domestic situation it often won't make much
difference.

I have most of the rooms networked with the cables running
alongside ( but of course physically separated as required by Elec
regs) ringmains, lighting cicuits and a submain over many metres.
Have no problems at all.
As long as you use proper network cable the twisted pairs should
take care of any potential mains pickup .


A twisted pair of cables will not prevent induction!


But as Ethernet uses a differential signal and the same potential will
be induced on each conductor it shouldn't generally be a problem.

You should be
using a SHIELDED cable. I run my PC cables everywhere near to mains
cables and it doesn't make any difference.


From what I've read STP can cause as many problems as it solves,
because a poor ground connection or a ground loop problem can make it
perform worse than Cat5. The main thing to watch is that there aren't
any sharp bends in your UTP cable.

  #5  
Old July 26th 08, 07:37 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
John W.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 11
Default Network cable route

In article , says...

A twisted pair of cables will not prevent induction! You should be using
a SHIELDED cable. I run my PC cables everywhere near to mains
cables and it doesn't make any difference.


You are correct in what you say BUT the induced signal is common-mode.
That is, the signal that is induced is of the same phase and magnitude
in each wire. Thus, a balanced receiver will not see this noise.
Practially, a twisted pair performs the same as a shielded single-wire
cable at the order of a foot, depending on the frequency of the
interfering signal.

If you are using non-twisted cable, or one that is loosely twisted, e.g
cat1 or phone cable (2.5 twists/ft), then it will present induced noise
with a normal node component, This is seen as noise by the receiver.

If you run a twisted pair alongside a mains cable carrying home power
without electronic switching (or home ethernet adaptors...), then any
interference is unlikly to be a problem for a good balanced receiver.
However, most receivers have a limit to the maximum amount of common
mode noise they can tolorate with respect to ground, since they don't
use high isolation voltage transformers to couple the signal into the
detection circuit.

Ethernet cat5e cables (non shielded) have each twist at a different
pitch. This is to ensure there is little chance of each pair running
with individual wires adjacent to a wire in another twisted pair, over a
substantial length. If it did this, then the high level TX signal in one
pair would interfere with the low level Rx signal on the adjacent pair
producing a normal node coupling. Once you have added even the cable
shieth into cat5e. there is little problem with cables outside the
shieth. Indeed, in every small home and most business installations
I've done, cat5e is fine running 100Mb Ethernet. There is no need to go
to cat6, with all the hassles of maintaining the screen over patch panel
cords, This needs special connectors.

How are you terminating the shields on your cables? If they are
unconnected, they they are performing little function other than
providing armouring. If the shield isn't foil, then it stops working at
a relativly low frequency - just ask a TV aerial installer... What
connectors are you using on the end? I've not seen one on a home
computer that connect the shield to ground.

--
John W
To mail me replace the obvious with co.uk twice
  #6  
Old July 27th 08, 03:14 PM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Dr Zoidberg
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default Network cable route

"Lonestar Steve" wrote in message
...

Hi
I need to run a network cable to an upstairs bedroom, about 16 metres
in total. wireless won't work too well in this location for some
reason, rest of house ok.
The easiest route is running it next to the electric ring main cable,
would this effect the performance of the network connection?


It might do.
There's no guarantees , but I'd probably give it a go anyway

--
Alex

"I laugh in the face of danger , then I hide until it goes away"

www.drzoidberg.co.uk

  #7  
Old July 28th 08, 10:37 AM posted to uk.comp.home-networking
Ric
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 29
Default Network cable route

On 24 Jul, 19:57, Lonestar Steve wrote:
Hi
I need to run a network cable to an upstairs bedroom, about 16 metres
in total. wireless won't work too well in this location for some
reason, rest of house ok.
The easiest route is running it next to the electric ring main cable,
would this effect the performance of the network connection?

Cheers
SJ


Have you considered powerline networking? There's loads of the
adaptors on ebay for around 40 quid the pair at the moment and they're
great. I've got a pair of 100mb ones and they just plug in and work
without any configuration.
Saves a lot of messing about with cables...
 




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Using VOIP as an audio route. harrogate3 uk.telecom.voip (UK VOIP) 12 October 2nd 07 03:23 PM
Wireless route/cable modem - newbie question Dave Spencer uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) 2 October 15th 06 03:41 PM
GUI frontend to ROUTE.EXE? SteveL uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) 11 June 2nd 05 08:17 PM
The Route to ADSL David Bradley uk.telecom.broadband (UK broadband) 2 October 31st 03 12:47 PM
Can I convert a FastCat5e network cable into a crossover cable? Sherri & Garry January uk.comp.home-networking (UK home networking) 10 October 30th 03 05:19 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 07:29 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 2.4.0
Copyright 2004-2019 BroadbanterBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.